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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Top Ten Battles

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  • LWhite64@aol.com
    Chickamauga the 2nd bloodiest battle of the war, 34,000 casualties. Lee
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 2, 2001
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      Chickamauga the 2nd bloodiest battle of the war, 34,000 casualties.

      Lee
    • hartshje@aol.com
      Dave, Thanks for sharing this info. May I ask, on the Top 10 Battles & the Top 10 Campaigns; Top 10 what? Favorite to study? Most impact on the war?
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 2, 2001
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        Dave,

        Thanks for sharing this info. May I ask, on the Top 10 Battles &
        the Top 10 Campaigns; Top 10 what? Favorite to study? Most impact
        on the war? Obviously not biggest or bloodiest! I too am shocked
        not to see Chickamauga regardless of the "what".

        Joe

        --- In civilwarwest@y..., "Dave Smith" <dmsmith001@y...> wrote:
        > So we asked for the top ten battles (campaigns to follow):
        >
        > Here were the results:
        >
        > Ballots First Place Average Votes Per
        > Rank Name Cast for Points Votes Points Ballot
        > 1 Antietam 24 154.5 5.5 5.15 6.44
        > 2 Gettysburg 16 108.0 6.0 3.60 6.75
        > 3 Shiloh 16 90.0 2.0 3.00 5.63
        > 4 Ft. Donelson 10 65.0 3.0 2.17 6.50
        > 5 First Manassas 10 57.0 3.0 1.90 5.70
        > 6 Chattanooga 11 49.0 2.0 1.63 4.45
        > 7 Champion Hill 7 43.0 2.0 1.43 6.14
        > 8 Wilderness 10 24.0 0.0 0.80 2.40
        > 9 Chancellorsville 9 21.0 0.0 0.70 2.33
        > 10 Monitor / Virginia 3 21.0 2.0 0.70 7.00
        >
        > Full details at:
        >
        > http://members.aol.com/davebob1/awcusa_battles.htm
        >
        > Dave
        >
        > Dave Smith
        > Villa Hills, KY
      • Dave Smith
        ... East not in the West. The group that was asked the question was an open forum, so you can draw your conclusions appropriately. Dave
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 3, 2001
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          --- In civilwarwest@y..., FLYNSWEDE@A... wrote:
          > In a message dated 9/1/01 12:27:21 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          > dmsmith001@y... writes:
          >
          > << So we asked for the top ten battles (campaigns to follow):

          > Very very interesting - despite all our posts on the Chicamaugua
          > battle within this group, it was not one of the top ten. I also
          > notice once again, the majority of the battles listed were in the
          East not in the West.

          The group that was asked the question was an open forum, so you can
          draw your conclusions appropriately.

          Dave
        • Dave Smith
          ... What s interesting about the lists are that the battles in the East were ranked higher than those of the West, but the campaigns of the West were ranked,
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 3, 2001
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            --- In civilwarwest@y..., theme_music@y... wrote:
            >
            > I'm with Wayne, why the heck isn't Chickamauga in the top ten? No
            > Chickamauga, no Chattanooga and then we've got President Rosecrans!
            > Am I right?

            What's interesting about the lists are that the battles in the East
            were ranked higher than those of the West, but the campaigns of the
            West were ranked, in general, higher than those in the East.

            Dave
          • Dave Smith
            ... The key was the most significant - not biggest or bloodiest. We were looking for subjective opinions - not objective results. Those are easily
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 5, 2001
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              --- In civilwarwest@y..., hartshje@a... wrote:
              > Dave,
              >
              > Thanks for sharing this info. May I ask, on the Top 10 Battles &
              > the Top 10 Campaigns; Top 10 what? Favorite to study? Most impact
              > on the war? Obviously not biggest or bloodiest! I too am shocked
              > not to see Chickamauga regardless of the "what".

              The key was the most significant - not biggest or bloodiest. We were
              looking for subjective opinions - not objective results. Those are
              easily determined.

              One thing I'd note about the top ten Generals list. It seems, for
              the most part, that Grant adherents were willing to give Robert E.
              Lee is fair due, while for the most part, Lee adherents were less
              willing. Although a East / West crossover, it was an interesting
              phenomenon.

