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How to use a portable air tank

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  • TravelswCharlie
    I bought a used Campbell Hausfield Portable Air Tank from a campground neighbor, but I m not sure how to use it. The label doesn t state a capacity , but
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 30, 2006
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      I bought a used "Campbell Hausfield Portable Air Tank" from a
      campground neighbor, but I'm not sure how to use it.

      The label doesn't state a "capacity", but does say "WARNING! don't
      fill above 125 PSI". It has a gauge that goes up to 160 PSI, with
      all above 125 PSI showing the red danger zone.

      My first question is, can all this be simply worked out
      mathematically?

      Right now, the gauge reads 60 pounds, and the tire I want to fill
      will be full at 85 pounds. (I don't mean it needs 85 pounds; it
      needs about 10 pounds to be at the right pressure.)

      Does the above mean that this tank is "effectively" empty as far
      as that tire is concerned?

      I have a "Sears Craftsman Air Compressor". The label on the side
      reads:
      1.5 HP Air Delivery: 40 SCFM at 40 PSI
      2.9 SCFM at 90 PSI 120 volt 125 MAX

      Should it be possible to fill the air tank to 125 PSI with this
      compressor, and with no danger of going too high?

      Thanks very much for any help,

      CJ

      Check my blog for "Birding and RVing in the Rio Grande Valley of
      Texas", links to the most beautiful bird photos you've ever seen.
      and a map with RV Parks locations in the Valley.
      http://camping-and-rv-travel-adventures.blogspot.com/
    • Bill Combs
      The tank is only a storage device and must be filled to an absolute pressure greater than that needed in the tire. Otherwise, the tire will fill the tank until
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 30, 2006
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        The tank is only a storage device and must be filled to an absolute
        pressure greater than that needed in the tire. Otherwise, the tire
        will fill the tank until the pressure is the same in both.

        There should also be a "maximum pressure rating" on your compressor.
        If that is at or above 125 psi, you can use it to fully charge the tank.

        Generally speaking, a 1.5 hp compressor with the specified delivery
        rates should have a max pressure rating of 125 or above. Practically
        speaking, even if it doesn't you may be OK; ratings are not always a
        limit on actual performance.

        As to going too high, if the compressor has a variable pressure
        adjustment, set it to 125. If not, the responsibility is yours to
        watch the process and stop when 125 psi is reached. Per the above
        comment on ratings versus performance, DO NOT depend on a
        specification to be a limit.
        --
        Regards,
        Bill Combs <ttursine@...>
        http://home.earthlink.net/~ttursine
        --
        In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try
        to train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open
        oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog.
        - Edward Hoagland
        ===================================================
        On Jan 30, 2006, at 1:42 PM, TravelswCharlie wrote:

        > I bought a used "Campbell Hausfield Portable Air Tank" from a
        > campground neighbor, but I'm not sure how to use it.
        >
        > The label doesn't state a "capacity", but does say "WARNING! don't
        > fill above 125 PSI". It has a gauge that goes up to 160 PSI, with
        > all above 125 PSI showing the red danger zone.
        >
        > My first question is, can all this be simply worked out
        > mathematically?
        >
        > Right now, the gauge reads 60 pounds, and the tire I want to fill
        > will be full at 85 pounds. (I don't mean it needs 85 pounds; it
        > needs about 10 pounds to be at the right pressure.)
        >
        > Does the above mean that this tank is "effectively" empty as far
        > as that tire is concerned?
        >
        > I have a "Sears Craftsman Air Compressor". The label on the side
        > reads:
        > 1.5 HP Air Delivery: 40 SCFM at 40 PSI
        > 2.9 SCFM at 90 PSI 120 volt 125 MAX
        >
        > Should it be possible to fill the air tank to 125 PSI with this
        > compressor, and with no danger of going too high?
        >
        > Thanks very much for any help,
        >
        > CJ





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • tw
        Yes. tom w. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 30, 2006
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          Yes.

          tom w.

          TravelswCharlie wrote:

          > I bought a used "Campbell Hausfield Portable Air Tank" from a
          > campground neighbor, but I'm not sure how to use it.
          >
          > The label doesn't state a "capacity", but does say "WARNING! don't
          > fill above 125 PSI". It has a gauge that goes up to 160 PSI, with
          > all above 125 PSI showing the red danger zone.
          >
          > My first question is, can all this be simply worked out
          > mathematically?
          >
          > Right now, the gauge reads 60 pounds, and the tire I want to fill
          > will be full at 85 pounds. (I don't mean it needs 85 pounds; it
          > needs about 10 pounds to be at the right pressure.)
          >
          > Does the above mean that this tank is "effectively" empty as far
          > as that tire is concerned?
          >
          > I have a "Sears Craftsman Air Compressor". The label on the side
          > reads:
          > 1.5 HP Air Delivery: 40 SCFM at 40 PSI
          > 2.9 SCFM at 90 PSI 120 volt 125 MAX
          >
          > Should it be possible to fill the air tank to 125 PSI with this
          > compressor, and with no danger of going too high?



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • TravelswCharlie
          Thank you, Bill and Tom. CJ ... From: TravelswCharlie To: Sent: Monday, January 30, 2006 12:42 PM
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 31, 2006
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            Thank you, Bill and Tom.

