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Rust treatment

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  • sharonjr
    Does anybody have any experience w/ Rust Bullet or other rust treatment product(s)? The claims sound like what I want: something that will stop current rust &
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 10, 2007
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      Does anybody have any experience w/ Rust Bullet or other rust
      treatment product(s)? The claims sound like what I want: something
      that will stop current rust & prevent more from forming w/o alot of
      surface prep. However, I suspect it's quite expensive & my budget is
      very limited so I don't want to 'try' something only to find a year or
      so later it didn't do the job. I've used Permatex Extend w/ mixed
      results. My Falcon, contrary to the sellers assurance, appears to have
      leaked in many places for quite some time resulting in many areas of
      sheet metal that need treatment & repair. Any suggestions appreciated.
      Thank you, Sharon
    • Lisa Shelly
      Sharon - I had a 56 Chevy p/u pick up that I bought some POR15 for years ago at the tune of 120.00 for 1 gallon - in 1994 Well - I used some - maybe not enough
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 10, 2007
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        Sharon -

        I had a 56 Chevy p/u pick up that I bought some POR15 for years ago at the tune of 120.00 for 1 gallon - in 1994 Well - I used some - maybe not enough but it seemed as though either I didn't apply it right - or it just didn't work as it laid claim to. So be aware & study up on anything before using.

        The only way to STOP rust is to remove it - plain & simple. Rust occurs/grows because of AIR/metal mixture. The POR was supposed to completely stop the air from ever getting to the metal again - As I said maybe I didn't apply enough or follow directions - I would surf the net - google & get into forums & see what other people say that have used these products. I have not so I cannot give advise.
        Being married to a body mechanic I can say that my husband believed that cutting the rust out & putting fresh metal back in its place was really the ONLY way to stop it. Its like a cancer and spreads. The surface prep would be wire brushing as I recall w/ the POR15 - with other things it would be to grind the metal until you no longer saw rust. I worked in a lab at a Zinc Die cast shop for sometime & have some pretty extensive experience with metals & corrosives.
        It truly is a cancer - and in my opinion if left outside will only get worse. Creating a barrier to keep the air from it is great as anything you do to try to slow it down is a bonus. If your going to use something like that - of course stay away from the motor oil situation, the stuff wont stick to the metal until it is de-greased. My Rigs (MH) are Fiberglass - so thank god I never have to worry - about rust that is. Most my trailers are aluminum - though that will corrode as well if its not taken care of. Thats why Air Stream started to "clear coat" the trailers - to preserve the metal and help w/ scratches. It kept that powdery aluminum look & pock marks appearance to a minimum.
        Prime example of Air & metal problems is the old Pot metal hood ornaments (sp) all those pot marks & breaks in the chrome plate is from air getting under the plate & allowing corrosion to start to eat away on the Zinc below.

        Rambling - Do a search & see what others think out on the net.

        Lisa

        sharonjr <sharonjr@...> wrote: Does anybody have any experience w/ Rust Bullet or other rust
        treatment product(s)? The claims sound like what I want: something
        that will stop current rust & prevent more from forming w/o alot of
        surface prep. However, I suspect it's quite expensive & my budget is
        very limited so I don't want to 'try' something only to find a year or
        so later it didn't do the job. I've used Permatex Extend w/ mixed
        results. My Falcon, contrary to the sellers assurance, appears to have
        leaked in many places for quite some time resulting in many areas of
        sheet metal that need treatment & repair. Any suggestions appreciated.
        Thank you, Sharon






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • bobs92504
        RE: POR-15 For a number of years I was ran an owners club for Volkswagen Things , a 4 door convertible military type car that was famous for always leaking.
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 10, 2007
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          RE: POR-15

          For a number of years I was ran an owners club for
          Volkswagen "Things", a 4 door convertible military type car that was
          famous for always leaking. As a world wide group, with over 2000
          members, we recommended and used the POR-15 products (There are
          several) to protect pans and under pinnings on these cars. In
          general, after following the prep instructions, we had very good
          luck and I heard of few instances where the desired level of
          protection wasn't achieved. The stuff is very expensive, but the
          results were usually worth the expense. BTW: I don't think you can
          buy POR-15 products in SoCal due to VOC limits, but you can go up to
          Santa Barbara and get what you want.