              Dave
            • FLYNSWEDE@AOL.COM
              I got the following from BGES and it is another battle. This is quite humorous as well. Please enjoy the Battle of Wauhatchie, October 28, 1863 written by
              Message 6 of 11 , Sep 5, 2001
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                I got the following from BGES and it is another battle. This is quite
                humorous as well.

                Please enjoy the Battle of Wauhatchie, October 28, 1863 written by John Mason
                of Huntsville, Alabama.

                Battle of Wauhatchie, October 28, 1863

                The Federal Army of the Cumberland had been holed up in Chattanooga,
                Tennessee, under a state of siege by Braxton Bragg's Army of Tennessee since
                the Battle of Chickamauga in September. Recognizing the importance of the
                military situation there, both governments used the best they had to help
                their respective armies -- the Confederates left James Longstreet's Corps
                from the Army of Northern Virginia in place while the Union sent Ulysses
                Grant. Grant acted immediately to lift the siege.

                Part of his plan involved the Union XII Corps under the command of Joe
                Hooker, recently arrived from the eastern theater. In late October, Hooker's
                troops began moving from Bridgeport, Alabama, up Lookout Valley, towards
                Chattanooga. This move would be contested by Longstreet's Virginians. On
                October 28, Longstreet noted that Union General John Geary's division was
                somewhat isolated from the rest of the Federal army, and planned a night
                attack to destroy it. Geary's soldiers were able to repel the attack, which
                was badly handled in the first place. But it was during the attack that one
                of the funny little vignettes of war occurred.

                There were some 200 mules in Geary's trains. The noise of battle spooked the
                animals, and they ran off en masse into the night. As luck would have it,
                they ran straight into the middle of Confederate General Wade Hampton's
                attacking legion. Assuming that the Federals had mounted a cavalry charge,
                the Rebels broke and fled. Cantankerous army mules had saved the day! One
                literate Yankee, remembering Tennyson's Charge of the Light Brigade, penned
                the following parody:

                Charge of the Mule Brigade

                Half a mile, half a mile,
                Half a mile onward,
                Right through the Georgia troops
                Broke the two hundred.

                "Forward the Mule Brigade!"
                Was there a mule dismayed?
                Not when the long ears felt
                All their ropes sundered.
                Theirs not to make reply,
                Theirs not to reason why,
                Theirs but to make Reds fly.
                On! To the Georgia troops
                Broke the two hundred.

                Mules to the right of them,
                Mules to the left of them,
                Mules behind them,
                Pawed, neighed and thundered.
                Breaking their own confines,
                Breaking through Longstreet's lines,
                Into the Georgia troops
                Stormed the two hundred.

                Wild at their eyes sis glare,
                Whisked all their tales in air
                Scattering the chivalry there,
                While all the world wondered .
                Not a mule back bestraddle,
                Yet how they skedaddled -
                Fled every Georgian,
                Unsabered, unsaddled, scattered and sundered!
                How they were routed there
                By the two hundred.

                Mules to the right of them,
                Mules to the left of them,
                Mules behind them,
                Pawed, neighed and thundered;
                Followed by hoof and head
                Many a hero fled,
                Fain in the last ditch dead,
                Back from an ass's jaw
                All that was left of them, -
                Left by the two hundred.

                When can their glory fade?
                Oh, the wild charge they made!
                All the world wondered.
                Honor the charge they made!
                Honor the mule brigade,
                Long-eared two hundred.

                -Poem copied from John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee.
              • carlw4514@yahoo.com
                This must have inspired Ambrose Bierce s short story JUPITER DOKE, BRIGADIER-GENERAL. In it Bierce tells the story of a Federal victory by a series of letters
                Message 7 of 11 , Sep 5, 2001
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                  This must have inspired Ambrose Bierce's short story JUPITER DOKE,
                  BRIGADIER-GENERAL. In it Bierce tells the story of a Federal victory
                  by a series of letters and dispatches. One Confederate thought his
                  troops got wiped out by a tornado, another by 50,000 cavalry, a Gen.
                  Baumschank resigns - " I vights no more in a dam gontry vere I gets
                  vipped und knows nod how it vos done", etc., and in the end we find
                  out the Yank general had jumped out the back window of his
                  headquarters in the middle of the night, to run for his life, and
                  spooks the mules which trample over the Rebs winning him the day.

