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Group Description







The CFML is sponsored in part by Twin Arms Fencing, makers of custom Italian foils built to customer specifications. Now featuring conversion sets, pommels and wood grips.





The Classical Fencing Mailing List is a forum for discussing the art and practice of European-based classical and historical fencing.



While the term "Classical Fencing" refers to approximately the 19th century, styles and periods discussed on this list include any established European school (usually, but not necessarily, French, Italian, or Spanish) of civilian swordsmanship from the 15th-19th Centuries. Weapons include foil, épée, sabre, smallsword, and rapier & dagger.



With several hundred subscribers, including many experienced and knowledgable fencers and fencing masters with dozens of years of combined experience and knowledge of classical fencing and historical swordsmanship, the list represents a unique opportunity to share ideas and learn more about this rare martial art.



Please note that this list is NOT for discussing modern sport (i.e. Olympic-style) fencing, historical reenactment, stage combat, mythical/fantasy swordplay, military combat, or Eastern martial arts and sword forms, as other venues exist for discussing those topics.



To subscribe, send an empty message to classicalfencing-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



To UNsubscribe, send a message to classicalfencing-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



Subscribers may post a message by sending it to classicalfencing@yahoogroups.com

Group Information

  • 837
  • Fencing
  • Jun 25, 1998
  • English

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