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Re: [Classic_B_Vans] "Little" air compressor search

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  • Tom K
    The other thing I can comment is that the self service gas stations are too often not maintaining the air compressor and can spew out wet compressed air or
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 5, 2008
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      The other thing I can comment is that the self service gas stations are too often not maintaining the air compressor and can spew out wet compressed air or don't even have an air dryer on the system.

      Water in the tires make them build up too much air pressure and explode.

      Make it a point to go to a tire service shop to get air or fill it yourself from your own equipment.

      Better yet, go to a good tire shop and have them filled with nitrogen. So much more stable, the tires run cooler and therefore last longer and the thicker nitrogen is less likely to leak out.

      I know truckers who fill their tires with propane to make them run cool. But they say when they do blow, it's noisy!! LOL

      There is no telling what damage you've done to your tires running highway miles with 50 lbs under pressure. I bet they were very HOT when you finally found that air.

      I had understood the best tire pressure for your rig can be found at the point the tires run only warm if not cool to the touch. For me I found it at 5 lbs over what the door sticker says and right at the limit of the sidewall max number of 65 lbs. I understand 5 lbs over sidewall is w common determination.

      At every rest stop on a trip I will walk around and feel the temp of the tires to keep an eye on pressure. Others I know use hand held pyrometer to take a quick temp reading of all the tires at once.

      Tom K
      Charlotte, NC
      1988 Lesharo


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Mike VanPelt
      To: classicrv@yahoogroups.com ; Classic_B_Vans@yahoogroups.com ; Boondocking@yahoogroups.com ; rvrepair@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2008 7:44 PM
      Subject: [Classic_B_Vans] "Little" air compressor search


      Need to tap the collective wisdom of my favorite groups:



      Background: We got back from a great 3-day trip last weekend down through the Mississippi Palisades & up the river. Trip went great with one fly in the ointment.



      As we packed up to leave, I noticed that all six (!) of my tires, duallys included, were 30-lbs low. I had service done just before leaving, and all I can think of is that the tech read the door for the pressure on the original 225/R16's. Unfortunately, there are 235/R16's on there now, that take 80 lbs. I guess I just didn't check them earlier. Yes, I should have noticed it but simply said, I didn't.



      Anyway, trying to find a place on the weekend that was 1) open, 2) had a air compressor that would handle the 80 lbs necessary, and 3) had the right air chuck to do the duallys was an adventure. Eventually some nice folks pointed us to a body shop in Savanna, IL that had a shop compressor - but the chuck only could get to the outer duallys and the fronts. We limped up the Mississippi all the way to SW Wisconsin before I found a Farm & Fleet whose auto/truck shop was still open & could air up the inner duallys.



      OK - I'm planning to carry my own personal truck air chuck from now on. However, I'm closing the barn door after the horse got out here . . . and started thinking . . . so here's the question: I'm wondering if there's a small compressor, smaller than a pancake job but still with a tank, that has the gumption to air up my tires.



      Most of the tankless mini compressors I'm familiar with, just like most "free air" gas station compressors, aren't really built to air up what's essentially a truck tire, and some I've looked at that do/might have the capacity don't have the chuck I'd need or the ability to attach the chuck I'd need. I'd kind of like to have the flexibility of an air tank, too, so I could use air tools on the road.



      Anyone have a recommendation?



      Mike





      ======================

      Cindy & Mike VanPelt

      - Libby & Darcy

      Milwaukee, WI, USA

      1997 Itasca Spirit 21RK Class C

      - 21', Ford E350, 460V8

      1979 Champion TransVan Model 604 Class B+

      -19', Dodge B300 Sportsman, 360V8









      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • dxxx cxxxxx
      I go by what the tire pressure is on the sidewall of the tire, it lists the maximum air pressure. you can run less if it s too stiff, but under the load of a
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 6, 2008
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        I go by what the tire pressure is on the sidewall of the tire, it lists the maximum air pressure. you can run less if it's too stiff, but under the load of a motor home or truck, i usually go to the max. i would stay within 10% of the max anyway. the handheld temp guns are down to 30 or 40 bucks now, so that is a good option for keeping an eye on tire temps. Doug


        --- On Wed, 11/5/08, Tom K <tkoro@...> wrote:

