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Re: [classicrv] Carburetor Problems..........

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  • Jim Hodges
    I suppose it does have electric choke. I have only attempted one time to adjust the fast idle and helped it somewhat, but it has never run right until it gets
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 7, 2003
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      I suppose it does have electric choke. I have only attempted one time to adjust the fast idle and helped it somewhat, but it has never run right until it gets warmed up. I sprayed carburetor cleaner on it recently, as I thought it was sticking but it hasn't helped, apparently.
      When mine gets warm and running right, it still has a less than smooth idle, but more like an engine with a mild cam for racing. Shop that installed the rebuilt carb said that was typical of a 440 engine.
      Manuel Domingos <mdomingo@...> wrote:Do you have the electric choke? Mine is set to the factory recomended notch,
      and it still starts hard after sitting and runs rough on start up. Smooths
      out when hot though.
      Manny
      72 Superior 2200
      413
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <astrolark@...>
      To: <classicrv@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, February 07, 2003 11:14 PM
      Subject: [classicrv] Carburetor Problems..........


      > I have a 1973 Superior 2200 motorhome. When I first got it I had a
      > factory-rebuilt carburetor installed and it worked much better than
      > the old one, but thinking back, it has always been a little hard to
      > start. I usually have to make about three or four attempts,
      > cranking a few seconds and stopping, before it starts. BTW, it has
      > a Dodge 440 engine, with 4 barrel carburetor. After it starts it
      > runs rough like it is partially flooded until it warms up, IF it
      > gets that far. If you don't keep goosing the pedal, it will die on
      > you. I wonder if the fast idle mechanism is working properly? Maybe
      > it isn't properly adjusted.
      >
      > Does anybody know of a website that describes how to adjust this
      > kind of carburetor?
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > classicrv-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >



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    • bucky
      Sounds like your goosing the pedal is keeping it running because the accelerator pump is a squirting in a big stream of fuel. One thing that happens when a
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 8, 2003
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        Sounds like your goosing the pedal is keeping it running because the
        accelerator pump is a squirting in a big stream of fuel. One thing that
        happens when a carbureted vehicle sets is the fuel in the float bowls
        evaporates. If mine sets more than 2 or 3 weeks I turn it over for a few
        seconds to get the fuel pump a chance to refill the float bowls, stop, then
        pump the accelerator several times to get a few squirts of fuel in the
        intake. If you pump the accelerator before refilling the float bowls there
        may not be enough fuel to keep it running on the first start. Of course this
        assumes there is nothing wrong with your carburetor. When I got my motor
        home it had set for 2 years, all the gas had evaporated from the float bowls
        SICKING the floats to the bottom. Nothing would fix them without
        disassembly. Even after a complete rebuild it never would run correctly. If
        I looked down the carb while idling I could see huge random drops of fuel
        dripping into the intake. I replaced the carb and now at idle it's hard to
        see the fuel that drips in at idle; goose it and there is a nice even spray
        on both primaries.

        Also if you ever pull the intake you may consider using the gasket set that
        blocks the exhaust crossover ports. The engine may take longer to warm up
        but at least your not subjecting the carburetor to increased temperatures
        while on the road. Also if you don't have a cold air hose running from the
        air cleaner to somewhere in front of the radiator you should add one.
        Engines don't run as good if the are sucking the hot air trapped in the "dog
        box".

        Anyone with a small block Mopar (318 - 360) should definitely consider
        blocking the exhaust crossover - because it gets the underside of the intake
        so hot that oil frys to it then falls down in the engine as sludge.

        Bucky

        -----Original Message-----
        From: astrolark <astrolark@...> [mailto:astrolark@...]
        Sent: Friday, February 07, 2003 11:14 PM
        To: classicrv@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [classicrv] Carburetor Problems..........


        I have a 1973 Superior 2200 motorhome. When I first got it I had a
        factory-rebuilt carburetor installed and it worked much better than
        the old one, but thinking back, it has always been a little hard to
        start. I usually have to make about three or four attempts,
        cranking a few seconds and stopping, before it starts. BTW, it has
        a Dodge 440 engine, with 4 barrel carburetor. After it starts it
        runs rough like it is partially flooded until it warms up, IF it
        gets that far. If you don't keep goosing the pedal, it will die on
        you. I wonder if the fast idle mechanism is working properly? Maybe
        it isn't properly adjusted.

