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Re: [classicrv] Re: 1979 Minnie Winnie-Dodge-windshield wipers

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  • Bill Combs
    ... The nylon bushings, which are packed with lubricant, have been in use by Dodge since at least 1967; they are present on my 67 Coronet R/T and are also
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 7, 2004
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      On Oct 6, 2004, at 7:48 PM, denisond3d3 wrote:

      > But about 1980 or possibly 1979, mopar started using wiper linkages
      > with nylon bushings in many of their products.   Those give out from
      > old age, UV damage, and from the wiper pivots getting stiff with rust.
      > Then the linkage falls apart!  If that is what you have, its not too
      > hard to renew. 
      >   My local auto parts place was able to order in a few of those -wiper
      > linkage bushings- for my 1980 omni and 1987 dodge minivan.  It took
      > one day and they were very cheap.  I put the bushings into boiling
      > water for a couple minutes, then was able to push them into the
      > linkage arms with pliers.  They might also be called -grommets-.
      > Whitish nylon goodies.

      The nylon bushings, which are packed with lubricant, have been in use
      by Dodge since at least 1967; they are present on my '67 Coronet R/T
      and are also used on my '77 B200 van. Most Dodge dealers still have
      these bushings in their parts department.

      BTW, boiling the parts will remove the lube and seriously hamper the
      bushings' efficiency and longevity. A pair of pliers or strong fingers
      is enough to install: they snap into the linkage arms.
      --
      Regards,
      Bill Combs <ttursine@...>
      http://home.earthlink.net/~ttursine
      ---
      1975 Superior 2800, "Old Blue"
      ---
      If it ain't broke, fix it till it is.
    • Anne Trowbridge
      Great response!. Yes, I thought i would get some of those plastic grommets--that was definitely the problem. The grommet failed while the wipers were moving
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 12, 2004
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        Great response!. Yes, I thought i would get some of
        those plastic grommets--that was definitely the
        problem. The grommet failed while the wipers were
        moving fast, and the driver side wiper still being
        attached somehow, but wrongly, to the tie rod, the
        resistance burned out the motor. At least, we think
        that is what happened. Fixed with new motor $$$$$.

        I am defilnitely going to buy a bunch of new grommets
        and check it frequently. This was ridiculous--and
        expensive repair because a three dollar part failed!!

        Thanks. Anne




        --- Bill Combs <ttursine@...> wrote:

        > On Oct 6, 2004, at 7:48 PM, denisond3d3 wrote:
        >
        > > But about 1980 or possibly 1979, mopar started
        > using wiper linkages
        > > with nylon bushings in many of their products.��
        > Those give out from
        > > old age, UV damage, and from the wiper pivots
        > getting stiff with rust.
        > > Then the linkage falls apart!� If that is what
        > you have, its not too
        > > hard to renew.�
        > > � My local auto parts place was able to order in
        > a few of those -wiper
        > > linkage bushings- for my 1980 omni and 1987 dodge
        > minivan.� It took
        > > one day and they were very cheap.� I put the
        > bushings into boiling
        > > water for a couple minutes, then was able to push
        > them into the
        > > linkage arms with pliers.� They might also be
        > called -grommets-.
        > > Whitish nylon goodies.
        >
        > The nylon bushings, which are packed with lubricant,
        > have been in use
        > by Dodge since at least 1967; they are present on my
        > '67 Coronet R/T
        > and are also used on my '77 B200 van. Most Dodge
        > dealers still have
        > these bushings in their parts department.
        >
        > BTW, boiling the parts will remove the lube and
        > seriously hamper the
        > bushings' efficiency and longevity. A pair of pliers
        > or strong fingers
        > is enough to install: they snap into the linkage
        > arms.
        > --
        > Regards,
        > Bill Combs <ttursine@...>
        > http://home.earthlink.net/~ttursine
        > ---
        > 1975 Superior 2800, "Old Blue"
        > ---
        > If it ain't broke, fix it till it is.
        >
      • Anne Trowbridge
        Yep, it was a little part that failed. I am going to get more to have on hand, and also learn more about how this stuff goes together generally, so that I know
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 12, 2004
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          Yep, it was a little part that failed. I am going to
          get more to have on hand, and also learn more about
          how this stuff goes together generally, so that I know
          what to keep an eye on. If I had been checking to see
          if that little grommet was heat deformed, I could have
          saved a lot of trouble and money. Thanks, Anne


