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Rosecrans at Chickamauga

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  • josepharose@yahoo.com
    Joe, From the Chickamauga battlefield, Bragg wouldn t have even needed to cross the Tennesse. He would have to get around or over Missionary Ridge and cross
    Message 1 of 85 , Aug 1, 2001
      Joe,

      From the Chickamauga battlefield, Bragg wouldn't have even needed to
      cross the Tennesse. He would have to get around or over Missionary
      Ridge and cross the South Chickamauga, which was fordable in several
      places. He also had to contend with Granger's three brigades around
      Rossville. Having Forrest on his right flank, however, could have
      been tremendously useful, in this scenario.

      So I would say that Bragg had another shot at trying to cut Rosecrans
      off from his lines of supply, if he refrained from attacking at
      Chickamauga and moved to his right.

      Joseph




      From: hartshje@a...
      Date: Wed Aug 1, 2001 8:11 am
      Subject: Re: help for Rosecrans from other departments

      Joseph,

      I find it very interesting that one whole year later (after the
      Chattanooga fiasco and the grevious losses in the Atlanta campaign),
      Hood somehow managed to have a pontoon train with him and very easily
      outflanked Schofield out of Columbia by crossing the Duck River, even
      though Schofield had the "interior line"!! So my question is: Was it
      really so inconceivable for Bragg to have tried this at Chattanooga?
      And if we take it as a fact that Bragg DID NOT have pontoons (which I
      admit I don't know), then why couldn't HE have devised other means for
      crossing the Tennessee River. Afterall, didn't Union troops cross the
      river seemingly at will with no bridge (i.e., when Rosecrans forced
      Bragg out of Chattanooga in the first place, and later at Brown's
      Ferry, and again when Sherman's force crossed over).

      Regards,
      Joe H.
    • Bob Huddleston
      Well, there s Robert E. Lee, who was always volunteering to not only send troops, but even send himself out west...... Take care, Bob Judy and Bob Huddleston
      Message 85 of 85 , Aug 4, 2001
        Well, there's Robert E. Lee, who was always volunteering to not only
        send troops, but even send himself out west......

        Take care,

        Bob

        Judy and Bob Huddleston
        10643 Sperry Street
        Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
        303.451.6276 Adco@...


        --- In civilwarwest@y..., josepharose@y... wrote:
        > I was just asking whether, with Grant's large force, Rosecrans
        could
        > have been helped by pinning down Johnston's force or through
        Grant's
        > offering of his excess troops.

        Although I've already address the supposed "excess troops" issue
        elsewhere, I'd like to ask Mr. Rose to offer three examples where
        Civil War generals offered to send their forces elsewhere for someone
        else to command (as opposed to being ordered to do so).

        After all, if his request is so reasonable, we should be able to cite
        other examples quite readily.
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