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Re: Commander Responsibility

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  • clarkc@missouri.edu
    One reason regulars hold volunteers in such deep disdain is the drill regulars received in the overwhelming minituae of army life, two of which are how to
    Message 1 of 57 , Sep 24, 2001
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      One reason regulars hold volunteers in such deep disdain is the
      drill regulars received in the overwhelming minituae of army life, two
      of which are how to surender yourself and your unit without killing
      yourself and how to receive a surrender in kind.

      There are numerous examples of 'veteran' volunteer units partially
      surrendering, partially firing and partially running. (I immediately
      think of the CSA units in the Railroad Cut.)

      Probably the most dangerous second in a combat infantryman's life is
      the second between firing his last shot and throwing down his weapon
      with his hands aloft in surrender. The enemy you were just firing at
      might look upon this as a golden opportunity, particularly if your
      last shot took down his buddy...


      HankC

      --- In civilwarwest@y..., "Vic Vernon" <antietam@b...> wrote:
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: <Jfepperson@a...>
      > >
      > > Another distinction is that in Columbia the Confederates
      contributed
      > > to the problem by piling cotton in the streets and setting fires
      in
      > > various parts of town. At Fort Pillow, the Federals contributed
      to the
      > > situation by their own command stupidity, but I think that is a
      different
      > > kind of thing; command stupidity can be blamed for the Federal
      > > defeat at Fort Pillow, but not for the massacre that followed.
      > >
      > > JFE
      >
      >
      > There is an interesting parallel to Ft. Pillow. During the Campaign
      for
      > Guadalcanal a certain "surrendered" Japanese Ensign said some of the
      > Japanese were starving and ready to surrender. Also a "White Flag"
      was
      > spotted by Marine patrols. When a landing party was sent the Marines
      were
      > ambushed and killed. After that the Marines didn't always "accept" a
      > surrender from any Japanese soldiers.
      >
      > At Ft. Pillow the Federals also displayed a white flag then decided
      to start
      > shooting.
      >
      > So who do you condemn more? Those Confederates or the Marines on
      > Guadalcanal?
      >
      > BTW. The "White Flag" the marines saw was a Japanese national flag
      hanging
      > limp so the read ball was not visible. The white flag the Federals
      displayed
      > at Ft. Pillow was NOT a Japanese National Flag. :-)
      >
      > Vic
    • clarkc@missouri.edu
      One reason regulars hold volunteers in such deep disdain is the drill regulars received in the overwhelming minituae of army life, two of which are how to
      Message 57 of 57 , Sep 24, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        One reason regulars hold volunteers in such deep disdain is the
        drill regulars received in the overwhelming minituae of army life, two
        of which are how to surender yourself and your unit without killing
        yourself and how to receive a surrender in kind.

        There are numerous examples of 'veteran' volunteer units partially
        surrendering, partially firing and partially running. (I immediately
        think of the CSA units in the Railroad Cut.)

        Probably the most dangerous second in a combat infantryman's life is
        the second between firing his last shot and throwing down his weapon
        with his hands aloft in surrender. The enemy you were just firing at
        might look upon this as a golden opportunity, particularly if your
        last shot took down his buddy...


        HankC

        --- In civilwarwest@y..., "Vic Vernon" <antietam@b...> wrote:
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: <Jfepperson@a...>
        > >
        > > Another distinction is that in Columbia the Confederates
        contributed
        > > to the problem by piling cotton in the streets and setting fires
        in
        > > various parts of town. At Fort Pillow, the Federals contributed
        to the
        > > situation by their own command stupidity, but I think that is a
        different
        > > kind of thing; command stupidity can be blamed for the Federal
        > > defeat at Fort Pillow, but not for the massacre that followed.
        > >
        > > JFE
        >
        >
        > There is an interesting parallel to Ft. Pillow. During the Campaign
        for
        > Guadalcanal a certain "surrendered" Japanese Ensign said some of the
        > Japanese were starving and ready to surrender. Also a "White Flag"
        was
        > spotted by Marine patrols. When a landing party was sent the Marines
        were
        > ambushed and killed. After that the Marines didn't always "accept" a
        > surrender from any Japanese soldiers.
        >
        > At Ft. Pillow the Federals also displayed a white flag then decided
        to start
        > shooting.
        >
        > So who do you condemn more? Those Confederates or the Marines on
        > Guadalcanal?
        >
        > BTW. The "White Flag" the marines saw was a Japanese national flag
        hanging
        > limp so the read ball was not visible. The white flag the Federals
        displayed
        > at Ft. Pillow was NOT a Japanese National Flag. :-)
        >
        > Vic
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