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Re: [civilwarwest] Inquiry about a writing project

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  • aero1485@aol.com
    I am also a writer, currently attempting to tackle a project on the Spanish-American war, slightly similar to Michael and Jeff Shaara s approach to the Civil
    Message 1 of 4 , May 13, 2000
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      I am also a writer, currently attempting to tackle a project on the
      Spanish-American war, slightly similar to Michael and Jeff Shaara's approach
      to the Civil War and the Mexican War. Afterwards (or during the time I write
      this) I wish to begin a book on the Civil War, which is definately still in
      early plot stages. I'd enjoy very much to help out in any way I can with
      your novel. I am a definately have more interest in the Civil War, and am
      positive I know enough to help out at the very least.
    • Stephen D Wakefield
      I certainly wish you good luck in your writing project. It is definitely a wonderful story . My one suggestion would be to try and simulate one group
      Message 2 of 4 , May 13, 2000
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        I certainly wish you good luck in your writing project. It is definitely a
        wonderful story . My one suggestion would be to try and simulate one "group"
        achievement- where you and your comrades, team mates or friends are forced
        to share real (but not dangerous)physical hardship in order to achieve a
        desired goal. Sometype of endeavor which allows different people to bring
        different talents and qualities to achieving the goal. An activity which
        tests everyone's physical endurance but which also requires everyone to rely
        upon everyone else doing their job.A one day project is simply not enough
        time. See about a week long trail ride perhaps. At some point you need to
        experience true fatigue , and real discomfort. Now do not endanger your self
        or anything but really something that is a real test of your particular
        physical limit.
        It has been mine limited experience that persons who have never gone though
        such an experience really fail to approach understanding the human
        experience of military activities. Just my opinion and very very good luck
        Regards-

        Wakefield
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: M. E. Heatherington <meheatherington@...>
        To: <civilwarwest@egroups.com>
        Cc: <jimgoshorn@...>
        Sent: Saturday, May 13, 2000 6:21 PM
        Subject: [civilwarwest] Inquiry about a writing project


        Dear Group:

        This is a long note, but I hope you will want to read it anyway. I am
        asking for advice.

        My project is a novel based on B. H. Grierson's April-May 1863 cavalry raid
        through Mississippi. Since it's fiction, I'm not planning a Michael
        Shaara-style approach, but I want to avoid Margaret Mitchell's shallow
        offensiveness. Think, as modern analogues, of Charles Frazier, Harry
        Turtledove, or John Jakes (without, I hope, the clunky writing).

        The protagonist, named Barton Willoughby, is a giddy young beau fresh out of
        Yale, aglow with Scott's heroic posturing, cheerful, charming, but callow.
        He will of course acquire experience, and become disillusioned about the
        supposed glamour of cavalry warfare; but along the way, he -- and, I hope,
        his readers -- will have a cracking good time with this most dashing and
        important, as Grant called it, of Union cavalry raids.

        Here's what I've done to prepare for the historical aspects of the book:

        -I've read D. Brown, the Leckies, Underwood, Bearss, and Starr. I've read
        most of the usual modern overviews (e.g., Catton, Foote, Nevins) and the
        contemporary military theorists (e.g., Hardee, Jomini, Cooke). I've read
        Grant's and Sherman's memoirs. I've read Harriet Beecher Stowe. I've even
        read as much of Walter Scott as I can stand.

        -I've recently driven Grierson's routes from La Grange to Baton Rouge,
        guided by Brown, the June '93 issue of "Blue & Gray" magazine, and a 1938
        WPA guide to Mississippi. I've walked all of the encounter sites on the
        raid.

        -I've tried to do/experience as much authentic, or authentically re-created,
        stuff as I can:
        o I've been to local CW re-enactments.
        o I know how to ride, how to shoot an Enfield and a Navy Colt, and how to
        make a few hacks with a cavalry saber -- none of these very well.
        o I've listened to tapes of CW-era music, including bugle calls.
        o Not voluntarily, I've been shot myself, with serious results.
        o I've worn an officer's hat and coat and an enlisted man's jacket, shirt,
        pants, cap, and gear: haversack, canteen, weapons, etc.
        o I've been on 10-mile hikes, in the summer, with a 50-pound pack on my
        back.
        o I've slept in a bedroll on the ground, with a saddle for my pillow, but
        just once, thanks.
        o I've eaten hardtack and drunk boiled coffee (also just once).

        If you're willing, I'd like to ask for your considered assistance.
        Specifically, what else do you think I should do to get this right and keep
        gross unintentional errors from sneaking up on Willoughby? And is there
        some additional reading I should tackle?
        Whatever your response, let me say here that I have already benefited from
        reading your discussions of Western-theater issues, and I am grateful for
        your advice.

