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Using furnace while driving

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  • Edwards, Kerry
    I think I would use my furnace while driving as long as I had a functional carbon monoxide detector. I think the biggest problem would be getting proper
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 26, 2005
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      I think I would use my furnace while driving as long as I had a functional carbon monoxide detector. I think the biggest problem would be getting proper venting and a carbon monoxide detector should avoid any problems in that regard. I don't see a big difference between operating the heater while going down the highway and operating it at a standstill in a high wind. The only other consideration might be the consequences of a collison while the furnace is operating.
      I'm considering installing a wall mount propane heater in place of the traditional furnace because I don't like having to depend on an electrically driven blower.

      Kerry


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • bob woods
      I m considering installing a wall mount propane heater in place of the traditional furnace because I don t like having to depend on an electrically driven
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 26, 2005
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        I'm considering installing a wall mount propane heater in place of the
        traditional furnace because I don't like having to depend on an
        electrically driven blower.

        Kerry

        If you are talking about the unvented units that hang on the wall,
        better get two detectors. They are not made for use in small rooms,
        bedrooms or RV's. They do however have an O2 sensor to detect unsafe
        conditions. Extremely efficient as none of the heat goes up the vent as
        there is no vent..



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      • Duane
        All rv furnaces don t have the danger of putting CO back into the rig as the units are sealed combustion units that draw their combustion air from outside the
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 26, 2005
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          All rv furnaces don't have the danger of putting CO back into the
          rig as the units are sealed combustion units that draw their
          combustion air from outside the rig, and also dispel the exhaust
          gases to the outside. It is a dual intake/exhaust set-up. The only
          problem would be if the windows were left open and sucked carbon
          monoxide back into the rig thru the window while you were moving
          down the road. About using a wall type heater - be sure it is also a
          sealed combustion unit. For instance a catalytic type heater
          requires that you leave a window cracked open to obtain it's
          combustion air. We just had a case here in Oregon at Crater Lake
          where a couple died because they left a propane lantern going for
          heat - result - asphyxiation!!! I believe that the recommendation
          by the manufacturers not to operate propane devices is in case of an
          accident that might break the lines and possibly cause an explosion.

          Dad








          --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "Edwards, Kerry"
          <kerry.edwards@r...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > I think I would use my furnace while driving as long as I had a
          functional carbon monoxide detector. I think the biggest problem
          would be getting proper venting and a carbon monoxide detector
          should avoid any problems in that regard. I don't see a big
          difference between operating the heater while going down the highway
          and operating it at a standstill in a high wind. The only other
          consideration might be the consequences of a collison while the
          furnace is operating.
          > I'm considering installing a wall mount propane heater in place of
          the traditional furnace because I don't like having to depend on an
          electrically driven blower.
          >
          > Kerry
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • mike logan
          sorry to hear about that couple but also lanterns are not designed to be used as heaters and i believe they have warnings on them not to use in a small
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 26, 2005
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            sorry to hear about that couple but also lanterns are
            not designed to be used as heaters and i believe they
            have warnings on them not to use in a small inclosed
            spaces

            --- Duane <deschwar@...> wrote:

            > All rv furnaces don't have the danger of putting CO
            > back into the
            > rig as the units are sealed combustion units that
            > draw their
            > combustion air from outside the rig, and also dispel
            > the exhaust
            > gases to the outside. It is a dual intake/exhaust
            > set-up. The only
            > problem would be if the windows were left open and
            > sucked carbon
            > monoxide back into the rig thru the window while you
            > were moving
            > down the road. About using a wall type heater - be
            > sure it is also a
            > sealed combustion unit. For instance a catalytic
            > type heater
            > requires that you leave a window cracked open to
            > obtain it's
            > combustion air. We just had a case here in Oregon at
            > Crater Lake
            > where a couple died because they left a propane
            > lantern going for
            > heat - result - asphyxiation!!! I believe that the
            > recommendation
            > by the manufacturers not to operate propane devices
            > is in case of an
            > accident that might break the lines and possibly
            > cause an explosion.
            >
            > Dad
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "Edwards, Kerry"
            > <kerry.edwards@r...> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > I think I would use my furnace while driving as
            > long as I had a
            > functional carbon monoxide detector. I think the
            > biggest problem
            > would be getting proper venting and a carbon
            > monoxide detector
            > should avoid any problems in that regard. I don't
            > see a big
            > difference between operating the heater while going
            > down the highway
            > and operating it at a standstill in a high wind.
            > The only other
            > consideration might be the consequences of a
            > collison while the
            > furnace is operating.
            > > I'm considering installing a wall mount propane
            > heater in place of
            > the traditional furnace because I don't like having
            > to depend on an
            > electrically driven blower.
            > >
            > > Kerry
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
            > removed]
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >





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          • davidkerryedwards
            I believe most of the wall mount heaters have 02 sensors that shut them off if the oxygen level drops below a certain percentage. I had a propane gas heater
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 28, 2005
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              I believe most of the wall mount heaters have 02 sensors that shut
              them off if the oxygen level drops below a certain percentage. I had
              a propane gas heater without a blower in my Mercedes motorhome I owned
              in the UK for a couple of years. It was about 22' and the heater kept
              it quite warm. It strikes me as thoughless to install a heating
              system that requires electricity in a vehicle that could frequently be
              used in conditions where electricity is not available when alternative
              heating systems exist. I'd really like a gravity fed hydronic heating
              system fired by a tankless hot water heater but to my knowledge no US
              company has been that innovative.
              You don't even need a heater to asphyxiate. A group of us almost
              asphyxiated in a 4 person single wall tent one night during a
              rainstorm. The water slicked down all the windows and doors stopping
              all incoming air. Luckily someone woke up. The year afterwards, two
              young boys were not as lucky and died under similar circumstances.