            CJ

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "TravelswCharlie" <travelswcharlie@...>
            To: <classicrv@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, January 30, 2006 12:42 PM
            Subject: [classicrv] How to use a portable air tank


            >I bought a used "Campbell Hausfield Portable Air Tank" from a
            > campground neighbor, but I'm not sure how to use it.
            >
            > The label doesn't state a "capacity", but does say "WARNING!
            > don't
            > fill above 125 PSI". It has a gauge that goes up to 160 PSI,
            > with
            > all above 125 PSI showing the red danger zone.
            >
            > My first question is, can all this be simply worked out
            > mathematically?
            >
            > Right now, the gauge reads 60 pounds, and the tire I want to
            > fill
            > will be full at 85 pounds. (I don't mean it needs 85 pounds; it
            > needs about 10 pounds to be at the right pressure.)
            >
            > Does the above mean that this tank is "effectively" empty as far
            > as that tire is concerned?
            >
            > I have a "Sears Craftsman Air Compressor". The label on the
            > side
            > reads:
            > 1.5 HP Air Delivery: 40 SCFM at 40 PSI
            > 2.9 SCFM at 90 PSI 120 volt 125 MAX
            >
            > Should it be possible to fill the air tank to 125 PSI with this
            > compressor, and with no danger of going too high?
            >
            > Thanks very much for any help,
            >
            > CJ
            >
            > Check my blog for "Birding and RVing in the Rio Grande Valley of
            > Texas", links to the most beautiful bird photos you've ever
            > seen.
            > and a map with RV Parks locations in the Valley.
            > http://camping-and-rv-travel-adventures.blogspot.com/
            >
          • Jack Rabon
            The tire will fill the tank with 75 in the tire & 60 in the tank. You can use any compressor to put more air in the tank, just watch the gauge & stop at 125
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 1, 2006
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              The tire will fill the tank with 75 in the tire & 60 in the tank.

              You can use any compressor to put more air in the tank, just watch the
              gauge & stop at 125 psi. Perhaps a little less in case the gauge is not
              accurate.

              But you need more than 90 or so to till the tire to 85. Higher pressure in
              the tank makes the tire fill faster, but don't rely on the pressure gauge
              for the air pressure in the tire.

              Stop filling the tire & check it with a tire pressure gauge. Then you can
              judge about how much more it needs.

              Jack
            • Sherri D
              The baby is still at the shop. It was too much to hope for to get a clean bill of health, but at least this time we are more assured of having a well
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 1, 2006
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                The 'baby' is still at the shop. It was too much to hope for to get a
                clean bill of health, but at least this time we are more assured of
                having a well running vehicle when all is said and done. The worst is a
                seal leak that they are replacing. The plugs were fouled and tranny
                fluid wasn't as bad as last year's class B fiasco, but still needs to be
                flushed. New fuel filter and belts and $1900 we should be good to go
                for the season.

                I wonder about the roof. Since it is not leaking now, we wish to keep
                it that way. :) So how often do you re-seal a rubber roof? Just
                curious. Again, this is a 1995 and has been stored in a barn during the
                off season. We are thinking of caulking all the seams on the roof edges
                as well as around the windows too, to be sure it is as tight as we can
                keep it.

                Do you folks with rubber coated roofs re-do them very often? If so, how
                often? What is your favorite product? What product will you never use
                again?

                This will be in sun and rain, and at most a dusting of snow once every
                five to ten years.

                thanks all!
                Sherri
                who just wants "Baby" to come home so she can play house :)

                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • TravelswCharlie
                Thanks, Jack. Keeping the right pressure in my tires has been my biggest problem as a motorhome owner. I can t seem to get the hang of testing the pressure
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 3, 2006
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                  Thanks, Jack.

                  Keeping the right pressure in my tires has been my biggest problem
                  as a motorhome owner. I can't seem to get the hang of testing the
                  pressure without letting out more air than I've put in, especially
                  with the inside dual.

                  I've purchased half a dozen different tire pressure gauges. I
                  even bought one that "talks". I thought I was going to be able
                  to stick my hand in to the inside tire and hold the thing down
                  until it says "85!", but nope... it doesn't say a word until you
                  take it off... where you could read it anyway, THEN it talks!
                  [sigh!]

                  But... despite all that, I didn't really expect to rely on the
                  pressure gage on the tank... I was just trying to work it out
                  mathmatically, so I could be sure I was describing it properly.

                  Thanks again,

                  CJ

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Jack Rabon" <rabonj@...>
                  To: <classicrv@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 4:34 PM
                  Subject: [classicrv] RE: How to use a portable air tank


                  > The tire will fill the tank with 75 in the tire & 60 in the
                  > tank.
                  >
                  > You can use any compressor to put more air in the tank, just
                  > watch the
                  > gauge & stop at 125 psi. Perhaps a little less in case the
                  > gauge is not
                  > accurate.
                  >
                  > But you need more than 90 or so to till the tire to 85. Higher
                  > pressure in
                  > the tank makes the tire fill faster, but don't rely on the
                  > pressure gauge
                  > for the air pressure in the tire.
                  >
                  > Stop filling the tire & check it with a tire pressure gauge.
                  > Then you can
                  > judge about how much more it needs.
                  >
                  > Jack
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Duane
                  You can buy stem extenders that bring them to the outside.
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 3, 2006
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                    You can buy stem extenders that bring them to the outside.





                    --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "TravelswCharlie"
                    <travelswcharlie@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks, Jack.
                    >
                    > Keeping the right pressure in my tires has been my biggest problem
                    > as a motorhome owner. I can't seem to get the hang of testing the
                    > pressure without letting out more air than I've put in, especially
                    > with the inside dual.
                    >
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