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[civilwarwest] Detailes of joining either army?

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  • GARET848@aol.com
    Recently the question came up concerning how one joined one or the other army, either the North or the South? Our curiosity stems from a genealogy
    Message 1 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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      Recently the question came up concerning how one joined one or the other
      army, either the North or the South? Our curiosity stems from a genealogy
      perspective. For example we've always heard "Brother against Brother" "One
      fought for the South and the other for the North." The question comes from
      an Arkansas family that has one son in the Confederacy and the other in the
      Union army. We know that the one in the confederacy joined in Arkansas, a
      Confederate State. Where would the other have gone to join the union army?
      Another state? Were there recruiters for both sides in the same states?

      In another instance a persons living in Limestone County Alabama States he
      was from Giles County Tennessee to join? Another person known to have lived
      in Lincoln County Tennessee states he joined the Confederacy in Giles County
      (next to LIncoln Co.) Tennessee. Why did they go to Giles County Tennessee
      to join? A recruiting center?

      Was joining up a formal process much as today? Or could you simply pick up
      your rifle and fall in with the passing unit? Gone With The Wind movie style?

      Also, my impression is it was more of an issue for Southern families to be
      split than it was for families of the North? But this may not be true?
      Perhaps I have that impression as most of my activity has been researching
      southern families? Would Northerners have to travel to a Confederate State to
      Join the Confederacy?

      Many of us would sincerely appreciate some insight on these questions. They
      keep coming up and we do not have good explanations. I have primarily been a
      lurker and benefactor or this groups knowledge and expertise. And I certainly
      admire your detailed knowledge of questions that surface on this list. Any
      help you could be on these questions will be greatly appreciated.

      Sincerely,

      Coy Garrett
      garet848@...
    • GARET848@aol.com
      Recently the question came up concerning how one joined one or the other army, either the North or the South? Our curiosity stems from a genealogy
      Message 2 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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        Recently the question came up concerning how one joined one or the other
        army, either the North or the South? Our curiosity stems from a genealogy
        perspective. For example we've always heard "Brother against Brother" "One
        fought for the South and the other for the North." The question comes from
        an Arkansas family that has one son in the Confederacy and the other in the
        Union army. We know that the one in the confederacy joined in Arkansas, a
        Confederate State. Where would the other have gone to join the union army?
        Another state? Were there recruiters for both sides in the same states?

        In another instance a persons living in Limestone County Alabama States he
        was from Giles County Tennessee to join? Another person known to have lived
        in Lincoln County Tennessee states he joined the Confederacy in Giles County
        (next to LIncoln Co.) Tennessee. Why did they go to Giles County Tennessee
        to join? A recruiting center?

        Was joining up a formal process much as today? Or could you simply pick up
        your rifle and fall in with the passing unit? Gone With The Wind movie style?

        Also, my impression is it was more of an issue for Southern families to be
        split than it was for families of the North? But this may not be true?
        Perhaps I have that impression as most of my activity has been researching
        southern families? Would Northerners have to travel to a Confederate State to
        Join the Confederacy?

        Many of us would sincerely appreciate some insight on these questions. They
        keep coming up and we do not have good explanations. I have primarily been a
        lurker and benefactor or this groups knowledge and expertise. And I certainly
        admire your detailed knowledge of questions that surface on this list. Any
        help you could be on these questions will be greatly appreciated.

        Sincerely,

        Coy Garrett
        garet848@...
      • WOLF17X7@aol.com
        Message 3 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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        • WOLF17X7@aol.com
          Message 4 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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          • WOLF17X7@aol.com
            Coy, Recruiters would locate in a particular area, and then somehow get the word out that they were set up. Sometimes individuals that wanted to join got large
            Message 5 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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              Coy,
              Recruiters would locate in a particular area, and then somehow get the word
              out that they were set up. Sometimes individuals that wanted to join got
              large groups together and traveled to a central location.Sometimes
              individuals with military experience would get permission to form their own
              group then they would be assigned to an officer higher in rank. I live in
              Ark. and it was fairly common for recruitment for both sides to occur . Coy
              good luck with your research!
              Steve
            • WOLF17X7@aol.com
              Coy, Recruiters would locate in a particular area, and then somehow get the word out that they were set up. Sometimes individuals that wanted to join got large
              Message 6 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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                Coy,
                Recruiters would locate in a particular area, and then somehow get the word
                out that they were set up. Sometimes individuals that wanted to join got
                large groups together and traveled to a central location.Sometimes
                individuals with military experience would get permission to form their own
                group then they would be assigned to an officer higher in rank. I live in
                Ark. and it was fairly common for recruitment for both sides to occur . Coy
                good luck with your research!
                Steve
              • Kristine Statham
                Try looking at www.infinet.com, under letters of Richard Burt 76th Ohio, there is an interesting Newspaper Recruiting Ad. ... Coy, Recruiters would locate in a
                Message 7 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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                  Try looking at www.infinet.com, under letters of Richard Burt 76th Ohio, there is an interesting Newspaper Recruiting Ad.