          I think that proper product selection and preparation is the key to
          getting good results with these products.

          IMHO: the key word in rust is oxidation, take away the oxygen and
          you shouldn't have oxidation.
        • dxxx cxxxxx
          Hi, Rust bullet is an excellent product, and i have found it to be everything they say it is. there are two things i like about it over por-15, the first
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 11, 2007
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            Hi, Rust bullet is an excellent product, and i have
            found it to be everything they say it is. there are
            two things i like about it over por-15, the first
            being it is uv stable without a topcoat, (por-15 will
            turn chalky) the other is most treatments including
            por 15 will adhere better to rust than clean metal.
            rust bullet will adhere equally well to rusty metal or
            new metal. it also sticks well to plastics etc, and
            can actually be used as an adhesion promoter for hard
            to paint materials. i have also filled holes up to 1/8
            in. with it. Doug


            --- sharonjr <sharonjr@...> wrote:

            > Does anybody have any experience w/ Rust Bullet or
            > other rust
            > treatment product(s)? The claims sound like what I
            > want: something
            > that will stop current rust & prevent more from
            > forming w/o alot of
            > surface prep. However, I suspect it's quite
            > expensive & my budget is
            > very limited so I don't want to 'try' something only
            > to find a year or
            > so later it didn't do the job. I've used Permatex
            > Extend w/ mixed
            > results. My Falcon, contrary to the sellers
            > assurance, appears to have
            > leaked in many places for quite some time resulting
            > in many areas of
            > sheet metal that need treatment & repair. Any
            > suggestions appreciated.
            > Thank you, Sharon
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >




            ____________________________________________________________________________________
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            Have a HUGE year through Yahoo! Small Business.
            http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/domains/?p=BESTDEAL
          • Michael J. Kupec
            POR-15 has it merits, but it can be a pain to get to work right. Biggest problem it has is that it s not tolerant to any kind of oil on the metal that you re
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 11, 2007
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              POR-15 has it merits, but it can be a pain to get to work right. Biggest
              problem it has is that it's not tolerant to any kind of oil on the metal
              that you're painting. Of course Rust Bullet is the same way. A complete
              removal of oil using POR's surface prep stuff is a must if you want perfect
              results. I've been told I can get away with Castrol Super Clean to clean the
              chassis prior to using Rust Bullet so I'll look into that for painting my
              Coachmen's undercarriage & RV frame since it's cheaper than the POR
              cleaners.

              For either, removal of any loose rust is a must, but surface rust can be
              left behind since this actually helps them to bond to the metal. I've got a
              master brake cylinder in my shed a fellow early Bronco owner painted with
              glossy black POR-15. It looks like it was enameled. The POR coating is thick
              and so hard that repeated whacks with a hammer won't chip it. He painted it
              just to see how POR worked, never to use, but I bet I could rebuild it's
              insides and have a nice master cylinder. I've got another master cylinder
              laying around that I'm tempted to try Rust Bullet to see the difference in
              how it handles wear and tear.

              As for not being UV resistant, if you're using it in a engine compartment or
              under carriage, little of the suns rays get down there so it's not really
              necessary. I've POR-15'd my 1970's Bronco frame and axles with it and they
              have gotten a little hazy, but the POR-15 coating is still good. They
              generally stay covered with a thin film of mud so it doesn't really matter
              to me if they look hazy. If you're planning on doing sheet metal with it,
              make sure you can get to both sides of the sheet metal to coat it. It's not
              worth just painting the one side and ignore the rusty other side. If you do
              plan on doing a surface that will get sun and not be painted over, then the
              Rust Bullet is a better choice. I've used both myself and they work with
              each other with no problem (not mixed, but you can apply one over the
              other.) If I was protecting new metal, I'd use Rust Bullet, but old rusty
              metal seems to work well with POR. POR definitely doesn't like clean new
              metal unless you etch-rust it with a salt spray before painting it.

