Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: RR in the south ( was Any good books ...)

Expand Messages
  • carlw4514
    here s something interesting just ran across and explains the motivation for the southern system s changing guage on their RRs in the ACW, which in wartime was
    Message 1 of 19 , Jan 5, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      here's something interesting just ran across and explains the
      motivation for the southern system's changing guage on their RRs in
      the ACW, which in wartime was a big problem: troops would have to
      disembark one line and wait to change to a different train in a
      different station in order to continue.
      -It's from
      http://www.continentallocating.com/Marmaduke.htm
      "...It had been decided to build a narrow gauge line instead of the
      standard gauge road. One strong argument for the "small" gauge in the
      south and southwest was that the bulk of traffic was cotton, which
      would be compressed and large quantities transported without the
      necessity of large rail cars..."





      --- In civilwarwest@y..., Aurelie1999@a... wrote:
      > I am absolutely fascinated with the strategic impact of railroads
      throughout
      > the war. What makes the entire story so fascinating is that
      railroads were
      > new and had never been covered at West Point. Yet the great rolling
      wheels
      > rapidly became tactical considerations, essential to effective
      strategic
      > planning and weapons in their own right. The tracks stitched the
      army to
      > their supplies and played a part in defeating the South by adding
      steam to
      > the West Point mantra of "celerity."
      >
      > Herman Haupt personified Yankee ingenuity when he built the
      cornstalk bridge
      > across Potomac Creek, developed a prefab system for quickly laying
      and
      > repairing track and kept the trains running on time and with
      precision. In
      > the West, Grenville Dodge adapted the English castle system for
      protecting
      > the lines and was able to fix broken track so quickly that the
      Confederates
      > were in complete awe.
      >
      > The best book I have found so far on the impact of railroads is
      Victory Rode
      > the Rails by George Edgar Turner which covers both the North and
      South
      > railroad situations. The Northern Railroads in the Civil War by
      Thomas
      > Webber is full of information, but much duller reading. Now I want
      to get
      > one that concentrates completely on the Southern railroads. The CSA
      also
      > displayed the Yankee ingenuity trait by the mere fact that they kept
      their
      > trains running to the end, an almost impossible task considering
      their lack
      > of resources in replenishing rolling stock and tracks. The
      railroads in the
      > CW are an amazing story worthy of a good movie.
      >
      > Connie
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.