                  >>> WOLF17X7@... 03/21/00 12:46PM >>>
                  Coy,
                  Recruiters would locate in a particular area, and then somehow get the word
                  out that they were set up. Sometimes individuals that wanted to join got
                  large groups together and traveled to a central location.Sometimes
                  individuals with military experience would get permission to form their own
                  group then they would be assigned to an officer higher in rank. I live in
                  Ark. and it was fairly common for recruitment for both sides to occur . Coy
                  good luck with your research!
                  Steve

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                • Kristine Statham
                  Try looking at www.infinet.com, under letters of Richard Burt 76th Ohio, there is an interesting Newspaper Recruiting Ad. ... Coy, Recruiters would locate in a
                  Message 8 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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                    Try looking at www.infinet.com, under letters of Richard Burt 76th Ohio, there is an interesting Newspaper Recruiting Ad.

                    >>> WOLF17X7@... 03/21/00 12:46PM >>>
                    Coy,
                    Recruiters would locate in a particular area, and then somehow get the word
                    out that they were set up. Sometimes individuals that wanted to join got
                    large groups together and traveled to a central location.Sometimes
                    individuals with military experience would get permission to form their own
                    group then they would be assigned to an officer higher in rank. I live in
                    Ark. and it was fairly common for recruitment for both sides to occur . Coy
                    good luck with your research!
                    Steve

                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Go to Findlaw.com and get your FREE FLEECE from FindLaw.
                    FindLaw is the Internet's best destination for free legal
                    information! Take advantage of this offer and go to
                    Findlaw.com now!
                    http://click.egroups.com/1/1827/2/_/14182/_/953664435/

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                  • Terry Arliskas
                    Generally, it worked like this (at least for Union Armies): The President issued a call for volunteers (1st call April, 1862 in response to the firing upon of
                    Message 9 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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                      Generally, it worked like this (at least for Union Armies):

                      The President issued a call for volunteers (1st call April, 1862 in response
                      to the firing upon of Ft. Sumter, 2nd call August 1862)), and each state was
                      given a quota of troops that it needed to raise. Towns and cities would
                      hold "war meetings" featuring patriotic speaches, martial music, cheers for
                      the Union, etc. where young men would enlist into companies composed of
                      other young men from same geographic area (same county - closely located
                      towns, etc). The State Adjutant General was responsible then for organizing
                      (and also raising volunteers) these companies into regiments, and early on
                      the states were responsible for arming and equipping the volunteers (to be
                      reimbursed later by the Feds). Companies would be organized by the State
                      Adj Genl into regiments, and the regiments mustered into U.S. Service at
                      training camps. The War Dept. then organized the regiments into brigades,
                      divisions, corps, etc. Once a regiment left its home State, it came under
                      the command and control of the War Dept. This system of course, was
                      augmented later in the War by the Draft, and in some cases regiments were
                      composed entirely of drafted men, and in some cases, existing regiments in
                      the field were supplemented by drafted men to replace those who had died or
                      been discharged.

                      One did not simply "pick up their musket" and march off to War - a
                      beaurocratic system was firmly in place to effectively raise and manage army
                      regiments, and then, as now, the armies left a huge paper trail in its wake.
                      Everything was carefully documented in duplicate and triplicate - some
                      things never change!

                      I can't really comment on how Confederate regiments were raised, but do know
                      that those Notherners that wished to fight for the South did indeed need to
                      go South to enlist. Company G of the 15th Tennessee Vol. Inf. was one of
                      those units - made up of men from Southern Illinois that made their way to
                      the Kentucky/Tennessee border to enlist in Conf. States service.

                      Hope this helps.