        Sincerely yours,

        meheatherington@...

        Madelon E. Heatherington

        ________________________________________________________________________
        Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com


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      • Stephen D Wakefield
        I certainly wish you good luck in your writing project. It is definitely a wonderful story . My one suggestion would be to try and simulate one group
        Message 3 of 4 , May 13, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          I certainly wish you good luck in your writing project. It is definitely a
          wonderful story . My one suggestion would be to try and simulate one "group"
          achievement- where you and your comrades, team mates or friends are forced
          to share real (but not dangerous)physical hardship in order to achieve a
          desired goal. Sometype of endeavor which allows different people to bring
          different talents and qualities to achieving the goal. An activity which
          tests everyone's physical endurance but which also requires everyone to rely
          upon everyone else doing their job.A one day project is simply not enough
          time. See about a week long trail ride perhaps. At some point you need to
          experience true fatigue , and real discomfort. Now do not endanger your self
          or anything but really something that is a real test of your particular
          physical limit.
          It has been mine limited experience that persons who have never gone though
          such an experience really fail to approach understanding the human
          experience of military activities. Just my opinion and very very good luck
          Regards-

          Wakefield
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: M. E. Heatherington <meheatherington@...>
          To: <civilwarwest@egroups.com>
          Cc: <jimgoshorn@...>
          Sent: Saturday, May 13, 2000 6:21 PM
          Subject: [civilwarwest] Inquiry about a writing project


          Dear Group:

          This is a long note, but I hope you will want to read it anyway. I am
          asking for advice.

          My project is a novel based on B. H. Grierson's April-May 1863 cavalry raid
          through Mississippi. Since it's fiction, I'm not planning a Michael
          Shaara-style approach, but I want to avoid Margaret Mitchell's shallow
          offensiveness. Think, as modern analogues, of Charles Frazier, Harry
          Turtledove, or John Jakes (without, I hope, the clunky writing).

          The protagonist, named Barton Willoughby, is a giddy young beau fresh out of
          Yale, aglow with Scott's heroic posturing, cheerful, charming, but callow.
          He will of course acquire experience, and become disillusioned about the
          supposed glamour of cavalry warfare; but along the way, he -- and, I hope,
          his readers -- will have a cracking good time with this most dashing and
          important, as Grant called it, of Union cavalry raids.

          Here's what I've done to prepare for the historical aspects of the book:

          -I've read D. Brown, the Leckies, Underwood, Bearss, and Starr. I've read
          most of the usual modern overviews (e.g., Catton, Foote, Nevins) and the
          contemporary military theorists (e.g., Hardee, Jomini, Cooke). I've read
          Grant's and Sherman's memoirs. I've read Harriet Beecher Stowe. I've even
          read as much of Walter Scott as I can stand.

          -I've recently driven Grierson's routes from La Grange to Baton Rouge,
          guided by Brown, the June '93 issue of "Blue & Gray" magazine, and a 1938
          WPA guide to Mississippi. I've walked all of the encounter sites on the
          raid.

          -I've tried to do/experience as much authentic, or authentically re-created,
          stuff as I can:
          o I've been to local CW re-enactments.
          o I know how to ride, how to shoot an Enfield and a Navy Colt, and how to
          make a few hacks with a cavalry saber -- none of these very well.
          o I've listened to tapes of CW-era music, including bugle calls.
          o Not voluntarily, I've been shot myself, with serious results.
          o I've worn an officer's hat and coat and an enlisted man's jacket, shirt,
          pants, cap, and gear: haversack, canteen, weapons, etc.
          o I've been on 10-mile hikes, in the summer, with a 50-pound pack on my
          back.
          o I've slept in a bedroll on the ground, with a saddle for my pillow, but
          just once, thanks.
          o I've eaten hardtack and drunk boiled coffee (also just once).

          If you're willing, I'd like to ask for your considered assistance.
          Specifically, what else do you think I should do to get this right and keep
          gross unintentional errors from sneaking up on Willoughby? And is there
          some additional reading I should tackle?
          Whatever your response, let me say here that I have already benefited from
          reading your discussions of Western-theater issues, and I am grateful for
          your advice.

          Sincerely yours,

          meheatherington@...

          Madelon E. Heatherington

          ________________________________________________________________________
          Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com


          ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Get paid for the stuff you know!
          Get answers for the stuff you don't. And get $10 to spend on the site!
          http://click.egroups.com/1/2200/3/_/14182/_/958260124/
          ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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