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Re: Ref #9631 Bragg

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  • hank9174
    But Dave, you snipped out where I said what you, more or less, restated in your post: My criticism of Bragg is pretty much just that: too often he was distant
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 12, 2002
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      But Dave, you snipped out where I said what you, more or less,
      restated in your post:

      'My criticism of Bragg is pretty much just that: too often he was
      distant from the *planned* point of initial contact. It is best to be
      be where the fuse is lit and stifle any early confusion. A good horse
      moves faster than the tide of battle.'

      HankC


      --- In civilwarwest@y..., "dmsmith001" <dmsmith001@y...> wrote:
      > --- In civilwarwest@y..., "hank9174" <clarkc@m...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Boy, Connie, there's a lot to disagree with in one post ;)
      > >
      > > 'He never saw or took advantage of the opportunities' ! Actually,
      > > he placed his army in positions that did take advantage of
      > > opportunities.
      >
      > But Hank, you've damned your subject with faint praise.
      >
      > McClellan put his army in place to win a battle at Antietam, but
      > failed to do so.
      >
      > What I would encourage you to do is look past the simple battle
      plans
      > as laid out by Bragg, and look towards how he worked to solve
      > repetitive problems once they cropped up.
      >
      > For example, by McLemore's Cove, if Bragg were concerned that
      > Hindman, or DH Hill at Dug Gap, might not fullfil his orders, why
      did
      > he not move to Hindman to make sure his orders were carried out?
      >
      > One of my favorite things to note about Bragg is the absolute lack
      of
      > physical evidence of his presence at any of the major battles. Who
      > ever heard of him visiting Polk, or Hardee, or Longstreet during a
      > battle?
      >
      > If you're a supervisor, and you tell people to do certain things and
      > they have a history of not doing it, don't you make *sure* a future
      > order is carried out? Especially if you don't have permission to
      > fire those subordinates, unilaterally?
      >
      > snips
      >
      > > Other than cloning himself and being everywhere, a commander
      > > depends upon his subordinates to carry out orders. (period)
      >
      > Activity helps. Personal involvement. Some interpersonal skills
      > help, too.
      > >
      > > I'm not sure where military objectives were impacted by minutiae,
      > > outrage and disdain. However, Bragg was frequently outraged while
      > > waiting for the sounds of battle that he had ordered.
      >
      > And did what?
      > >
      > snips
      >
      > Dave
      >
      > Dave Smith
      > Villa Hills, KY
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