                      Terry Arliskas (29 WVI)



                      >From: GARET848@...
                      >Reply-To: civilwarwest@egroups.com
                      >To: civilwarwest@egroups.com
                      >CC: Rustyspud@...
                      >Subject: [civilwarwest] Detailes of joining either army?
                      >Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2000 06:46:02 EST
                      >
                      >
                      >Recently the question came up concerning how one joined one or the other
                      >army, either the North or the South? Our curiosity stems from a genealogy
                      >perspective. For example we've always heard "Brother against Brother" "One
                      >fought for the South and the other for the North." The question comes from
                      >an Arkansas family that has one son in the Confederacy and the other in the
                      >Union army. We know that the one in the confederacy joined in Arkansas, a
                      >Confederate State. Where would the other have gone to join the union army?
                      >Another state? Were there recruiters for both sides in the same states?
                      >
                      >In another instance a persons living in Limestone County Alabama States he
                      >was from Giles County Tennessee to join? Another person known to have lived
                      >in Lincoln County Tennessee states he joined the Confederacy in Giles
                      >County
                      >(next to LIncoln Co.) Tennessee. Why did they go to Giles County Tennessee
                      >to join? A recruiting center?
                      >
                      >Was joining up a formal process much as today? Or could you simply pick up
                      >your rifle and fall in with the passing unit? Gone With The Wind movie
                      >style?
                      >
                      >Also, my impression is it was more of an issue for Southern families to be
                      >split than it was for families of the North? But this may not be true?
                      >Perhaps I have that impression as most of my activity has been researching
                      >southern families? Would Northerners have to travel to a Confederate State
                      >to
                      >Join the Confederacy?
                      >
                      >Many of us would sincerely appreciate some insight on these questions.
                      >They
                      >keep coming up and we do not have good explanations. I have primarily been
                      >a
                      >lurker and benefactor or this groups knowledge and expertise. And I
                      >certainly
                      >admire your detailed knowledge of questions that surface on this list. Any
                      >help you could be on these questions will be greatly appreciated.
                      >
                      >Sincerely,
                      >
                      >Coy Garrett
                      >garet848@...
                      >
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                      ______________________________________________________
                    • Terry Arliskas
                      Generally, it worked like this (at least for Union Armies): The President issued a call for volunteers (1st call April, 1862 in response to the firing upon of
                      Message 10 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Generally, it worked like this (at least for Union Armies):

                        The President issued a call for volunteers (1st call April, 1862 in response
                        to the firing upon of Ft. Sumter, 2nd call August 1862)), and each state was
                        given a quota of troops that it needed to raise. Towns and cities would
                        hold "war meetings" featuring patriotic speaches, martial music, cheers for
                        the Union, etc. where young men would enlist into companies composed of
                        other young men from same geographic area (same county - closely located
                        towns, etc). The State Adjutant General was responsible then for organizing
                        (and also raising volunteers) these companies into regiments, and early on
                        the states were responsible for arming and equipping the volunteers (to be
                        reimbursed later by the Feds). Companies would be organized by the State
                        Adj Genl into regiments, and the regiments mustered into U.S. Service at
                        training camps. The War Dept. then organized the regiments into brigades,
                        divisions, corps, etc. Once a regiment left its home State, it came under
                        the command and control of the War Dept. This system of course, was
                        augmented later in the War by the Draft, and in some cases regiments were
                        composed entirely of drafted men, and in some cases, existing regiments in
                        the field were supplemented by drafted men to replace those who had died or
                        been discharged.

                        One did not simply "pick up their musket" and march off to War - a
                        beaurocratic system was firmly in place to effectively raise and manage army
                        regiments, and then, as now, the armies left a huge paper trail in its wake.
                        Everything was carefully documented in duplicate and triplicate - some
                        things never change!

                        I can't really comment on how Confederate regiments were raised, but do know
                        that those Notherners that wished to fight for the South did indeed need to
                        go South to enlist. Company G of the 15th Tennessee Vol. Inf. was one of
                        those units - made up of men from Southern Illinois that made their way to
                        the Kentucky/Tennessee border to enlist in Conf. States service.

                        Hope this helps.

                        Terry Arliskas (29 WVI)



