Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [classicrv] Vintage

Expand Messages
  • Ron Mitchell
    Normally, the chain will slow down and stop on it s own after you release the throttle. On a correctly adjusted chain saw, the chain will not move at an idle.
    Message 1 of 20 , Jun 3, 2007
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Normally, the chain will slow down and stop on it's own after you
      release the throttle. On a correctly adjusted chain saw, the chain
      will not move at an idle. If the carb is worn or out of adjustment or
      the gas/oil mix is way out, the engine might surge at idle and spin
      the chain a little. This will also happen if the idle is set too
      fast. I've had Homelites, a McCulloch Mac Cat, and now a Stihl. All
      of them just sit there at an idle and make smoke and noise.

      The chain brake is an emergency device connected to a paddle-like
      lever in front of the top handle. Under normal conditions, it doesn't
      do anything. But, if you catch the tip and/or the saw bucks up at
      your face, the paddle will hit your forearm, trip the brake, and stop
      the chain, even at full throttle. It keeps you from accidentally
      giving yourself a reverse Mohawk. You are supposed to test this by
      pushing the paddle forward (with the engine at idle). The brake
      should trip. Squeezing on the throttle will not cause the chain to
      move. Just give the throttle a quick squeeze to rev up the engine and
      verify the blade will not move. Keeping the throttle on too long will
      damage your clutch. Pull back on the paddle to release the brake into
      its "armed" position. The chain should now spin normally with
      throttle and stop at an idle.

      Ron
      76 Coachmen

      At 02:42 PM 06/01/2007, you wrote:

      >Does it stop like an e-brake would? I suppose I should have
      >explained better, but when you let the gas off it does not stop as
      >an e-brake would. The chain slows down and spins slightly at idle,
      >unless your bar is dry.
      >Correct me if I'm wrong... Please!
    • Jim & Jan Louiselle
      ... 1935 is still in ... http://www.aol.com. ... My guess would be that looking at the dual rear axle and the shear size of the vehicle,and how stiff it
      Message 2 of 20 , Jun 3, 2007
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, JerryK <regal5575@...> wrote:
        >
        > Did you notice the price of Gasoline at the gas station? 16 cents.
        > JerryK
        >
        > cammalu2@... wrote:
        > I wonder if this old RV/Bus/Airplane/whatchamacallit from
        1935 is still in
        > existence? Funny sounding engine too.
        >
        > _http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YyFQgGTHfs_
        > (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YyFQgGTHfs)
        >
        > ************************************** See what's free at
        http://www.aol.com
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > Pretty wild bodywork there.
        My guess would be that looking at the dual rear axle and the shear
        size of the vehicle,and how stiff it appears to ride, ( not much sway)
        along that distinct exhaust note, that what we have here is a
        retrofitted heavy duty military truck, probably a 6 to 8 ton transport.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Got a little couch potato?
        > Check out fun summer activities for kids.
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.