        Does anybody know of a website that describes how to adjust this
        kind of carburetor?


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        classicrv-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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      • Chuck
        ============================================================ From: Jim Hodges Date: 2003/02/07 Fri PM 11:42:23 EST To:
        Message 3 of 15 , Feb 8, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          ============================================================
          From: Jim Hodges <astrolark@...>
          Date: 2003/02/07 Fri PM 11:42:23 EST
          To: classicrv@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [classicrv] Carburetor Problems..........

          ============================================================
          On a hard starting when hot situation. I have been told that one cause can be a poor ground from engine to chassis. Either a loose bolt or rusty. Find that connection, take both ends loose and scrape, brush, and clean.

          Chuck


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jim Hodges
          Thanks for your input, Chuck. I will look into that. That might explain why it seems to have gotten slightly worse over time. Jim ... Chuck
          Message 4 of 15 , Feb 8, 2003
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            Thanks for your input, Chuck. I will look into that. That might explain why it seems to have gotten slightly worse over time.
            Jim
            :)

            Chuck <73winniebrave@...> wrote:
            ============================================================
            From: Jim Hodges <astrolark@...>
            Date: 2003/02/07 Fri PM 11:42:23 EST
            To: classicrv@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [classicrv] Carburetor Problems..........

            ============================================================
            On a hard starting when hot situation. I have been told that one cause can be a poor ground from engine to chassis. Either a loose bolt or rusty. Find that connection, take both ends loose and scrape, brush, and clean.

            Chuck


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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          • Jim Hodges
            Thank you for taking the time to explain all this to me. You along with several others have given me some things to check out and look into. My experience
            Message 5 of 15 , Feb 8, 2003
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              Thank you for taking the time to explain all this to me. You along with several others have given me some things to check out and look into. My experience has shown it to start much easier with less cranking if it is started every day or so, so what you say about evaporation of fuel might be the problem.

              Thanks again for all your suggestions.

              Jim

              :)




              bucky <buckys@...> wrote:Sounds like your goosing the pedal is keeping it running because the
              accelerator pump is a squirting in a big stream of fuel. One thing that
              happens when a carbureted vehicle sets is the fuel in the float bowls
              evaporates. If mine sets more than 2 or 3 weeks I turn it over for a few
              seconds to get the fuel pump a chance to refill the float bowls, stop, then
              pump the accelerator several times to get a few squirts of fuel in the
              intake. If you pump the accelerator before refilling the float bowls there
              may not be enough fuel to keep it running on the first start. Of course this
              assumes there is nothing wrong with your carburetor. When I got my motor
              home it had set for 2 years, all the gas had evaporated from the float bowls
              SICKING the floats to the bottom. Nothing would fix them without
              disassembly. Even after a complete rebuild it never would run correctly. If
              I looked down the carb while idling I could see huge random drops of fuel
              dripping into the intake. I replaced the carb and now at idle it's hard to
              see the fuel that drips in at idle; goose it and there is a nice even spray
              on both primaries.

              Also if you ever pull the intake you may consider using the gasket set that
              blocks the exhaust crossover ports. The engine may take longer to warm up
              but at least your not subjecting the carburetor to increased temperatures
              while on the road. Also if you don't have a cold air hose running from the
              air cleaner to somewhere in front of the radiator you should add one.
              Engines don't run as good if the are sucking the hot air trapped in the "dog
              box".

              Anyone with a small block Mopar (318 - 360) should definitely consider
              blocking the exhaust crossover - because it gets the underside of the intake
              so hot that oil frys to it then falls down in the engine as sludge.

              Bucky

              -----Original Message-----
              From: astrolark <astrolark@...> [mailto:astrolark@...]
              Sent: Friday, February 07, 2003 11:14 PM
              To: classicrv@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [classicrv] Carburetor Problems..........