                        >From: GARET848@...
                        >Reply-To: civilwarwest@egroups.com
                        >To: civilwarwest@egroups.com
                        >CC: Rustyspud@...
                        >Subject: [civilwarwest] Detailes of joining either army?
                        >Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2000 06:46:02 EST
                        >
                        >
                        >Recently the question came up concerning how one joined one or the other
                        >army, either the North or the South? Our curiosity stems from a genealogy
                        >perspective. For example we've always heard "Brother against Brother" "One
                        >fought for the South and the other for the North." The question comes from
                        >an Arkansas family that has one son in the Confederacy and the other in the
                        >Union army. We know that the one in the confederacy joined in Arkansas, a
                        >Confederate State. Where would the other have gone to join the union army?
                        >Another state? Were there recruiters for both sides in the same states?
                        >
                        >In another instance a persons living in Limestone County Alabama States he
                        >was from Giles County Tennessee to join? Another person known to have lived
                        >in Lincoln County Tennessee states he joined the Confederacy in Giles
                        >County
                        >(next to LIncoln Co.) Tennessee. Why did they go to Giles County Tennessee
                        >to join? A recruiting center?
                        >
                        >Was joining up a formal process much as today? Or could you simply pick up
                        >your rifle and fall in with the passing unit? Gone With The Wind movie
                        >style?
                        >
                        >Also, my impression is it was more of an issue for Southern families to be
                        >split than it was for families of the North? But this may not be true?
                        >Perhaps I have that impression as most of my activity has been researching
                        >southern families? Would Northerners have to travel to a Confederate State
                        >to
                        >Join the Confederacy?
                        >
                        >Many of us would sincerely appreciate some insight on these questions.
                        >They
                        >keep coming up and we do not have good explanations. I have primarily been
                        >a
                        >lurker and benefactor or this groups knowledge and expertise. And I
                        >certainly
                        >admire your detailed knowledge of questions that surface on this list. Any
                        >help you could be on these questions will be greatly appreciated.
                        >
                        >Sincerely,
                        >
                        >Coy Garrett
                        >garet848@...
                        >
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                        >Get automatic protection and access to your important computer files.
                        >Install today:
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                        >

                        ______________________________________________________
                      • Aero1485@aol.com
                        Mr. Garrett. I have a mere idea as to where and how men would join the armies. I have not heard much of this, either, and am curious as well. I believe
                        Message 11 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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                          Mr. Garrett. I have a mere idea as to where and how men would join the
                          armies. I have not heard much of this, either, and am curious as well. I
                          believe stations where men could sign up for the US could sign up in US
                          states. However, the men joining at the very start of the war could probably
                          join from states that would soon secede. (This is just a theory) I don't
                          believe the US would have posts in the Confederacy furthur on during the war,
                          because it would be too dangerous. (However, I could be wrong, risks are part
                          of the game, after all). Thank you for reading my input. I figured any
                          little bit of info could help.
                        • Aero1485@aol.com
                          Mr. Garrett. I have a mere idea as to where and how men would join the armies. I have not heard much of this, either, and am curious as well. I believe
                          Message 12 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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                            Mr. Garrett. I have a mere idea as to where and how men would join the
                            armies. I have not heard much of this, either, and am curious as well. I
                            believe stations where men could sign up for the US could sign up in US
                            states. However, the men joining at the very start of the war could probably
                            join from states that would soon secede. (This is just a theory) I don't
                            believe the US would have posts in the Confederacy furthur on during the war,
                            because it would be too dangerous. (However, I could be wrong, risks are part
                            of the game, after all). Thank you for reading my input. I figured any
                            little bit of info could help.
                          • Aero1485@aol.com
                            Hm....it would seem I was a little off on my theory, but everyone s idea makes perfectsense.
                            Message 13 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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                              Hm....it would seem I was a little off on my theory, but everyone's idea
                              makes perfectsense.
                            • Aero1485@aol.com
                              Hm....it would seem I was a little off on my theory, but everyone s idea makes perfectsense.
                              Message 14 of 20 , Mar 21, 2000
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                                Hm....it would seem I was a little off on my theory, but everyone's idea
                                makes perfectsense.
                              • Waldemar Winkler
                                I cannot speak with too much authority on the subject of Confederate enlistments except in terms what I have been able to infer from tracing the movements of
                                Message 15 of 20 , Mar 22, 2000
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                                  I cannot speak with too much authority on the subject of Confederate
                                  enlistments except in terms what I have been able to infer from tracing
                                  the movements of my great grandfather's regiment, the 23d Mississippi
                                  Infantry. Since the 23d's records did not survive my research has
                                  focused more on the "where"(were they) and "when"(were they where) than
                                  the "why"(were they there). After some reflection the "whys" start to
                                  offer their own answers.

                                  My great grandfather, David W. Wade, enlisted in response to a call for
                                  volunteers issued by the Governor of the State of Mississippi. This
                                  call was apparently issued in response to a call issued by General
                                  Albert Sydney Johnston in the spring of 1861. President Jefferson
                                  Davis had given Johnston the responsibility of defending the South
                                  along a line extending from the Cumberland Gap in the east to Arkansas
                                  in the west. As a Confederate Army Commander, he apparently had the
                                  authority to call upon the states for support. General Johnston's call
                                  for troops was specifically to those states which were within or
                                  bordered the area of his defensive jurisdiction.