                  --- In civilwarwest@y..., FLYNSWEDE@A... wrote:
                  > I got the following from BGES and it is another battle. This is
                  quite
                  > humorous as well.
                  >
                  > Please enjoy the Battle of Wauhatchie, October 28, 1863 written by
                  John Mason
                  > of Huntsville, Alabama.
                  >
                  > Battle of Wauhatchie, October 28, 1863
                  >
                  > The Federal Army of the Cumberland had been holed up in Chattanooga,
                  > Tennessee, under a state of siege by Braxton Bragg's Army of
                  Tennessee since
                  > the Battle of Chickamauga in September. Recognizing the importance
                  of the
                  > military situation there, both governments used the best they had to
                  help
                  > their respective armies -- the Confederates left James Longstreet's
                  Corps
                  > from the Army of Northern Virginia in place while the Union sent
                  Ulysses
                  > Grant. Grant acted immediately to lift the siege.
                  >
                  > Part of his plan involved the Union XII Corps under the command of
                  Joe
                  > Hooker, recently arrived from the eastern theater. In late October,
                  Hooker's
                  > troops began moving from Bridgeport, Alabama, up Lookout Valley,
                  towards
                  > Chattanooga. This move would be contested by Longstreet's
                  Virginians. On
                  > October 28, Longstreet noted that Union General John Geary's
                  division was
                  > somewhat isolated from the rest of the Federal army, and planned a
                  night
                  > attack to destroy it. Geary's soldiers were able to repel the
                  attack, which
                  > was badly handled in the first place. But it was during the attack
                  that one
                  > of the funny little vignettes of war occurred.
                  >
                  > There were some 200 mules in Geary's trains. The noise of battle
                  spooked the
                  > animals, and they ran off en masse into the night. As luck would
                  have it,
                  > they ran straight into the middle of Confederate General Wade
                  Hampton's
                  > attacking legion. Assuming that the Federals had mounted a cavalry
                  charge,
                  > the Rebels broke and fled. Cantankerous army mules had saved the
                  day! One
                  > literate Yankee, remembering Tennyson's Charge of the Light Brigade,
                  penned
                  > the following parody:
                  >
                  > Charge of the Mule Brigade
                  >
                  > Half a mile, half a mile,
                  > Half a mile onward,
                  > Right through the Georgia troops
                  > Broke the two hundred.
                  >
                  > "Forward the Mule Brigade!"
                  > Was there a mule dismayed?
                  > Not when the long ears felt
                  > All their ropes sundered.
                  > Theirs not to make reply,
                  > Theirs not to reason why,
                  > Theirs but to make Reds fly.
                  > On! To the Georgia troops
                  > Broke the two hundred.
                  >
                  > Mules to the right of them,
                  > Mules to the left of them,
                  > Mules behind them,
                  > Pawed, neighed and thundered.
                  > Breaking their own confines,
                  > Breaking through Longstreet's lines,
                  > Into the Georgia troops
                  > Stormed the two hundred.
                  >
                  > Wild at their eyes sis glare,
                  > Whisked all their tales in air
                  > Scattering the chivalry there,
                  > While all the world wondered .
                  > Not a mule back bestraddle,
                  > Yet how they skedaddled -
                  > Fled every Georgian,
                  > Unsabered, unsaddled, scattered and sundered!
                  > How they were routed there
                  > By the two hundred.
                  >
                  > Mules to the right of them,
                  > Mules to the left of them,
                  > Mules behind them,
                  > Pawed, neighed and thundered;
                  > Followed by hoof and head
                  > Many a hero fled,
                  > Fain in the last ditch dead,
                  > Back from an ass's jaw
                  > All that was left of them, -
                  > Left by the two hundred.
                  >
                  > When can their glory fade?
                  > Oh, the wild charge they made!
                  > All the world wondered.
                  > Honor the charge they made!
                  > Honor the mule brigade,
                  > Long-eared two hundred.
                  >
                  > -Poem copied from John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee.
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