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Re: [civilwarwest] John Bell Hood and you thought Bragg was bad.

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  • FLYNSWEDE@AOL.COM
    In a message dated 11/30/01 10:38:03 AM Eastern Standard Time, lilsteve68@aol.com writes:
    Message 1 of 57 , Nov 30, 2001
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      In a message dated 11/30/01 10:38:03 AM Eastern Standard Time,
      lilsteve68@... writes:

      << Oh yes, certainly. But Hood was still one of the better Generals of the
      war, whether one wants to acknowledge that or not. He was perhaps Lee's best
      Brigadier, it was he who won the only victory for the Confederacy in the
      Seven Days. He was an excellent division commander, and was a pretty fine
      corps commander as well, but was not suited for overall command of an army.
      >>

      My case in point to my last post as to Hood not being a pretty fine corps
      commander, I submit the following pertaining to his actions at Cassville.

      I think the situation at Cassville was that Johnston had the AOT fairly
      concentrated (compared to Sherman, who was pretty spread out). JEJ wanted
      create a trap to draw Schofield into an attack on Polk's corps, while Hood
      waited in the wings to fall on Schofield's flank. Part of the deception
      involved sending Hardee west to confront the advances of McPherson and
      Thomas' main body, while leaving the Bishop's corps sitting just north of
      Cassville. Hood's corps was to remain off Polk's right flank, and wheel
      around to strike Schofield's detached army from the east.

      Sherman took the bait, and divided his force at Adairsville. But Hood was
      spooked by the almost inadvertent presence of Union cavalry (McCook's). Hood
      had been given very specific instructions, including a caution not to make
      the span of his wheeling march too wide. But when Hood encountered Yankee
      cavalry, he seems to have forgotten his orders, and instead turned to engage
      the mounted threat.

      After the war, Hood pretty much denied he had been ordered to ambush
      Schofield at Cassville. After JEJ's careful plan had unraveled, he withdrew
      his army to higher ground. Seeds of another controversy were planted that
      night, when a late meeting between JEJ and his three corps commanders
      resulted in Polk and Hood reporting that they could not hold their positions
      (something else Hood denied after the war). The result was the retreat to
      Allatoona Pass.

      Cassville was definitely an opportunity squandered.
      ____________________________________________________________
    • carlw4514
      One of the functions of cavalry is gathering intelligence on the position of the enemy. McCook must have accomplished this at least. Did this not put the
      Message 57 of 57 , Dec 6, 2001
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        One of the functions of cavalry is gathering intelligence on the
        position of the enemy. McCook must have accomplished this at least.
        Did this not put the attack in jeoparday? (I'm asking, I don't know)
        Carl
        PS: ngeorgia.com doesnt seem to have much on Cassville, and unless I
        am greatly mistaken you are a contributor there. Of course, it was the
        battle that never happened. Am I missing what they have on it?

        --- In civilwarwest@y..., FLYNSWEDE@A... wrote:

        > Carl,
        > That cavalry force that was approaching <there has been some
        discussion that
        > McCook's boys were not even aware of Hood being so close> was a
        small force
        > and if Hood dispatched a small portion of his Corp's to either deal
        with or
        > to lead them away from his planned theater of battle, there is
        excellent
        > probable cause that JEJ's plan of battle would have been successful.
        I
        > think that Hood got rattled too much when told of a cavalry force
        > approaching. Since when was cavalry going to get the best of
        infantry. <g>
        >
        > Ed Bearrs and others have the same thought as above. At least that
        was my
        > impression when we discussed this at a seminar in January 1999,
        along with
        > McMurray <who took up for Hood>, Wiley Sword, and other notables.
        >
        > Wayne
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