                                  I have been able to surmise that specific individuals were responsible
                                  for raising troops in specific areas of a state. In D.W. Wade's case,
                                  a man by the name of Davidson raised an entire regiment within the
                                  vicinity of Tippah County in northeast Mississippi. He emerged from
                                  this process with the rank of Colonel in the state militia. It seems
                                  most Confederate regiments were initially designated as "state troops".
                                  The process appeared to take about four to six weeks, a time frame
                                  which I guess allowed the individual to take time to wrap up his
                                  personal affairs before reporting to duty. The 23d Miss. Inf. (which
                                  started out as the 2nd Miss. State Troops) was officially mustered in
                                  May of 1861 but didn't officially exist in real numbers or real people
                                  until July of 1862. My great grandfather's company (Co. K) came
                                  entirely from the community of Malone, and numbered 90 men. The entire
                                  regiment numbered about 900 men, 10% shy of the text book number for a
                                  regiment at that time.

                                  Somewhere between July and November of 1862 these troops made their way
                                  to Bowling Green, Ky, where they were armed, provisioned, and
                                  reorganized into the 23d Mississippi Infantry Regiment, under the
                                  direct command of the Confederate States Military. This was a shift in
                                  command authority similar to Federal policy, where state trops
                                  immediately became under the juristiction of the War Department one
                                  they left the borders of their whome state. In this case, Col.
                                  Davidson kept both his rank and his command. Dysentery struck soon.
                                  He survived until April of the folowing year.

                                  Key to Confederate enlistment was the favoritism in keeping regiments
                                  organized according to their home communities. If a man opted for
                                  enlistement he had some choice regarding his regiment. Draftees had no
                                  choices. Decimated regiments were incorporated into others as the war
                                  went on. Before General Joseph Johnston surrendered he incorporated at
                                  least five regiments into one, just to get the regimental numbers up to
                                  par.

                                  In reference to another question relating to the actual numbers of
                                  regiments at the battle of Franklin, I can only offer the following
                                  generalizations:
                                  The ideal company should have ten companies of 100 men each. In a
                                  battle line the regiment typically formed by company in two lines.
                                  Allowing 2 feet for each soldier, the regiment would present a 500 man
                                  front line 1000 feet wide, immediately followd by the second line some
                                  30 to 50 yards distant. In reality few regiments on either side ever
                                  presented ideal numbers. Disease and infection accounted for more
                                  fatalities than combat. The average regiment appeared to waver between
                                  300 to 500.

                                  This has been a long winded answer. I hope it has not been boring. To
                                  all members of civilwar west, I beg your response, questions, and
                                  corrections to anything I have offered.

                                  Respectfully,

                                  Waldemar Winkler
                                • Waldemar Winkler
                                  I cannot speak with too much authority on the subject of Confederate enlistments except in terms what I have been able to infer from tracing the movements of
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Mar 22, 2000
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                                    I cannot speak with too much authority on the subject of Confederate
                                    enlistments except in terms what I have been able to infer from tracing
                                    the movements of my great grandfather's regiment, the 23d Mississippi
                                    Infantry. Since the 23d's records did not survive my research has
                                    focused more on the "where"(were they) and "when"(were they where) than
                                    the "why"(were they there). After some reflection the "whys" start to
                                    offer their own answers.

                                    My great grandfather, David W. Wade, enlisted in response to a call for
                                    volunteers issued by the Governor of the State of Mississippi. This
                                    call was apparently issued in response to a call issued by General
                                    Albert Sydney Johnston in the spring of 1861. President Jefferson
                                    Davis had given Johnston the responsibility of defending the South
                                    along a line extending from the Cumberland Gap in the east to Arkansas
                                    in the west. As a Confederate Army Commander, he apparently had the
                                    authority to call upon the states for support. General Johnston's call
                                    for troops was specifically to those states which were within or
                                    bordered the area of his defensive jurisdiction.