        > From: Tom K <tkoro@...>
        > Subject: [classicrv] Re: [Classic_B_Vans] "Little" air compressor search
        > To: Classic_B_Vans@yahoogroups.com
        > Cc: classicrv@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Wednesday, November 5, 2008, 5:42 AM
        > The other thing I can comment is that the self service gas
        > stations are too often not maintaining the air compressor
        > and can spew out wet compressed air or don't even have
        > an air dryer on the system.
        >
        > Water in the tires make them build up too much air pressure
        > and explode.
        >
        > Make it a point to go to a tire service shop to get air or
        > fill it yourself from your own equipment.
        >
        > Better yet, go to a good tire shop and have them filled
        > with nitrogen. So much more stable, the tires run cooler
        > and therefore last longer and the thicker nitrogen is less
        > likely to leak out.
        >
        > I know truckers who fill their tires with propane to make
        > them run cool. But they say when they do blow, it's
        > noisy!! LOL
        >
        > There is no telling what damage you've done to your
        > tires running highway miles with 50 lbs under pressure. I
        > bet they were very HOT when you finally found that air.
        >
        > I had understood the best tire pressure for your rig can be
        > found at the point the tires run only warm if not cool to
        > the touch. For me I found it at 5 lbs over what the door
        > sticker says and right at the limit of the sidewall max
        > number of 65 lbs. I understand 5 lbs over sidewall is w
        > common determination.
        >
        > At every rest stop on a trip I will walk around and feel
        > the temp of the tires to keep an eye on pressure. Others I
        > know use hand held pyrometer to take a quick temp reading
        > of all the tires at once.
        >
        > Tom K
        > Charlotte, NC
        > 1988 Lesharo
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Mike VanPelt
        > To: classicrv@yahoogroups.com ;
        > Classic_B_Vans@yahoogroups.com ; Boondocking@yahoogroups.com
        > ; rvrepair@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2008 7:44 PM
        > Subject: [Classic_B_Vans] "Little" air
        > compressor search
        >
        >
        > Need to tap the collective wisdom of my favorite groups:
        >
        >
        >
        > Background: We got back from a great 3-day trip last
        > weekend down through the Mississippi Palisades & up the
        > river. Trip went great with one fly in the ointment.
        >
        >
        >
        > As we packed up to leave, I noticed that all six (!) of
        > my tires, duallys included, were 30-lbs low. I had service
        > done just before leaving, and all I can think of is that the
        > tech read the door for the pressure on the original
        > 225/R16's. Unfortunately, there are 235/R16's on
        > there now, that take 80 lbs. I guess I just didn't
        > check them earlier. Yes, I should have noticed it but
        > simply said, I didn't.
        >
        >
        >
        > Anyway, trying to find a place on the weekend that was 1)
        > open, 2) had a air compressor that would handle the 80 lbs
        > necessary, and 3) had the right air chuck to do the duallys
        > was an adventure. Eventually some nice folks pointed us to
        > a body shop in Savanna, IL that had a shop compressor - but
        > the chuck only could get to the outer duallys and the
        > fronts. We limped up the Mississippi all the way to SW
        > Wisconsin before I found a Farm & Fleet whose auto/truck
        > shop was still open & could air up the inner duallys.
        >
        >
        >
        > OK - I'm planning to carry my own personal truck air
        > chuck from now on. However, I'm closing the barn door
        > after the horse got out here . . . and started thinking . .
        > . so here's the question: I'm wondering if
        > there's a small compressor, smaller than a pancake job
        > but still with a tank, that has the gumption to air up my
        > tires.
        >
        >
        >
        > Most of the tankless mini compressors I'm familiar
        > with, just like most "free air" gas station
        > compressors, aren't really built to air up what's
        > essentially a truck tire, and some I've looked at that
        > do/might have the capacity don't have the chuck I'd
        > need or the ability to attach the chuck I'd need.
        > I'd kind of like to have the flexibility of an air tank,
        > too, so I could use air tools on the road.
        >
        >
        >
        > Anyone have a recommendation?
        >
        >
        >
        > Mike
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ======================
        >
        > Cindy & Mike VanPelt
        >
        > - Libby & Darcy
        >
        > Milwaukee, WI, USA
        >
        > 1997 Itasca Spirit 21RK Class C
        >
        > - 21', Ford E350, 460V8
        >
        > 1979 Champion TransVan Model 604 Class B+
        >
        > -19', Dodge B300 Sportsman, 360V8
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Ron Mitchell
        I ve always been told to run according to load, at least on the RV. I ve looked at the tire s rating and it s something like 110psi, but when I checked the
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 6, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          I've always been told to run according to load, at least on the
          RV. I've looked at the tire's rating and it's something like 110psi,
          but when I checked the load chart, at my GVWR, full load, it's only
          around 80psi. The tires are rated to carry nearly a half a ton more
          (each) than I'm putting on them. The downside of having a tire
          overinflated is handling, ride, wear and safety. I read somewhere
          that a grossly overinflated tire will not withstand a hard shock,
          like a pothole, as well and can shatter. I don't know about that one,
          but I do know the ride is much better at the proper inflation pressure.
          I had a tire chart for inflation vs load for various tire sizes
          and types. I may have posted it in the Files section. I know there's
          a chart in my manual for the various Dodge Motor Home Chassis.
          Pressures go from 55 to 110, depending on size, type and loading. I'd
          check with your tire manufacturer, most have web sites with tire
          inflation information. I think DOT also has a site.