              I have a 1973 Superior 2200 motorhome. When I first got it I had a
              factory-rebuilt carburetor installed and it worked much better than
              the old one, but thinking back, it has always been a little hard to
              start. I usually have to make about three or four attempts,
              cranking a few seconds and stopping, before it starts. BTW, it has
              a Dodge 440 engine, with 4 barrel carburetor. After it starts it
              runs rough like it is partially flooded until it warms up, IF it
              gets that far. If you don't keep goosing the pedal, it will die on
              you. I wonder if the fast idle mechanism is working properly? Maybe
              it isn't properly adjusted.

              Does anybody know of a website that describes how to adjust this
              kind of carburetor?


              To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              classicrv-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


              To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              classicrv-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


              People will forget what you said . . . people will forget what you did . . . but people will never forget how you made them feel.


              Jim


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              Yahoo! Mail Plus - Powerful. Affordable. Sign up now

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jack Rabon
              Part 1 Edelbrock had a great how to instruction booklet on their aftermarket carbs, with a copy on their web site: http://www.edelbrock.com/ I can t get you
              Message 6 of 15 , Feb 10, 2003
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                Part 1
                Edelbrock had a great "how to" instruction booklet on their aftermarket
                carbs, with a copy on their web site: http://www.edelbrock.com/

                I can't get you the exact link now, since their entire site appears to be
                down, or at least the DNS has the wrong entry for them. Try them later,
                then go to automotive, then performance products & I hope you will see the
                setup instructions.

                They included a graph of stock & optional jet sizes & metering rod
                combinations, along with lines for different altitudes above sea level.
                You can select power or economy, and set up for your preferred altitude,
                or at least get close before running the tests & looking at spark plug
                insulator color.

                Most of what they have there is good for other carburetors, at least the
                method can be used.

                Part 2
                From a long time with RB Chrysler engines, here is my sure fire method for
                starting the critter. It assumes the engine has not been started for a few
                days. By then, the fuel bowl will be empty, or nearly so.

                Most of your cranking time is spent filling the fuel bowl with the engine
                driven fuel pump. Save a bunch of time & install an in-line fuel pump with
                fuel filter between the tank & the engine driven pump. Put this pump on a
                switch, and let it fill the bowl for you. It will only take 10-15 seconds.

                I used an old Stewart Warner unit, which rapidly clicks while pumping, then
                slows to a single "tick" per second or so when the line is up to pressure.
                That will be when the fuel bowl is full & the needle valve shuts off the
                fuel entry.

                Now give the engine two full accelerator pumps, to squirt some fuel into
                the manifold using the accelerator pump. While you have the throttle at
                WOT position, open the manual choke. This allows the fast idle cam to
                freely turn. Now take your foot off the accelerator & turn off the
                electric fuel pump.

                A short side note: manual choke kits are only $10 or less from most
                discount parts houses, and I really think they solve a bunch of problems.
                You can set the exact dose of mixture enrichment, by listening to the
                engine after it starts. You can also be sure the choke is really fully
                open before you make a long trip & waste a bunch of fuel. In less than
                freezing weather, you can open the choke way before the automatic system
                would do so, saving soot on your plugs & saving some fuel. Hey, it is not
                getting any cheaper these days . . .

                Now back to the method. After the two "squirts", wait about 30 seconds for
                the fuel to evaporate inside the intake manifold. It cannot leave the
                manifold, since the throttle plate is closed. And it won't burn in the
                cylinders until it turns into a vapor.

                Give the engine a half squirt, and start cranking with your foot off the
                accelerator. You might be surprised when it takes less than a full
                revolution of the engine before it starts! Be sure to back off the choke a
                bit, until the engine is happy at idle.

                You can now ease on down the road. Do open the choke all the way, as soon
                as you can.

                If you like to idle for a bit before starting down the road, do so with the
                transmission in N, not P. The A727 automatic used on the big block engines
                does not circulate oil to the cooler & then on the bearings in Park. It
                does in all other gears, including Neutral.

                You can open the choke at idle sooner than you can during use, since the
                engine will idle with choke off sooner than it can take a bit of throttle
                when cold.

                This works on my 77 Dodge 440, 70 Executive with Dodge 413, and 78 Dodge
                400. Yeah, the 400 is only a B block, not an RB like the others, but it is
                a cousin to the raised B blocks.

                On our old 1070 Superior 2200, I put the choke button on the side of the
                engine dog house, way above the throttle foot, almost to the top, flat
                portion. There was already a hole there where some wires & hoses came out,
                and I used the bracket that came in the kit to mount the button there. Out
                of the way, but easy to reach for that cold morning start up.

