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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Grant and Sherman's antisemitism was: Jews and the Con...

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  • Aurelie1999@aol.com
    Brooks definitely discusses General Orders No. 11 on pages 163-165. I won t quote it since buying and reading the book is the idea. LOL Connie
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 27, 2001
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      Brooks definitely discusses General Orders No. 11 on pages 163-165. I won't
      quote it since buying and reading the book is the idea. LOL Connie
    • FLYNSWEDE@AOL.COM
      In a message dated 12/26/01 6:19:04 PM Eastern Standard Time, Aurelie1999@aol.com writes:
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 27, 2001
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        In a message dated 12/26/01 6:19:04 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        Aurelie1999@... writes:

        << ou know I really, really like Sherman. He never bores me with his
        outrageous mouth and cantankerous personality. But let's face it, the man
        was a racist and that includes anti-Semite. No use trying to refine it.
        Nonetheless I think both Sherman and Grant tried to change their ways at
        least outwardly. Connie >>

        Connie,
        Like it or not, the majority of the country during that period of time
        discriminated upon one's racial background, one's religious background, or
        by the color of one's skin. That includes Catholics, Mormons, Blacks,
        Hispanics, Asian, Indian, Irish, German, French, etc. Was it morally
        correct - NO not according to today's standards nor the standards of that
        day, however it was a common practice. We cannot change history nor the
        characters that we study, but we can try to understand the reasons why they
        were like they were.

        Shucks, I'm too old to get on this topic - brings back too many memories.

        Wayne
      • Aurelie1999@aol.com
        In a message dated 12/27/01 8:00:36 PM Central Standard Time, FLYNSWEDE@AOL.COM writes:
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 27, 2001
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          In a message dated 12/27/01 8:00:36 PM Central Standard Time,
          FLYNSWEDE@... writes:

          << NO not according to today's standards nor the standards of that
          day, however it was a common practice. We cannot change history nor the
          characters that we study, but we can try to understand the reasons why they
          were like they were. >>
          True, very true. I grew up with my language littered with politically
          incorrect slang i.e. "I got jewed." Didn't even know the origin of the
          remarks nor the prejudice they encompassed. Another was "eeny meeny miny mo
          , catch a n....r by the toe." First time I realized that language could be
          ugly was while baby-sitting for a Jewish couple. Joy played the eeny meeny
          game with her daughter ending with "catch a tiger by the toe." I heard tiger
          loud and clear and the lights went on in my 16 year old head.

          Nonetheless as sticks and stones taught us, the more important essence of
          someone's bias is how they act on it. It's mighty important. Grant acted on
          his anti-Semitic bias when issuing General Orders #11. He learned and never
          did it again. He also overcame his bigotry enough to appoint Jews to office
          and interact with them socially. Lincoln did much the same thing. He knew
          he was a racist, even in 1860 the word was understood, but he did not allow
          his innate racism impede his ability to think, grow and explore new ideas and
          ways of responding to them. Connie
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