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[civilwarwest] Artillery at Franklin

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  • Bob Watt
    Wayne, There were at least 3 batteries on the field at Franklin. The only one I am certain was engaged was 1st Missouri which was on the extreme right of the
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 8, 2000
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      Wayne,

      There were at least 3 batteries on the field at Franklin. The only one I
      am certain was engaged was 1st Missouri which was on the extreme right
      of the Confederate line following(???) Loring's Division. Evidently,
      they were in the rear of Adams' Brigade because they were near the
      Harpeth and within easy range of the Yankee batteries north of the
      Harpeth. The other two batteries present were Cowan's Mississippi
      Battery and Ferguson's South Carolina Battery. I am not sure when they
      took the field. Hope this helps.
      Bob
    • Steve Charles
      Bob, I m almost certain that the 6th Michigan Battery was at Franklin also, But I could be wrong. Steve Charles ... From: Bob Watt To:
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 8, 2000
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        Bob,
        I'm almost certain that the 6th Michigan Battery was at Franklin also, But
        I could be wrong.
        Steve Charles
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Bob Watt <BobWatt@...>
        To: CivilWarWest@egroups.com <CivilWarWest@egroups.com>
        Date: Wednesday, March 08, 2000 7:06 PM
        Subject: [civilwarwest] Artillery at Franklin


        >Wayne,
        >
        >There were at least 3 batteries on the field at Franklin. The only one I
        >am certain was engaged was 1st Missouri which was on the extreme right
        >of the Confederate line following(???) Loring's Division. Evidently,
        >they were in the rear of Adams' Brigade because they were near the
        >Harpeth and within easy range of the Yankee batteries north of the
        >Harpeth. The other two batteries present were Cowan's Mississippi
        >Battery and Ferguson's South Carolina Battery. I am not sure when they
        >took the field. Hope this helps.
        >Bob
        >
        >
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      • Wayne Mulig
        Bob, Thanks! The plot thickens ... I had only read vague references to the Confederate batteries at Franklin ... and then only two have been mentioned ...
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 8, 2000
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          Bob,

          Thanks! The plot thickens ... I had only read vague references to the
          Confederate batteries at Franklin ... and then only two have been mentioned
          ... Will continue my search into this matter ....
          Appreciate the leads ...

          Sincerely,
          Wayne Mulig

          >From: BobWatt@... (Bob Watt)
          >Reply-To: civilwarwest@egroups.com
          >To: CivilWarWest@egroups.com
          >Subject: [civilwarwest] Artillery at Franklin
          >Date: Wed, 8 Mar 2000 19:04:24 -0500 (EST)
          >
          >Wayne,
          >
          >There were at least 3 batteries on the field at Franklin. The only one I
          >am certain was engaged was 1st Missouri which was on the extreme right
          >of the Confederate line following(???) Loring's Division. Evidently,
          >they were in the rear of Adams' Brigade because they were near the
          >Harpeth and within easy range of the Yankee batteries north of the
          >Harpeth. The other two batteries present were Cowan's Mississippi
          >Battery and Ferguson's South Carolina Battery. I am not sure when they
          >took the field. Hope this helps.
          >Bob
          >
          >
          >------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >The race is on! We've got the most comprehensive elections coverage
          >for women. Get your election updates at
          >http://click.egroups.com/1/1877/1/_/14182/_/952560443/
          >
          >-- Talk to your group with your own voice!
          >-- http://www.egroups.com/VoiceChatPage?listName=civilwarwest&m=1
          >
          >

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        • Bob Watt
          Steve I am sure you are right, Wayne ask about Confederate Artillery as well. That s what I was responding to.I am sure there were much more CS units at
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 9, 2000
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            Steve I am sure you are right, Wayne ask about Confederate
            Artillery as well. That's what I was responding to.I am sure there were
            much more CS units at Franklin, but were not engaged. I don't know who
            gave the order,but the Confederate guns could NOT fire on the Federals.I
            am not a fan of Hood, he must have been out of his mind to order the
            attack. It was doomed from the get go. Thanks Bob
          • Andy Berstel
            bobwat-@webtv.net (bob watt) wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/civilwarwest/?start=678 ... were ... Federals.I ... So Hood not only deprives
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 9, 2000
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              bobwat-@... (bob watt) wrote:
              original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/civilwarwest/?start=678
              > Steve I am sure you are right, Wayne ask about Confederate
              > Artillery as well. That's what I was responding to.I am sure there
              were
              > much more CS units at Franklin, but were not engaged. I don't know who
              > gave the order,but the Confederate guns could NOT fire on the
              Federals.I
              > am not a fan of Hood, he must have been out of his mind to order the
              > attack. It was doomed from the get go. Thanks Bob
              >


              So Hood not only deprives himself of S.D. Lees corp and most of the
              armies guns, but also Lee's artillery expertise. Seems obvious a
              preliminary bombardment or artillery support was never a part of Hood's
              plan. Wonder why. Range too far? According to Wagner and other 1st hand
              accounts the few rounds the confederates did get off landed near the
              Carter house, well within the union lines. Did the ineffectiveness of
              the bombardment preceding Picketts charge make him think it was a waste
              of time and ammunition? While the Gettysburg bombardment didn't do the
              damage Lee might have hoped, it was still a terrifying experience for
              the Union soldiers in line there, something I would think, in general,
              would lower a defensive lines breaking point. Maybe it was just more
              troop discipline for Spring Hill, but that seems hard to believe.