                In mild weather, we found that the choke was not needed on a cold start.
                Just the fuel pump & the "squirts". I live in Florida, so most of the
                year was mild, but summers all over the country should be the same.

                That electric fuel pump can also help prevent vapor lock while stuck in
                slow moving or stop & go traffic.

                We had the same hard to turn over problem when trying a hot start. Fixed
                that with new engine battery, new battery cables, better ground
                connections, and a rebuild of the starter. It was mostly fixed with just
                the battery & cables, but good as new with the entire treatment.

                If you try this, let us all know how it goes for you.

                Jack

                -----Original Message-----
                Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 04:14:03 -0000
                From: "astrolark <astrolark@...>" <astrolark@...>
                Subject: Carburetor Problems..........

                I have a 1973 Superior 2200 motorhome. When I first got it I had a
                factory-rebuilt carburetor installed and it worked much better than
                the old one, but thinking back, it has always been a little hard to
                start. I usually have to make about three or four attempts,
                cranking a few seconds and stopping, before it starts. BTW, it has
                a Dodge 440 engine, with 4 barrel carburetor. After it starts it
                runs rough like it is partially flooded until it warms up, IF it
                gets that far. If you don't keep goosing the pedal, it will die on
                you. I wonder if the fast idle mechanism is working properly? Maybe
                it isn't properly adjusted.

                Does anybody know of a website that describes how to adjust this
                kind of carburetor?
              • Chappell, Joel B
                Sounds like the thing to do! I have a mix of MOPAR and GM stuff, but nothing I own has a good old Therm-o-quad on it. All my RV experience has been with P-30
                Message 7 of 15 , Feb 10, 2003
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                  Sounds like the thing to do!

                  I have a mix of MOPAR and GM stuff, but nothing I own has a good old
                  Therm-o-quad on it. All my RV experience has been with P-30 chassis and
                  454s. I do have a couple of friends that have older Braves, on Dodge
                  running gear, and both of them hated the Therm-o-quad with a passion. So
                  much so, that they did just that... they ripped off the manifold and
                  installed an Edelbrock manifold and carb. Both also installed Hedman headers
                  at the same time. Now they both are all smiles and their rigs start right up
                  and don't load up on damp days.

                  Joel in NH

                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: Jack Rabon [SMTP:rabonj@...]
                  > Sent: Monday, February 10, 2003 12:12 PM
                  > To: 'classicrv@yahoogroups.com'
                  > Cc: 'astrolark@...'
                  > Subject: [classicrv] Re: Carburetor Problems..........
                  >
                  > Part 1
                  > Edelbrock had a great "how to" instruction booklet on their aftermarket
                  > carbs, with a copy on their web site: http://www.edelbrock.com/
                  >
                  > I can't get you the exact link now, since their entire site appears to be
                  > down, or at least the DNS has the wrong entry for them. Try them later,
                  > then go to automotive, then performance products & I hope you will see the
                  >
                  > setup instructions.
                  >
                • Jim Hodges
                  Thank you for that very detailed advice on how to fix my starting problem. What you say seems to fit my situation and I would bet I will find you are right on
                  Message 8 of 15 , Feb 10, 2003
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thank you for that very detailed advice on how to fix my starting problem. What you say seems to fit my situation and I would bet I will find you are right on target when I get into it. With this and a lot of other good pointers from the other nice members of this group, I feel I can solve the problem, now.

                    Thanks,
                    Jim

                    Jack Rabon <rabonj@...> wrote:Part 1
                    Edelbrock had a great "how to" instruction booklet on their aftermarket
                    carbs, with a copy on their web site: http://www.edelbrock.com/

                    I can't get you the exact link now, since their entire site appears to be
                    down, or at least the DNS has the wrong entry for them. Try them later,
                    then go to automotive, then performance products & I hope you will see the
                    setup instructions.

                    They included a graph of stock & optional jet sizes & metering rod
                    combinations, along with lines for different altitudes above sea level.
                    You can select power or economy, and set up for your preferred altitude,
                    or at least get close before running the tests & looking at spark plug
                    insulator color.

                    Most of what they have there is good for other carburetors, at least the
                    method can be used.