              --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, mike logan <mountainmanmike151@y...>
              wrote:
              >
              > sorry to hear about that couple but also lanterns are
              > not designed to be used as heaters and i believe they
              > have warnings on them not to use in a small inclosed
              > spaces
              >
              > --- Duane <deschwar@h...> wrote:
              >
              > > All rv furnaces don't have the danger of putting CO
              > > back into the
              > > rig as the units are sealed combustion units that
              > > draw their
              > > combustion air from outside the rig, and also dispel
              > > the exhaust
              > > gases to the outside. It is a dual intake/exhaust
              > > set-up. The only
              > > problem would be if the windows were left open and
              > > sucked carbon
              > > monoxide back into the rig thru the window while you
              > > were moving
              > > down the road. About using a wall type heater - be
              > > sure it is also a
              > > sealed combustion unit. For instance a catalytic
              > > type heater
              > > requires that you leave a window cracked open to
              > > obtain it's
              > > combustion air. We just had a case here in Oregon at
              > > Crater Lake
              > > where a couple died because they left a propane
              > > lantern going for
              > > heat - result - asphyxiation!!! I believe that the
              > > recommendation
              > > by the manufacturers not to operate propane devices
              > > is in case of an
              > > accident that might break the lines and possibly
              > > cause an explosion.
              > >
              > > Dad
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "Edwards, Kerry"
              > > <kerry.edwards@r...> wrote:
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > I think I would use my furnace while driving as
              > > long as I had a
              > > functional carbon monoxide detector. I think the
              > > biggest problem
              > > would be getting proper venting and a carbon
              > > monoxide detector
              > > should avoid any problems in that regard. I don't
              > > see a big
              > > difference between operating the heater while going
              > > down the highway
              > > and operating it at a standstill in a high wind.
              > > The only other
              > > consideration might be the consequences of a
              > > collison while the
              > > furnace is operating.
              > > > I'm considering installing a wall mount propane
              > > heater in place of
              > > the traditional furnace because I don't like having
              > > to depend on an
              > > electrically driven blower.
              > > >
              > > > Kerry
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > > removed]
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > __________________________________
              > Yahoo! for Good - Make a difference this year.
              > http://brand.yahoo.com/cybergivingweek2005/
              >
            • mike logan
              sounds like u used up all the oxygen because of the rain closing all the screening holes up ... __________________________________________ Yahoo! DSL –
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 28, 2005
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                sounds like u used up all the oxygen because of the
                rain closing all the screening holes up



                > You don't even need a heater to asphyxiate. A group
                > of us almost
                > asphyxiated in a 4 person single wall tent one night
                > during a
                > rainstorm. The water slicked down all the windows
                > and doors stopping
                > all incoming air. Luckily someone woke up. The
                > year afterwards, two
                > young boys were not as lucky and died under similar
                > circumstances.
                >
                > --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, mike logan
                > <mountainmanmike151@y...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > sorry to hear about that couple but also lanterns
                > are
                > > not designed to be used as heaters and i believe
                > they
                > > have warnings on them not to use in a small
                > inclosed
                > > spaces
                > >
                > > --- Duane <deschwar@h...> wrote:
                > >
                > > > All rv furnaces don't have the danger of putting
                > CO
                > > > back into the
                > > > rig as the units are sealed combustion units
                > that
                > > > draw their
                > > > combustion air from outside the rig, and also
                > dispel
                > > > the exhaust
                > > > gases to the outside. It is a dual
                > intake/exhaust
                > > > set-up. The only
                > > > problem would be if the windows were left open
                > and
                > > > sucked carbon
                > > > monoxide back into the rig thru the window while
                > you
                > > > were moving
                > > > down the road. About using a wall type heater -
                > be
                > > > sure it is also a
                > > > sealed combustion unit. For instance a catalytic
                > > > type heater
                > > > requires that you leave a window cracked open to
                > > > obtain it's
                > > > combustion air. We just had a case here in
                > Oregon at
                > > > Crater Lake
                > > > where a couple died because they left a propane
                > > > lantern going for
                > > > heat - result - asphyxiation!!! I believe that
                > the
                > > > recommendation
                > > > by the manufacturers not to operate propane
                > devices
                > > > is in case of an
                > > > accident that might break the lines and possibly
                > > > cause an explosion.
                > > >
                > > > Dad
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "Edwards,
                > Kerry"
                > > > <kerry.edwards@r...> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > I think I would use my furnace while driving
                > as
                > > > long as I had a
                > > > functional carbon monoxide detector. I think
                > the
                > > > biggest problem
                > > > would be getting proper venting and a carbon
                > > > monoxide detector
                > > > should avoid any problems in that regard. I
                > don't
                > > > see a big
                > > > difference between operating the heater while
                > going
                > > > down the highway
                > > > and operating it at a standstill in a high wind.
                >
                > > > The only other
                > > > consideration might be the consequences of a
                > > > collison while the
                > > > furnace is operating.
                > > > > I'm considering installing a wall mount
                > propane
                > > > heater in place of
                > > > the traditional furnace because I don't like
                > having
                > > > to depend on an
                > > > electrically driven blower.
                > > > >
                > > > > Kerry
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                > > > removed]
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > __________________________________
                > > Yahoo! for Good - Make a difference this year.
                > > http://brand.yahoo.com/cybergivingweek2005/
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >




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