          --- Frogmobile <frogmobile@...> wrote:

          > Most auto parts stores carry a line of products
          > packaged on red cards,
          > hanging on pegs. The brand name is "Help!". The
          > wiper pivots come two to
          > a pack, for about a buck and a half.
          >
          > A few years back, I was driving in a rainstorm when
          > one of my wipers
          > stopped working. I pulled into a parking garage to
          > stay dry while I looked
          > at it. and sure enough, it was the pivot. I drove
          > to the nearest Dodge
          > dealer's parts department. As I walked into the
          > door, the counter guy saw
          > what I had in my hand, and said, "I bet you need one
          > of these", pulling one
          > out of a small bin kept next to his computer screen.
          > There were no other
          > parts on the counter; that's how common of a problem
          > they are. Dealer cost
          > was about a buck.
          >
          > If you need to do one, it might not be a bad idea to
          > do them all.
          >
          > Jay
          >
          > At 06:48 PM 10/6/04, you wrote:
          >
          >
          > >--- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "t02138"
          > <t02138@y...> wrote:
          > > > Help. My windshield wipers fell apart, and the
          > parts store says there
          > > > are no replacement parts............
          > >
          > > If your linkage is like the B100-B300 vans of
          > the early 70s, then
          > >some salvage yards should have one of the vans -
          > they were pretty
          > >common.
          > > But about 1980 or possibly 1979, mopar started
          > using wiper linkages
          > >with nylon bushings in many of their products.
          > Those give out from
          > >old age, UV damage, and from the wiper pivots
          > getting stiff with rust.
          > >Then the linkage falls apart! If that is what you
          > have, its not too
          > >hard to renew.
          > > My local auto parts place was able to order in a
          > few of those -wiper
          > >linkage bushings- for my 1980 omni and 1987 dodge
          > minivan. It took
          > >one day and they were very cheap. I put the
          > bushings into boiling
          > >water for a couple minutes, then was able to push
          > them into the
          > >linkage arms with pliers. They might also be
          > called -grommets-.
          > >Whitish nylon goodies.
          > > I also removed the wiper pivots and soaked
          > them in oil, worked
          > >them back and forth till they moved easily.
          > >
          >
          >
        • denisond3d3
          ... Yep, it was a little part that failed........... Its a continuing guessing game - what is going to fail next, on a 25 year old vehicle? A turn signal
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 13, 2004
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            --- I Anne Trowbridge <t02138@y...> wrote:
            Yep, it was a little part that failed...........

            Its a continuing guessing game - what is going to fail next, on
            a 25 year old vehicle? A turn signal bulb? A connecting rod bearing?
            I keep a log of all the parts I have replaced, with the date and
            mileage. I also keep a list of the replaceable parts that are
            original, or at least that I have not replaced, and I plan for
            replacing them in my driveway at my leisure -- to forestall failures
            while on vacation. This and other vintage RV sites help contribute
            to my list of things to renew. Whenever someone has a problem with
            their old rig, I add the part that caused their problem to my list of
            suspects.
            In the 13 years of my ownership, I have replaced the fuel pump,
            alternator, power steering pump, power steering hoses, belts, water
            pump bearings, removed the radiator for cleaning/recoring, new
            radiator hoses, the wheel cylinders, master cylinder, handbrake
            cable, among other parts, and have begun to replace some of these a
            2nd time; the wheel cylinders for example. I replaced the crankshaft
            seals - at 91k miles, because they were old, not because of the miles
            covered. My tranny works fine, but drips from its old seals, so I
            have to check the fluid periodically.
            Some things you can just remove, clean, lube and reassemble, like
            the shifter cable, speedometer cable, to last maybe another 30
            years.
            This summer I removed the center driveshaft support bearing, and put
            it back in again when I found it to be snug and silky smooth. I was
            not willing to ignore an important 30 year old bearing that you cant
            lubricate - only replace.
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