                    Part 2
                    From a long time with RB Chrysler engines, here is my sure fire method for
                    starting the critter. It assumes the engine has not been started for a few
                    days. By then, the fuel bowl will be empty, or nearly so.

                    Most of your cranking time is spent filling the fuel bowl with the engine
                    driven fuel pump. Save a bunch of time & install an in-line fuel pump with
                    fuel filter between the tank & the engine driven pump. Put this pump on a
                    switch, and let it fill the bowl for you. It will only take 10-15 seconds.

                    I used an old Stewart Warner unit, which rapidly clicks while pumping, then
                    slows to a single "tick" per second or so when the line is up to pressure.
                    That will be when the fuel bowl is full & the needle valve shuts off the
                    fuel entry.

                    Now give the engine two full accelerator pumps, to squirt some fuel into
                    the manifold using the accelerator pump. While you have the throttle at
                    WOT position, open the manual choke. This allows the fast idle cam to
                    freely turn. Now take your foot off the accelerator & turn off the
                    electric fuel pump.

                    A short side note: manual choke kits are only $10 or less from most
                    discount parts houses, and I really think they solve a bunch of problems.
                    You can set the exact dose of mixture enrichment, by listening to the
                    engine after it starts. You can also be sure the choke is really fully
                    open before you make a long trip & waste a bunch of fuel. In less than
                    freezing weather, you can open the choke way before the automatic system
                    would do so, saving soot on your plugs & saving some fuel. Hey, it is not
                    getting any cheaper these days . . .

                    Now back to the method. After the two "squirts", wait about 30 seconds for
                    the fuel to evaporate inside the intake manifold. It cannot leave the
                    manifold, since the throttle plate is closed. And it won't burn in the
                    cylinders until it turns into a vapor.

                    Give the engine a half squirt, and start cranking with your foot off the
                    accelerator. You might be surprised when it takes less than a full
                    revolution of the engine before it starts! Be sure to back off the choke a
                    bit, until the engine is happy at idle.

                    You can now ease on down the road. Do open the choke all the way, as soon
                    as you can.

                    If you like to idle for a bit before starting down the road, do so with the
                    transmission in N, not P. The A727 automatic used on the big block engines
                    does not circulate oil to the cooler & then on the bearings in Park. It
                    does in all other gears, including Neutral.

                    You can open the choke at idle sooner than you can during use, since the
                    engine will idle with choke off sooner than it can take a bit of throttle
                    when cold.

                    This works on my 77 Dodge 440, 70 Executive with Dodge 413, and 78 Dodge
                    400. Yeah, the 400 is only a B block, not an RB like the others, but it is
                    a cousin to the raised B blocks.

                    On our old 1070 Superior 2200, I put the choke button on the side of the
                    engine dog house, way above the throttle foot, almost to the top, flat
                    portion. There was already a hole there where some wires & hoses came out,
                    and I used the bracket that came in the kit to mount the button there. Out
                    of the way, but easy to reach for that cold morning start up.

                    In mild weather, we found that the choke was not needed on a cold start.
                    Just the fuel pump & the "squirts". I live in Florida, so most of the
                    year was mild, but summers all over the country should be the same.

                    That electric fuel pump can also help prevent vapor lock while stuck in
                    slow moving or stop & go traffic.

                    We had the same hard to turn over problem when trying a hot start. Fixed
                    that with new engine battery, new battery cables, better ground
                    connections, and a rebuild of the starter. It was mostly fixed with just
                    the battery & cables, but good as new with the entire treatment.

                    If you try this, let us all know how it goes for you.

                    Jack

                    -----Original Message-----
                    Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 04:14:03 -0000
                    From: "astrolark <astrolark@...>" <astrolark@...>
                    Subject: Carburetor Problems..........

                    I have a 1973 Superior 2200 motorhome. When I first got it I had a
                    factory-rebuilt carburetor installed and it worked much better than
                    the old one, but thinking back, it has always been a little hard to
                    start. I usually have to make about three or four attempts,
                    cranking a few seconds and stopping, before it starts. BTW, it has
                    a Dodge 440 engine, with 4 barrel carburetor. After it starts it
                    runs rough like it is partially flooded until it warms up, IF it
                    gets that far. If you don't keep goosing the pedal, it will die on
                    you. I wonder if the fast idle mechanism is working properly? Maybe
                    it isn't properly adjusted.