              If you really can get to every rusted area with either Rust bullet or POR 15
              and you have a couple of small areas of rust through you'd like to fix, POR
              offers a two part epoxy putty you can use to fill in the area. It's a water
              soluble epoxy that once hardened is stronger than steel (but not as heat
              resistant!). With it being water soluble, you ca mix, apply and then shape
              it and smooth it out by wetting your fingers and smoothing it out. Multiple
              layers are OK and I've filled in a couple of inaccessible areas on the
              Bronco's body with it prior to final finishing and painting.

              Check out POR's web site for more info here: www.por15.com

              Rust Bullet's info can be found here: http://www.rustbullet.com/index.htm

              Michael J. Kupec
              mkupec@...
              mkupec@...
              http://www.blueovalcorral.com

              The beatings will continue until morale improves.



              ________________________________

              From: classicrv@yahoogroups.com [mailto:classicrv@yahoogroups.com]
              On Behalf Of dxxx cxxxxx
              Sent: Wednesday, April 11, 2007 3:24 AM
              To: classicrv@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [classicrv] Rust treatment



              Hi, Rust bullet is an excellent product, and i have
              found it to be everything they say it is. there are
              two things i like about it over por-15, the first
              being it is uv stable without a topcoat, (por-15 will
              turn chalky) the other is most treatments including
              por 15 will adhere better to rust than clean metal.
              rust bullet will adhere equally well to rusty metal or
              new metal. it also sticks well to plastics etc, and
              can actually be used as an adhesion promoter for hard
              to paint materials. i have also filled holes up to 1/8
              in. with it. Doug
            • Lisa Shelly
              Might sound silly but JB Weld works for rust too - for a small area s. I had a 67 Triumph motorcycle tank that was riddled w/ holes from condensation & sitting
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 11, 2007
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                Might sound silly but JB Weld works for rust too - for a small area's. I had a 67 Triumph motorcycle tank that was riddled w/ holes from condensation & sitting before I got it. The whole bottom.I couldn't locate another tanks so I took & mixed 2 large tubes of JB & got a body putty tool & spread it like bondo. Crazy - though here it is 12 years later & it is still not leaking & holding gas just fine. Had the tank painted 1 month after so it could cure good & it was smooth as silk. So - for pin hole rust - as large as I recall eraser size holes too. Id use the stuff again under those conditions. The gasoline wont break it down.

                Thanks for the info on the POR15 - I still have 3/4 of a gallon left, though after all these years would wonder if it was still good.



                "Michael J. Kupec" <mkupec@...> wrote: POR-15 has it merits, but it can be a pain to get to work right. Biggest
                problem it has is that it's not tolerant to any kind of oil on the metal
                that you're painting. Of course Rust Bullet is the same way. A complete
                removal of oil using POR's surface prep stuff is a must if you want perfect
                results. I've been told I can get away with Castrol Super Clean to clean the
                chassis prior to using Rust Bullet so I'll look into that for painting my
                Coachmen's undercarriage & RV frame since it's cheaper than the POR
                cleaners.

                For either, removal of any loose rust is a must, but surface rust can be
                left behind since this actually helps them to bond to the metal. I've got a
                master brake cylinder in my shed a fellow early Bronco owner painted with
                glossy black POR-15. It looks like it was enameled. The POR coating is thick
                and so hard that repeated whacks with a hammer won't chip it. He painted it
                just to see how POR worked, never to use, but I bet I could rebuild it's
                insides and have a nice master cylinder. I've got another master cylinder
                laying around that I'm tempted to try Rust Bullet to see the difference in
                how it handles wear and tear.

