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Re: War Weariness

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  • sdwakefield@prodigy.net
    Dear Mr. Brown- I just have to believe that you are on to something here. Having spent alot of time this year reading accounts of the Battle of Chickamauga I
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 20, 2001
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      Dear Mr. Brown-
      I just have to believe that you are on to something here. Having
      spent alot of time this year reading accounts of the Battle of
      Chickamauga I have been repeatedly struck with the accounts of lower
      level officers seemingly breaking down. These are officers that had
      previously shown great indiviual courage. Without benefit of my notes
      a couple seem to stick in my mind-
      Negley his actions of just walking away from the battlefield.
      Van Cleve apparently crying on a couple occasions.
      Starkweather I think wrote of sort of a blind stupor.
      And then I seem to recall Carlin who told of removing his saddle
      from his dead horse and just sitting down in the road and crying
      uncontrollably.
      Interesting stuff-
      Wakefield

      -- In civilwarwest@y..., "Bill Brown" <william.h.brown@n...> wrote:
      >
      > >May I suggest a new subject?
      >
      > >Bearing in mind the casualties involved on a regular basis, did
      senior officers ever display grief or horror at the results of >what
      they had ordered?
      >
      >
      > I wondered if these emotional displays may be a result of combat
      fatique (sic) by the officers. Dr. Simmons makes a strong case for
      that weariness in the Army of the Potomac during Gen. Grant's 5th
      Offensive at Petersburg/Richmond (Richmond Redeemed). I found that in
      the Army of the Cumberland, that some of the same emotional reactions
      were occuring in officers. These emotional reactions affected the
      decision-making process in the field. For example, I found that
      Brigadier General William P. Carlin may have suffered from that
      during 1864-1865. In addition, I wondered if other generals like
      Wagner at Franklin could have been affected by this weariness, which
      could have prevented him from recogizing the threat to his division
      at Franklin.
      >
      > Thoughts, anyone?
      >
      > Regards,
      > Bill
      >
      >
      > "There are no bad regiments, there are only bad officers."
      > Field Marshall Lord Slim
      > *********************************************
      > William H. (Bill) Brown, C.A.
      > Governors' Records Archivist (Archivist II)
      > North Carolina State Archives
      > 4615 Mail Service Center
      > Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-4615
      > 919-733-3540 (T)
      > 919-715-3627 (F)
      > william.h.brown@n...
      > govpapers.request@n...
      > ****************************************
      > "These opinions expressed in this communication may not
      > reflect those of my agency"
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