                    Does anybody know of a website that describes how to adjust this
                    kind of carburetor?


                    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    classicrv-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                    People will forget what you said . . . people will forget what you did . . . but people will never forget how you made them feel.


                    Jim


                    ---------------------------------
                    Do you Yahoo!?
                    Yahoo! Shopping - Send Flowers for Valentine's Day

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • chuckyd111 <c-donaldson@attbi.com>
                    ... I ve been thinking about adding an electric fuel pump. One thing I wondered about is whether or not you need to add a fuel pressure regulator. I ve heard
                    Message 9 of 15 , Feb 10, 2003
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                      --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, Jack Rabon <rabonj@b...> wrote:
                      > I used an old Stewart Warner unit, which rapidly clicks
                      > while pumping, then slows to a single "tick" per second
                      > or so when the line is up to pressure.
                      > That will be when the fuel bowl is full & the needle valve
                      > shuts off the fuel entry.

                      I've been thinking about adding an electric fuel pump. One thing I
                      wondered about is whether or not you need to add a fuel pressure
                      regulator. I've heard that some electric fuel pumps can "overpower"
                      the needle valve in the carb. Is this true? I know that a good
                      mechanical fuel pump will produce less than 10 lbs. of pressure,
                      whereas an electric fuel pump (made for fuel injection) can produce
                      over 40lbs. Does the old Stewart Warner you mention produce a
                      relatively low fuel line pressure, so you don't need a regulator?
                      Are there new equivalents?
                    • Frogmobile
                      There are electric fuel pumps designed for carbureted applications. They work at a much lower pressure, which is needed to keep other parts of the system,
                      Message 10 of 15 , Feb 11, 2003
                      • 0 Attachment
                        There are electric fuel pumps designed for carbureted applications. They
                        work at a much lower pressure, which is needed to keep other parts of the
                        system, such as the needle and seat, from blowing out. They're also
                        typically cheaper than EFI pumps.

                        Remember also that the higher pressure pumps need fuel injection-capable
                        fuel line instead of the regular fuel line probably currently installed on
                        your rig.

                        Jay

                        At 04:51 AM 2/11/03 +0000, you wrote:
                        >--- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, Jack Rabon <rabonj@b...> wrote:
                        > > I used an old Stewart Warner unit, which rapidly clicks
                        > > while pumping, then slows to a single "tick" per second
                        > > or so when the line is up to pressure.
                        > > That will be when the fuel bowl is full & the needle valve
                        > > shuts off the fuel entry.
                        >
                        >I've been thinking about adding an electric fuel pump. One thing I
                        >wondered about is whether or not you need to add a fuel pressure
                        >regulator. I've heard that some electric fuel pumps can "overpower"
                        >the needle valve in the carb. Is this true? I know that a good
                        >mechanical fuel pump will produce less than 10 lbs. of pressure,
                        >whereas an electric fuel pump (made for fuel injection) can produce
                        >over 40lbs. Does the old Stewart Warner you mention produce a
                        >relatively low fuel line pressure, so you don't need a regulator?
                        >Are there new equivalents?
                      • Philip Saran <psaran@cox.net>
                        ... Yes you should run a fuel regulator set at about 7 lbs pressure. If for no other reason than safety. Phil Saran SOCAL
                        Message 11 of 15 , Feb 12, 2003
                        • 0 Attachment
                          --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, Frogmobile <frogmobile@e...> wrote:
                          > There are electric fuel pumps designed for carbureted applications.
                          > >I've been thinking about adding an electric fuel pump. One thing I
                          > >wondered about is whether or not you need to add a fuel pressure
                          > >regulator. I've heard that some electric fuel pumps can "overpower"
                          > >the needle valve in the carb. Is this true? I know that a good
                          > >mechanical fuel pump will produce less than 10 lbs. of pressure,
                          > >whereas an electric fuel pump (made for fuel injection) can produce
                          > >over 40lbs.

                          Yes you should run a fuel regulator set at about 7 lbs pressure.
                          If for no other reason than safety.

                          Phil Saran
                          SOCAL
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