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  • allnoles@aol.com
    Greetings. Jim Morgan here. Live in Virginia and most of what I know about the Late Unpleasantness is Eastern Theater. However, I have two g-g-grandfathers
    Message 1 of 14 , Sep 11 10:04 AM
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      Greetings. Jim Morgan here. Live in Virginia and most of what I know
      about the Late Unpleasantness is Eastern Theater. However, I have two
      g-g-grandfathers who served in the Army of Tennessee so I feel as if I
      should pay more attention to where they were.

      Did once stand on Shy's Hill in Nashville in a spot which had to have
      been very near where Capt. James M. Hicks, 41st Mississippi Infantry,
      stood in December, '64. A very moving experience.

      My other ancestor was Pvt Alfred Morgan who was with the Pointe Coupee
      (Louisiana) Artillery from April 21, 1862 until he was surrendered at
      Vicksburg. After his exchange, he joined the 6th Louisiana Battery,
      aka, Grosse Tete Flying Artillery, and participated in the Red River
      campaign.

      I'd be interested in discussing anything about the western theater.
      Used to be on the Gettysburg Discussion Group and occasionally say
      something on the Antietam Group. Hope to be active on this one.

      Regards to all.
    • Dick Weeks
      ... Hi Jim, Welcome aboard. Permit me to try to expand a little on your background. Just for those that might not know, Jim is a personal friend of mine and
      Message 2 of 14 , Sep 11 3:45 PM
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        allnoles@... wrote:
        >
        > Greetings. Jim Morgan here. Live in Virginia and most of what I know
        > about the Late Unpleasantness is Eastern Theater. However, I have two
        > g-g-grandfathers who served in the Army of Tennessee so I feel as if I
        > should pay more attention to where they were.
        >
        > Did once stand on Shy's Hill in Nashville in a spot which had to have
        > been very near where Capt. James M. Hicks, 41st Mississippi Infantry,
        > stood in December, '64. A very moving experience.
        >
        > My other ancestor was Pvt Alfred Morgan who was with the Pointe Coupee
        > (Louisiana) Artillery from April 21, 1862 until he was surrendered at
        > Vicksburg. After his exchange, he joined the 6th Louisiana Battery,
        > aka, Grosse Tete Flying Artillery, and participated in the Red River
        > campaign.
        >
        > I'd be interested in discussing anything about the western theater.
        > Used to be on the Gettysburg Discussion Group and occasionally say
        > something on the Antietam Group. Hope to be active on this one.
        >
        > Regards to all.
        >
        Hi Jim,

        Welcome aboard. Permit me to try to expand a little on your background.
        Just for those that might not know, Jim is a personal friend of mine and
        one of the "true" Civil War Buffs that I know. Many claim to be but Jim
        means it. I have had the pleasure of knowing him and his lovely family
        for a couple of years now. While Jim is an expert on Civl War Artillery
        (see his articles on my website at:
        http://www.civilwarhome.com/civilwarweapons.htm
        two of the three articles that I have linked from there are authored by
        Jim) his true love is Civil War Music. My friends he ranks up there with
        Bobby Horton any day of the week. You might have seen his tapes in some
        of the Visitor's Centers you have visited. They are "60's Music" and
        "Just Before The Battle." Just dandies! Sorry Jim but I just had to
        expand a bit.

        Now along the same lines, since you mentioned Nashville in your intro,
        we recently had a question that basically asked "Why would Hood, after
        he had been so chewed up at Franklin, move what was left of his army up
        and invest Nashville." Steve had a good answer that I think I agree
        with, "Since the enemy left the field, he thought he had won." However,
        I think we should explore this a little more.

        Since most of my energy in the past has been exploring the battles along
        Interstate 95 between Washington and Richmond, I need someone to expand
        a little more on this beauty. Here we have a man, Hood, while a pretty
        good lower commander (Gettysburg for instance), apparently had no
        concept as to how to fight a full army. After Franklin, he takes an army
        that has been run through a "meat grinder" where he left 5 of his finest
        generals on the front porch of a home dead, lost a little over 6,000 men
        compared to the Union's of less than 3,000 and moves up to invest a city
        where he is clearly outnumbered and outgunned. It is a puzzlement. I
        hope someone who has a lot more knowledge than me can offer some insight
        or personal opinion on this.

        I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
        Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
        http://www.civilwarhome.com
      • Allnoles@aol.com
        In a message dated 9/11/99 6:48:47 PM Eastern Daylight Time, shotgun@civilwarhome.com writes: Hi Dick, Thanks very much for the kind words.
        Message 3 of 14 , Sep 12 6:11 AM
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          In a message dated 9/11/99 6:48:47 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          shotgun@... writes:

          Hi Dick,
          Thanks very much for the kind words.