          Ron
          76 Coachmen

          At 03:58 AM 11/06/2008, you wrote:

          >I go by what the tire pressure is on the sidewall of the tire, it
          >lists the maximum air pressure. you can run less if it's too stiff,
          >but under the load of a motor home or truck, i usually go to the
          >max. i would stay within 10% of the max anyway. the handheld temp
          >guns are down to 30 or 40 bucks now, so that is a good option for
          >keeping an eye on tire temps. Doug
          >
          >--- On Wed, 11/5/08, Tom K
          ><<mailto:tkoro%40navacore.net>tkoro@...> wrote:
          >
          > > From: Tom K <<mailto:tkoro%40navacore.net>tkoro@...>
          > > Subject: [classicrv] Re: [Classic_B_Vans] "Little" air compressor search
          > > To: <mailto:Classic_B_Vans%40yahoogroups.com>Classic_B_Vans@yahoogroups.com
          > > Cc: <mailto:classicrv%40yahoogroups.com>classicrv@yahoogroups.com
          > > Date: Wednesday, November 5, 2008, 5:42 AM
          > > The other thing I can comment is that the self service gas
          > > stations are too often not maintaining the air compressor
          > > and can spew out wet compressed air or don't even have
          > > an air dryer on the system.
          > >
          > > Water in the tires make them build up too much air pressure
          > > and explode.
          > >
          > > Make it a point to go to a tire service shop to get air or
          > > fill it yourself from your own equipment.
          > >
          > > Better yet, go to a good tire shop and have them filled
          > > with nitrogen. So much more stable, the tires run cooler
          > > and therefore last longer and the thicker nitrogen is less
          > > likely to leak out.
          > >
          > > I know truckers who fill their tires with propane to make
          > > them run cool. But they say when they do blow, it's
          > > noisy!! LOL
          > >
          > > There is no telling what damage you've done to your
          > > tires running highway miles with 50 lbs under pressure. I
          > > bet they were very HOT when you finally found that air.
          > >
          > > I had understood the best tire pressure for your rig can be
          > > found at the point the tires run only warm if not cool to
          > > the touch. For me I found it at 5 lbs over what the door
          > > sticker says and right at the limit of the sidewall max
          > > number of 65 lbs. I understand 5 lbs over sidewall is w
          > > common determination.
          > >
          > > At every rest stop on a trip I will walk around and feel
          > > the temp of the tires to keep an eye on pressure. Others I
          > > know use hand held pyrometer to take a quick temp reading
          > > of all the tires at once.
          > >
          > > Tom K
          > > Charlotte, NC
          > > 1988 Lesharo
          > >
          > >
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: Mike VanPelt
          > > To: <mailto:classicrv%40yahoogroups.com>classicrv@yahoogroups.com ;
          > >
          > <mailto:Classic_B_Vans%40yahoogroups.com>Classic_B_Vans@yahoogroups.com
          > ; <mailto:Boondocking%40yahoogroups.com>Boondocking@yahoogroups.com
          > > ; <mailto:rvrepair%40yahoogroups.com>rvrepair@yahoogroups.com
          > > Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2008 7:44 PM
          > > Subject: [Classic_B_Vans] "Little" air
          > > compressor search
          > >
          > >
          > > Need to tap the collective wisdom of my favorite groups:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Background: We got back from a great 3-day trip last
          > > weekend down through the Mississippi Palisades & up the
          > > river. Trip went great with one fly in the ointment.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > As we packed up to leave, I noticed that all six (!) of
          > > my tires, duallys included, were 30-lbs low. I had service
          > > done just before leaving, and all I can think of is that the
          > > tech read the door for the pressure on the original
          > > 225/R16's. Unfortunately, there are 235/R16's on
          > > there now, that take 80 lbs. I guess I just didn't
          > > check them earlier. Yes, I should have noticed it but
          > > simply said, I didn't.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Anyway, trying to find a place on the weekend that was 1)
          > > open, 2) had a air compressor that would handle the 80 lbs
          > > necessary, and 3) had the right air chuck to do the duallys
          > > was an adventure. Eventually some nice folks pointed us to
          > > a body shop in Savanna, IL that had a shop compressor - but
          > > the chuck only could get to the outer duallys and the
          > > fronts. We limped up the Mississippi all the way to SW
          > > Wisconsin before I found a Farm & Fleet whose auto/truck
          > > shop was still open & could air up the inner duallys.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > OK - I'm planning to carry my own personal truck air
          > > chuck from now on. However, I'm closing the barn door
          > > after the horse got out here . . . and started thinking . .
          > > . so here's the question: I'm wondering if
          > > there's a small compressor, smaller than a pancake job
          > > but still with a tank, that has the gumption to air up my
          > > tires.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Most of the tankless mini compressors I'm familiar
          > > with, just like most "free air" gas station
          > > compressors, aren't really built to air up what's
          > > essentially a truck tire, and some I've looked at that
          > > do/might have the capacity don't have the chuck I'd
          > > need or the ability to attach the chuck I'd need.
          > > I'd kind of like to have the flexibility of an air tank,
          > > too, so I could use air tools on the road.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Anyone have a recommendation?
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Mike
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ======================
          > >
          > > Cindy & Mike VanPelt
          > >
          > > - Libby & Darcy
          > >
          > > Milwaukee, WI, USA
          > >
          > > 1997 Itasca Spirit 21RK Class C
          > >
          > > - 21', Ford E350, 460V8
          > >
          > > 1979 Champion TransVan Model 604 Class B+
          > >
          > > -19', Dodge B300 Sportsman, 360V8
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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