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Re: Has anyone used Marine Tex on RV siding?

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  • Rich
    Well, I have wet sanded and primered and painted Bondo filler for many years w/o any of those problems. But your reply warranted a trip out to the shop to read
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 3, 2004
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      Well, I have wet sanded and primered and painted Bondo filler for
      many years w/o any of those problems. But your reply warranted a trip
      out to the shop to read the instruction a new can of "Bondo" and I
      couldn't find anything about it not being waterproof, and it also
      said that it can be wet sanded and then primered w/ 2 coats. So goes
      it I guess.

      RJ



      --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "Sterling Voth" <recreation@i...>
      wrote:
      > Bondo itself will absorb water so needs to be kept strictly water
      free until
      > it is actually painted over. (no wet sanding of it or primer
      sprayed over
      > it)
      > Reason for this is that tiny bits of moisture that will retain
      in the
      > bondo pores will turn to vapor on a real hot day and cause the
      paint to
      > bubble over that point. Doesn't always happen of course, but does
      quite
      > often.
      > You can use the green fiberglass reinforced body filler in
      place of the
      > bondo as is much harder, sticks better, and is totally
      waterproof. :-)
      > Often known as "Kitty Hair" which I think is one of the brands of
      it just as
      > Bondo is actually just one brand of the "plastic body filler". As
      long as
      > the surface is properly prepped and roughed up both will stick
      firmly with
      > few problems.
      >
      > Sterling.........
      >
      > ----------
      > >From: "Rich" <RJgonfshin@s...>
      > >To: classicrv@yahoogroups.com
      > >Subject: [classicrv] Re: Has anyone used Marine Tex on RV siding?
      > >Date: Thu, Sep 2, 2004, 3:52 PM
      > >
      >
      > > "Bondo", or the plastic auto body filler that it is, is quite
      > > flexable, and able to withstand vibration and some movement, but
      only
      > > to a point I'm sure. I don't read the directions very good, but
      > > automobiles are made to be outdoors, so I would bet the Bondo is
      too.
      > > But it does get primered and painted when finished.
      > >
      > > RJ
    • Sterling Voth
      I too have seen those instructions on the Bondo and we used to do the same with it as well. I equate their instructions to the standard rtv silicone rubber
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 4, 2004
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        I too have seen those instructions on the Bondo and we used to do the same
        with it as well. I equate their instructions to the standard rtv silicone
        rubber claiming to work on all sorts of stuff that it is not always good for
        as well. Down in Louisiana and other parts of the deep south where the
        humidity hovers around 90 percent most of the time it is virtually
        impossible for all the water from wet sanding, washing, etc. to evaporate
        from the bondo as the porosity of the bondo type fillers trap the moisture.
        Few of the better body shops there will wet sand the stuff and always use a
        solvent and tack rags to wipe it down with until it has been thoroughly
        primered with a waterproof primer. Then the entire vehicle can be wet
        sanded. Too many paint failures from the moisture resurfacing and bubbling
        the paint cause them to eventually stop letting it get wet.
        In a very humid environment you can put a car out in the sun to dry and
        the body filler can get hot and appear totally dry, but there are still tiny
        pockets of moisture down in there that would take many hours to evaporate
        out and few have the time to leave it that long. Here in parts of Soothern
        California, most places have low humidity and you can get away with that if
        you give it enough hours to dry out before priming or painting. The
        difference between the air humidity and the humidity of the bondo is
        greater.
        Using the fiberglass reinforced type of body filler solves the problems
        because it is totally waterproof and does not cause that trouble. Back in
        Louisiana with it alternating from rain to sun and back again in short
        order, combined with the high humidity, it could take you weeks to get the
        moisture out of the bondo with the car protected in a garage and few have
        the time to wait while doing repairs. That is why I don't recommend folks
        use it in that manner. Bondo is great stuff, and I still use it sometimes
        myself. It is certainly waterproof in the fact that it won't disolve, and
        won't come off by being exposed to water as once it hardens is hard for
        life. It is just that the porosity of it can cause problems that aren't
        warned about on the can. Tecnhically they are correct in their instructions
        just as the RTV silicone makers are when they say that their product sticks
        to aluminum, glass, wood, etc. In practice though that is not always true
        as most of us who have used RTV to seal trailers are aware. Just my two
        cents! :-)
        Sterling.........

        ----------
        >From: "Rich" <RJgonfshin@...>
        >To: classicrv@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [classicrv] Re: Has anyone used Marine Tex on RV siding?
        >Date: Fri, Sep 3, 2004, 9:44 PM
        >

        > Well, I have wet sanded and primered and painted Bondo filler for
        > many years w/o any of those problems. But your reply warranted a trip
        > out to the shop to read the instruction a new can of "Bondo" and I
        > couldn't find anything about it not being waterproof, and it also
        > said that it can be wet sanded and then primered w/ 2 coats. So goes
        > it I guess.
        >
        > RJ
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "Sterling Voth" <recreation@i...>
        > wrote:
        >> Bondo itself will absorb water so needs to be kept strictly water
        > free until
        >> it is actually painted over. (no wet sanding of it or primer
        > sprayed over
        >> it)
        >> Reason for this is that tiny bits of moisture that will retain
        > in the
        >> bondo pores will turn to vapor on a real hot day and cause the
        > paint to
        >> bubble over that point. Doesn't always happen of course, but does
        > quite
        >> often.
        >> You can use the green fiberglass reinforced body filler in
        > place of the
        >> bondo as is much harder, sticks better, and is totally
        > waterproof. :-)
        >> Often known as "Kitty Hair" which I think is one of the brands of
        > it just as
        >> Bondo is actually just one brand of the "plastic body filler". As
        > long as
        >> the surface is properly prepped and roughed up both will stick
        > firmly with
        >> few problems.
        >>
        >> Sterling.........
        >>
        >> ----------
        >> >From: "Rich" <RJgonfshin@s...>
        >> >To: classicrv@yahoogroups.com
        >> >Subject: [classicrv] Re: Has anyone used Marine Tex on RV siding?
        >> >Date: Thu, Sep 2, 2004, 3:52 PM
        >> >
        >>
        >> > "Bondo", or the plastic auto body filler that it is, is quite
        >> > flexable, and able to withstand vibration and some movement, but
        > only
        >> > to a point I'm sure. I don't read the directions very good, but
        >> > automobiles are made to be outdoors, so I would bet the Bondo is
        > too.
        >> > But it does get primered and painted when finished.
        >> >
        >> > RJ
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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