                                    I have been able to surmise that specific individuals were responsible
                                    for raising troops in specific areas of a state. In D.W. Wade's case,
                                    a man by the name of Davidson raised an entire regiment within the
                                    vicinity of Tippah County in northeast Mississippi. He emerged from
                                    this process with the rank of Colonel in the state militia. It seems
                                    most Confederate regiments were initially designated as "state troops".
                                    The process appeared to take about four to six weeks, a time frame
                                    which I guess allowed the individual to take time to wrap up his
                                    personal affairs before reporting to duty. The 23d Miss. Inf. (which
                                    started out as the 2nd Miss. State Troops) was officially mustered in
                                    May of 1861 but didn't officially exist in real numbers or real people
                                    until July of 1862. My great grandfather's company (Co. K) came
                                    entirely from the community of Malone, and numbered 90 men. The entire
                                    regiment numbered about 900 men, 10% shy of the text book number for a
                                    regiment at that time.

                                    Somewhere between July and November of 1862 these troops made their way
                                    to Bowling Green, Ky, where they were armed, provisioned, and
                                    reorganized into the 23d Mississippi Infantry Regiment, under the
                                    direct command of the Confederate States Military. This was a shift in
                                    command authority similar to Federal policy, where state trops
                                    immediately became under the juristiction of the War Department one
                                    they left the borders of their whome state. In this case, Col.
                                    Davidson kept both his rank and his command. Dysentery struck soon.
                                    He survived until April of the folowing year.

                                    Key to Confederate enlistment was the favoritism in keeping regiments
                                    organized according to their home communities. If a man opted for
                                    enlistement he had some choice regarding his regiment. Draftees had no
                                    choices. Decimated regiments were incorporated into others as the war
                                    went on. Before General Joseph Johnston surrendered he incorporated at
                                    least five regiments into one, just to get the regimental numbers up to
                                    par.

                                    In reference to another question relating to the actual numbers of
                                    regiments at the battle of Franklin, I can only offer the following
                                    generalizations:
                                    The ideal company should have ten companies of 100 men each. In a
                                    battle line the regiment typically formed by company in two lines.
                                    Allowing 2 feet for each soldier, the regiment would present a 500 man
                                    front line 1000 feet wide, immediately followd by the second line some
                                    30 to 50 yards distant. In reality few regiments on either side ever
                                    presented ideal numbers. Disease and infection accounted for more
                                    fatalities than combat. The average regiment appeared to waver between
                                    300 to 500.

                                    This has been a long winded answer. I hope it has not been boring. To
                                    all members of civilwar west, I beg your response, questions, and
                                    corrections to anything I have offered.

                                    Respectfully,

                                    Waldemar Winkler
                                  • TsalagiBra@aol.com
                                    Waldemar, Your post on joining Confederate units was good and appears to be in line with what I have found through following the histories of the 6th Alabama
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Mar 23, 2000
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                                      Waldemar,
                                      Your post on joining Confederate units was good and appears to be in line
                                      with what I have found through following the histories of the 6th Alabama
                                      Cavalry and the 15th Confederate Cavalry Regiment. I am a member of the 15th
                                      and have only one small item to add to your excellent piece.
                                      Regarding who the units belonged to (i.e. State Militias, The Army, etc),
                                      I have found that at the Battle of Blakley, here in Mobile, the units listed
                                      are under various headings by state (Mississippi, S. Carolina, Tennessee,
                                      Maryland, etc) with one listing that is headed: Confederate Regulars. At
                                      this particular battle the units shown as Regulars are:
                                      ENGINEERS - Hutchinson's Co; Vernon's Co. 2nd Engingeers
                                      CAVALRY - 15th Confederate Cav; 16th Confederate Cav
                                      MARINE CORPS - CSMC, Squad "D"
                                      CONFEDERATE NAVY - CSS Nashville; CSS Morgan; CSS Huntsville; CSS
                                      Tuscaloosa; Crew Gun Boat Gaines

                                      Although the majority of regiments were formed as State Units, I believe
                                      there were units also assigned to the Confederate Government as Regulars in
                                      the form of a standing army, if you will, while State Units were more in line
                                      with the National Guard of today. Of course, in this I may be wrong, but
                                      that is my impression.

                                      Steve McGraw
                                    • TsalagiBra@aol.com
                                      Waldemar, Your post on joining Confederate units was good and appears to be in line with what I have found through following the histories of the 6th Alabama
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Mar 23, 2000
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                                        Waldemar,
                                        Your post on joining Confederate units was good and appears to be in line
                                        with what I have found through following the histories of the 6th Alabama
                                        Cavalry and the 15th Confederate Cavalry Regiment. I am a member of the 15th
                                        and have only one small item to add to your excellent piece.
                                        Regarding who the units belonged to (i.e. State Militias, The Army, etc),
                                        I have found that at the Battle of Blakley, here in Mobile, the units listed
                                        are under various headings by state (Mississippi, S. Carolina, Tennessee,
                                        Maryland, etc) with one listing that is headed: Confederate Regulars. At
                                        this particular battle the units shown as Regulars are:
                                        ENGINEERS - Hutchinson's Co; Vernon's Co. 2nd Engingeers
                                        CAVALRY - 15th Confederate Cav; 16th Confederate Cav
                                        MARINE CORPS - CSMC, Squad "D"
                                        CONFEDERATE NAVY - CSS Nashville; CSS Morgan; CSS Huntsville; CSS
                                        Tuscaloosa; Crew Gun Boat Gaines