          << Now along the same lines, since you mentioned Nashville in your intro,
          we recently had a question that basically asked "Why would Hood, after
          he had been so chewed up at Franklin, move what was left of his army up
          and invest Nashville." Steve had a good answer that I think I agree
          with, "Since the enemy left the field, he thought he had won." However,
          I think we should explore this a little more.

          Since most of my energy in the past has been exploring the battles along
          Interstate 95 between Washington and Richmond, I need someone to expand
          a little more on this beauty. Here we have a man, Hood, while a pretty
          good lower commander (Gettysburg for instance), apparently had no
          concept as to how to fight a full army. After Franklin, he takes an army
          that has been run through a "meat grinder" where he left 5 of his finest
          generals on the front porch of a home dead, lost a little over 6,000 men
          compared to the Union's of less than 3,000 and moves up to invest a city
          where he is clearly outnumbered and outgunned. It is a puzzlement. I
          hope someone who has a lot more knowledge than me can offer some insight
          or personal opinion on this. >>

          Without doing a lot more reading on Hood than I've done, I can offer
          only a couple of speculations about his motivations after Franklin. Seems to
          me that either Hood was simply desperate and knew the Confederacy needed a
          big win at almost any cost or he developed a severe case of "Burnsides
          Disease." That is, like Burnside at Antietam and Fredericksburg, Hood tried
          something and, when it didn't work, he didn't know what to do except try it
          again. So he went after Nashville.
          Of course, Steve could be right in speculating that Hood had thought it
          DID work, yet Hood was an experienced and very aggressive soldier who, by
          late '64, ought to have been able to interpret the meaning of an enemy's
          movements.

          Regards,
          Jim
        • Allnoles@aol.com
          In a message dated 9/11/99 6:48:47 PM Eastern Daylight Time, shotgun@civilwarhome.com writes: Hi Dick, Thanks very much for the kind words.
          Message 4 of 14 , Sep 12 6:11 AM
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            In a message dated 9/11/99 6:48:47 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
            shotgun@... writes:

            Hi Dick,
            Thanks very much for the kind words.

            << Now along the same lines, since you mentioned Nashville in your intro,
            we recently had a question that basically asked "Why would Hood, after
            he had been so chewed up at Franklin, move what was left of his army up
            and invest Nashville." Steve had a good answer that I think I agree
            with, "Since the enemy left the field, he thought he had won." However,
            I think we should explore this a little more.

            Since most of my energy in the past has been exploring the battles along
            Interstate 95 between Washington and Richmond, I need someone to expand
            a little more on this beauty. Here we have a man, Hood, while a pretty
            good lower commander (Gettysburg for instance), apparently had no
            concept as to how to fight a full army. After Franklin, he takes an army
            that has been run through a "meat grinder" where he left 5 of his finest
            generals on the front porch of a home dead, lost a little over 6,000 men
            compared to the Union's of less than 3,000 and moves up to invest a city
            where he is clearly outnumbered and outgunned. It is a puzzlement. I
            hope someone who has a lot more knowledge than me can offer some insight
            or personal opinion on this. >>

            Without doing a lot more reading on Hood than I've done, I can offer
            only a couple of speculations about his motivations after Franklin. Seems to
            me that either Hood was simply desperate and knew the Confederacy needed a
            big win at almost any cost or he developed a severe case of "Burnsides
            Disease." That is, like Burnside at Antietam and Fredericksburg, Hood tried
            something and, when it didn't work, he didn't know what to do except try it
            again. So he went after Nashville.
            Of course, Steve could be right in speculating that Hood had thought it
            DID work, yet Hood was an experienced and very aggressive soldier who, by
            late '64, ought to have been able to interpret the meaning of an enemy's
            movements.