              Andy
            • Wayne Mulig
              Andy and Bob, I agree with your summations that Hood was not too smart to attack the prepared Union positions at Franklin as he did. I am sure a preparatory
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 9, 2000
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                Andy and Bob,

                I agree with your summations that Hood was not too smart to attack the
                prepared Union positions at Franklin as he did. I am sure a preparatory
                artillery barrage or at least some artillery support would have been
                helpful, but so would the third infantry corps being involved. Judging from
                when S.D. Lee finally arrived at Franklin would probably not have been
                ready to attack much before dark. Would that time waiting for Lee been
                better used to determine weakness of Schofield's right? in actually
                observing the Union positions and the routes that Confederate troops would
                have had to approach the enemy lines? Would Hood succumb to the notion that
                flanking Schofield out of Franklin might have been the better course? And
                would the time spent waiting allowed the Union forces to further strengthen
                their positions? Would Wagner's Division been pulled back from its forward
                position? All the great "what if's", I know ... but is interesting to
                think about the alternatives .... Any thoughts, ladies and gents??

                Sincerely,
                Wayne Mulig


                >From: "Andy Berstel" <greenhaven@...>
                >Reply-To: civilwarwest@egroups.com
                >To: civilwarwest@...
                >Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Artillery at Franklin
                >Date: Thu, 09 Mar 2000 06:59:18 -0800
                >
                >bobwat-@... (bob watt) wrote:
                >original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/civilwarwest/?start=678
                > > Steve I am sure you are right, Wayne ask about Confederate
                > > Artillery as well. That's what I was responding to.I am sure there
                >were
                > > much more CS units at Franklin, but were not engaged. I don't know who
                > > gave the order,but the Confederate guns could NOT fire on the
                >Federals.I
                > > am not a fan of Hood, he must have been out of his mind to order the
                > > attack. It was doomed from the get go. Thanks Bob
                > >
                >
                >
                >So Hood not only deprives himself of S.D. Lees corp and most of the
                >armies guns, but also Lee's artillery expertise. Seems obvious a
                >preliminary bombardment or artillery support was never a part of Hood's
                >plan. Wonder why. Range too far? According to Wagner and other 1st hand
                >accounts the few rounds the confederates did get off landed near the
                >Carter house, well within the union lines. Did the ineffectiveness of
                >the bombardment preceding Picketts charge make him think it was a waste
                >of time and ammunition? While the Gettysburg bombardment didn't do the
                >damage Lee might have hoped, it was still a terrifying experience for
                >the Union soldiers in line there, something I would think, in general,
                >would lower a defensive lines breaking point. Maybe it was just more
                >troop discipline for Spring Hill, but that seems hard to believe.
                >
                >Andy
                >
                >
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                >

                ______________________________________________________
              • Wayne Mulig
                Andy and Bob, I agree with your summations that Hood was not too smart to attack the prepared Union positions at Franklin as he did. I am sure a preparatory
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 9, 2000
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                  Andy and Bob,

                  I agree with your summations that Hood was not too smart to attack the
                  prepared Union positions at Franklin as he did. I am sure a preparatory
                  artillery barrage or at least some artillery support would have been
                  helpful, but so would the third infantry corps being involved. Judging from
                  when S.D. Lee finally arrived at Franklin would probably not have been
                  ready to attack much before dark. Would that time waiting for Lee been
                  better used to determine weakness of Schofield's right? in actually
                  observing the Union positions and the routes that Confederate troops would
                  have had to approach the enemy lines? Would Hood succumb to the notion that
                  flanking Schofield out of Franklin might have been the better course? And
                  would the time spent waiting allowed the Union forces to further strengthen
                  their positions? Would Wagner's Division been pulled back from its forward
                  position? All the great "what if's", I know ... but is interesting to
                  think about the alternatives .... Any thoughts, ladies and gents??

                  Sincerely,
                  Wayne Mulig


                  >From: "Andy Berstel" <greenhaven@...>
                  >Reply-To: civilwarwest@egroups.com
                  >To: civilwarwest@...
                  >Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Artillery at Franklin
                  >Date: Thu, 09 Mar 2000 06:59:18 -0800
                  >
                  >bobwat-@... (bob watt) wrote:
                  >original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/civilwarwest/?start=678
                  > > Steve I am sure you are right, Wayne ask about Confederate
                  > > Artillery as well. That's what I was responding to.I am sure there
                  >were
                  > > much more CS units at Franklin, but were not engaged. I don't know who
                  > > gave the order,but the Confederate guns could NOT fire on the
                  >Federals.I
                  > > am not a fan of Hood, he must have been out of his mind to order the
                  > > attack. It was doomed from the get go. Thanks Bob
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >So Hood not only deprives himself of S.D. Lees corp and most of the
                  >armies guns, but also Lee's artillery expertise. Seems obvious a
                  >preliminary bombardment or artillery support was never a part of Hood's
                  >plan. Wonder why. Range too far? According to Wagner and other 1st hand
                  >accounts the few rounds the confederates did get off landed near the
                  >Carter house, well within the union lines. Did the ineffectiveness of
                  >the bombardment preceding Picketts charge make him think it was a waste
                  >of time and ammunition? While the Gettysburg bombardment didn't do the
                  >damage Lee might have hoped, it was still a terrifying experience for
                  >the Union soldiers in line there, something I would think, in general,
                  >would lower a defensive lines breaking point. Maybe it was just more
                  >troop discipline for Spring Hill, but that seems hard to believe.
                  >
                  >Andy
                  >
                  >
                  >------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  >Successful or aspiring career women won't want to miss Women.Future!
                  >Today's top business women share how they led their way to the top.
                  >Find out how at
                  >http://click.egroups.com/1/1876/1/_/14182/_/952613995/
                  >
                  >-- Easily schedule meetings and events using the group calendar!
                  >-- http://www.egroups.com/cal?listname=civilwarwest&m=1
                  >
                  >

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