                                        Although the majority of regiments were formed as State Units, I believe
                                        there were units also assigned to the Confederate Government as Regulars in
                                        the form of a standing army, if you will, while State Units were more in line
                                        with the National Guard of today. Of course, in this I may be wrong, but
                                        that is my impression.

                                        Steve McGraw
                                      • Waldemar Winkler
                                        Thanks for your response. Responses always seem to include just one more snippet of information which elicits the aha experience in the depth of one s
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Mar 24, 2000
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                                          Thanks for your response. Responses always seem to include just one
                                          more snippet of information which elicits the "aha experience" in the
                                          depth of one's memory which says "I simply have to share this bit of
                                          trivia before it disappears forever".

                                          You mentioned in the Battle of Blakely (Mobile, Ala.) a marine corps.
                                          unit, CSMC, Sauad "D". I offer the fllowing additinal information:

                                          "The infantry of the 1860's was effective if the firepower of it's
                                          muskets could be efficiently managed (bear in mind an expert rifleman
                                          could get off one shot every 30 seconds). The basic military unit was
                                          not the foot soldier, but the rifle squad composed of 11 rifles, who
                                          moved forward, backward, left or right, as a unit on command. Two
                                          squads made a platoon & four platoons made a company of about 100
                                          soldiers, who also moved forward, backward, left or right, as a unit on
                                          command. Armies relentlessly drilled their soldiers to make them into
                                          formidable fighting units."

                                          Although differing somewhat from state to state, and also from the
                                          Federal regimental organization in some aspects, the typical
                                          Confederate regiment was comprised of ten companies of about 100
                                          privates each. Each company had a captain, three lieutenants, four
                                          sergeants, four corporals, and (early in the war) two musicians.

                                          --this is a quote from an internet site currently unknown. I acquired
                                          the information some years ago and did not have the necessary literacy
                                          to know how to save the file with the website's address. My deepest
                                          apologies to the author.

                                          In your last paragraph you referenced the similarity between
                                          Confederate State Units and our current Natinal Guard. That would
                                          appear to be in conformation witht the 2nd Amendment of our
                                          Constitution which allows states the right to raise a militia (the
                                          Confederate States Constitution being a mirror of the United States
                                          original Constitution with enough alterations to reflect the
                                          Confederate point of view). The national Confederate regulars were the
                                          core of the military organization, and had to be authorized by the
                                          Confederate Congress. At some point the state unit had agree to obey
                                          the authority of the Confederate national military, or lose the war
                                          before it began. In the case of my great grandfather's unit's case, the
                                          date was Nov. 19, 1861, when the 2nd Miss. Inf. Rgmt. became the 23d
                                          Miss. Inf. Rgmt., and ceased to be State Troops.


                                          tsalagibr-@... wrote:
                                          original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/civilwarwest/?start=724
                                          > Waldemar,
                                          > Your post on joining Confederate units was good and appears to be
                                          in line
                                          > with what I have found through following the histories of the 6th
                                          Alabama
                                          > Cavalry and the 15th Confederate Cavalry Regiment. I am a member of
                                          the 15th
                                          > and have only one small item to add to your excellent piece.
                                          > Regarding who the units belonged to (i.e. State Militias, The
                                          Army, etc),
                                          > I have found that at the Battle of Blakley, here in Mobile, the units
                                          listed
                                          > are under various headings by state (Mississippi, S. Carolina,
                                          Tennessee,
                                          > Maryland, etc) with one listing that is headed: Confederate Regulars.
                                          At
                                          > this particular battle the units shown as Regulars are:
                                          > ENGINEERS - Hutchinson's Co; Vernon's Co. 2nd Engingeers
                                          > CAVALRY - 15th Confederate Cav; 16th Confederate Cav
                                          > MARINE CORPS - CSMC, Squad "D"
                                          > CONFEDERATE NAVY - CSS Nashville; CSS Morgan; CSS Huntsville; CSS
                                          > Tuscaloosa; Crew Gun Boat Gaines
                                          >
                                          > Although the majority of regiments were formed as State Units, I
                                          believe
                                          > there were units also assigned to the Confederate Government as
                                          Regulars in
                                          > the form of a standing army, if you will, while State Units were more
                                          in line
                                          > with the National Guard of today. Of course, in this I may be wrong,
                                          but
                                          > that is my impression.
                                          >
                                          > Steve McGraw
                                        • Waldemar Winkler
                                          Thanks for your response. Responses always seem to include just one more snippet of information which elicits the aha experience in the depth of one s
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Mar 24, 2000
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                                            Thanks for your response. Responses always seem to include just one
                                            more snippet of information which elicits the "aha experience" in the
                                            depth of one's memory which says "I simply have to share this bit of
                                            trivia before it disappears forever".