                As for not being UV resistant, if you're using it in a engine compartment or
                under carriage, little of the suns rays get down there so it's not really
                necessary. I've POR-15'd my 1970's Bronco frame and axles with it and they
                have gotten a little hazy, but the POR-15 coating is still good. They
                generally stay covered with a thin film of mud so it doesn't really matter
                to me if they look hazy. If you're planning on doing sheet metal with it,
                make sure you can get to both sides of the sheet metal to coat it. It's not
                worth just painting the one side and ignore the rusty other side. If you do
                plan on doing a surface that will get sun and not be painted over, then the
                Rust Bullet is a better choice. I've used both myself and they work with
                each other with no problem (not mixed, but you can apply one over the
                other.) If I was protecting new metal, I'd use Rust Bullet, but old rusty
                metal seems to work well with POR. POR definitely doesn't like clean new
                metal unless you etch-rust it with a salt spray before painting it.

                If you really can get to every rusted area with either Rust bullet or POR 15
                and you have a couple of small areas of rust through you'd like to fix, POR
                offers a two part epoxy putty you can use to fill in the area. It's a water
                soluble epoxy that once hardened is stronger than steel (but not as heat
                resistant!). With it being water soluble, you ca mix, apply and then shape
                it and smooth it out by wetting your fingers and smoothing it out. Multiple
                layers are OK and I've filled in a couple of inaccessible areas on the
                Bronco's body with it prior to final finishing and painting.

                Check out POR's web site for more info here: www.por15.com

                Rust Bullet's info can be found here: http://www.rustbullet.com/index.htm

                Michael J. Kupec
                mkupec@...
                mkupec@...
                http://www.blueovalcorral.com

                The beatings will continue until morale improves.

                ________________________________

                From: classicrv@yahoogroups.com [mailto:classicrv@yahoogroups.com]
                On Behalf Of dxxx cxxxxx
                Sent: Wednesday, April 11, 2007 3:24 AM
                To: classicrv@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [classicrv] Rust treatment



                Hi, Rust bullet is an excellent product, and i have
                found it to be everything they say it is. there are
                two things i like about it over por-15, the first
                being it is uv stable without a topcoat, (por-15 will
                turn chalky) the other is most treatments including
                por 15 will adhere better to rust than clean metal.
                rust bullet will adhere equally well to rusty metal or
                new metal. it also sticks well to plastics etc, and
                can actually be used as an adhesion promoter for hard
                to paint materials. i have also filled holes up to 1/8
                in. with it. Doug






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • greywolf200t@earthlink.net
                RE: POR-15 I was in the auto restoration business for a number of years and I agree that the best way to get rid of rust is to cut it out and replace it, but
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 11, 2007
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                  RE: POR-15

                  I was in the auto restoration business for a number of years and I agree
                  that the best way to get rid of rust is to cut it out and replace it, but
                  the next best thing I've found is POR-15. As replacing metal is always an
                  expensive proposition, I was often asked for the next viable option. In one
                  case on a '65 Tbird door which with rust bubbling though at the corner, I
                  used POR-15 inside and out and 15 years later it was still solid. There was
                  a '71 Blazer door with rust in the hinge area, again with POR-15 inside and
                  out, 10 years later it is still good. I also used Extend, which is a
                  conversion coating rather than a protective coating, on a '75 Chev Impala
                  convt. to stabilize it until the owner could get the money to restore it.
                  Four years later was still in very good shape.

                  A restorer will always recommend replacing rust with metal, because his
                  reputation is at stake, and I know many that wouldn't even consider using
                  chemical treatments. I've also seen many instances of replaced metal rust
                  and also metal that had been stripped and prepared properly rust where there
                  wasn't any rust previously. So there are really no guarantees, especially
                  in the uncontrolled atmosphere of the amateur restorer.

                  Jack Byrd '77 Argosy MH

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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