                                            You mentioned in the Battle of Blakely (Mobile, Ala.) a marine corps.
                                            unit, CSMC, Sauad "D". I offer the fllowing additinal information:

                                            "The infantry of the 1860's was effective if the firepower of it's
                                            muskets could be efficiently managed (bear in mind an expert rifleman
                                            could get off one shot every 30 seconds). The basic military unit was
                                            not the foot soldier, but the rifle squad composed of 11 rifles, who
                                            moved forward, backward, left or right, as a unit on command. Two
                                            squads made a platoon & four platoons made a company of about 100
                                            soldiers, who also moved forward, backward, left or right, as a unit on
                                            command. Armies relentlessly drilled their soldiers to make them into
                                            formidable fighting units."

                                            Although differing somewhat from state to state, and also from the
                                            Federal regimental organization in some aspects, the typical
                                            Confederate regiment was comprised of ten companies of about 100
                                            privates each. Each company had a captain, three lieutenants, four
                                            sergeants, four corporals, and (early in the war) two musicians.

                                            --this is a quote from an internet site currently unknown. I acquired
                                            the information some years ago and did not have the necessary literacy
                                            to know how to save the file with the website's address. My deepest
                                            apologies to the author.

                                            In your last paragraph you referenced the similarity between
                                            Confederate State Units and our current Natinal Guard. That would
                                            appear to be in conformation witht the 2nd Amendment of our
                                            Constitution which allows states the right to raise a militia (the
                                            Confederate States Constitution being a mirror of the United States
                                            original Constitution with enough alterations to reflect the
                                            Confederate point of view). The national Confederate regulars were the
                                            core of the military organization, and had to be authorized by the
                                            Confederate Congress. At some point the state unit had agree to obey
                                            the authority of the Confederate national military, or lose the war
                                            before it began. In the case of my great grandfather's unit's case, the
                                            date was Nov. 19, 1861, when the 2nd Miss. Inf. Rgmt. became the 23d
                                            Miss. Inf. Rgmt., and ceased to be State Troops.


                                            tsalagibr-@... wrote:
                                            original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/civilwarwest/?start=724
                                            > Waldemar,
                                            > Your post on joining Confederate units was good and appears to be
                                            in line
                                            > with what I have found through following the histories of the 6th
                                            Alabama
                                            > Cavalry and the 15th Confederate Cavalry Regiment. I am a member of
                                            the 15th
                                            > and have only one small item to add to your excellent piece.
                                            > Regarding who the units belonged to (i.e. State Militias, The
                                            Army, etc),
                                            > I have found that at the Battle of Blakley, here in Mobile, the units
                                            listed
                                            > are under various headings by state (Mississippi, S. Carolina,
                                            Tennessee,
                                            > Maryland, etc) with one listing that is headed: Confederate Regulars.
                                            At
                                            > this particular battle the units shown as Regulars are:
                                            > ENGINEERS - Hutchinson's Co; Vernon's Co. 2nd Engingeers
                                            > CAVALRY - 15th Confederate Cav; 16th Confederate Cav
                                            > MARINE CORPS - CSMC, Squad "D"
                                            > CONFEDERATE NAVY - CSS Nashville; CSS Morgan; CSS Huntsville; CSS
                                            > Tuscaloosa; Crew Gun Boat Gaines
                                            >
                                            > Although the majority of regiments were formed as State Units, I
                                            believe
                                            > there were units also assigned to the Confederate Government as
                                            Regulars in
                                            > the form of a standing army, if you will, while State Units were more
                                            in line
                                            > with the National Guard of today. Of course, in this I may be wrong,
                                            but
                                            > that is my impression.
                                            >
                                            > Steve McGraw
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