            Regards,
            Jim
          • Rms1864@aol.com
            according to Richard m.mcmurry,in his excellent work, john bell hood and the war for southern independence, on page 176-177. he says hood had only about
            Message 5 of 14 , Sep 12 5:16 PM
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              according to Richard m.mcmurry,in his excellent work, john bell hood and the
              war for southern independence, on page 176-177. he says "hood had only about
              25,000 men left and his choices were limited. if he fell back, his army would
              be unable to challenge either Sherman, in Georgia, or the unionist in
              Tennessee. about the only option was to move toward Nashville. perhaps the
              army could take a strong position near the city and repulse efforts of the
              federal to drive it away. i wonder why at Franklin, why hood didn't wait for
              the artillery, before ordering the attack. he could have waited for Stephen
              d. lee to show up, on the scene before giving the order to attack. also
              Nashville, was one of the most heavily fortified cities at the time according
              to Stanley horn. i also thought it was six generals killed at Franklin not
              five. i guess i was mistaken. i live about 50 yards from travelers rest where
              hood made his headquarters during the battle. i like this discussion group.
              thanks roger
            • Rms1864@aol.com
              according to Richard m.mcmurry,in his excellent work, john bell hood and the war for southern independence, on page 176-177. he says hood had only about
              Message 6 of 14 , Sep 12 5:16 PM
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                according to Richard m.mcmurry,in his excellent work, john bell hood and the
                war for southern independence, on page 176-177. he says "hood had only about
                25,000 men left and his choices were limited. if he fell back, his army would
                be unable to challenge either Sherman, in Georgia, or the unionist in
                Tennessee. about the only option was to move toward Nashville. perhaps the
                army could take a strong position near the city and repulse efforts of the
                federal to drive it away. i wonder why at Franklin, why hood didn't wait for
                the artillery, before ordering the attack. he could have waited for Stephen
                d. lee to show up, on the scene before giving the order to attack. also
                Nashville, was one of the most heavily fortified cities at the time according
                to Stanley horn. i also thought it was six generals killed at Franklin not
                five. i guess i was mistaken. i live about 50 yards from travelers rest where
                hood made his headquarters during the battle. i like this discussion group.
                thanks roger
              • Dick Weeks
                ... Good post Roger. I especially appreciate the reference. Since I made the post about the 5 Confederate Generals I thought I had better cite my reference.
                Message 7 of 14 , Sep 12 7:48 PM
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                  Rms1864@... wrote:
                  >
                  > according to Richard m.mcmurry,in his excellent work, john bell hood and the
                  > war for southern independence, on page 176-177. he says "hood had only about
                  > 25,000 men left and his choices were limited. if he fell back, his army would
                  > be unable to challenge either Sherman, in Georgia, or the unionist in
                  > Tennessee. about the only option was to move toward Nashville. perhaps the
                  > army could take a strong position near the city and repulse efforts of the
                  > federal to drive it away. i wonder why at Franklin, why hood didn't wait for
                  > the artillery, before ordering the attack. he could have waited for Stephen
                  > d. lee to show up, on the scene before giving the order to attack. also
                  > Nashville, was one of the most heavily fortified cities at the time according
                  > to Stanley horn. i also thought it was six generals killed at Franklin not
                  > five. i guess i was mistaken. i live about 50 yards from travelers rest where
                  > hood made his headquarters during the battle. i like this discussion group.
                  > thanks roger

                  Good post Roger. I especially appreciate the reference. Since I made the
                  post about the 5 Confederate Generals I thought I had better cite my
                  reference. Fox's Regimental Losses shows that the Confederate generals
                  killed at Franklin were Cleburne, Adams, Strahl, Gist, and Granberry. I
                  have seen where there were 6 generals killed but I think the 6th was a
                  Union one. However, for the life of me I can't find out for sure. I will
                  dig through the ORs tomorrow and see what I can come up with.

                  I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
                  Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                  http://www.civilwarhome.com
                • Dick Weeks
                  ... Good post Roger. I especially appreciate the reference. Since I made the post about the 5 Confederate Generals I thought I had better cite my reference.
                  Message 8 of 14 , Sep 12 7:48 PM
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                    Rms1864@... wrote:
                    >
                    > according to Richard m.mcmurry,in his excellent work, john bell hood and the
                    > war for southern independence, on page 176-177. he says "hood had only about
                    > 25,000 men left and his choices were limited. if he fell back, his army would
                    > be unable to challenge either Sherman, in Georgia, or the unionist in
                    > Tennessee. about the only option was to move toward Nashville. perhaps the
                    > army could take a strong position near the city and repulse efforts of the
                    > federal to drive it away. i wonder why at Franklin, why hood didn't wait for
                    > the artillery, before ordering the attack. he could have waited for Stephen
                    > d. lee to show up, on the scene before giving the order to attack. also
                    > Nashville, was one of the most heavily fortified cities at the time according
                    > to Stanley horn. i also thought it was six generals killed at Franklin not
                    > five. i guess i was mistaken. i live about 50 yards from travelers rest where
                    > hood made his headquarters during the battle. i like this discussion group.
                    > thanks roger

                    Good post Roger. I especially appreciate the reference. Since I made the
                    post about the 5 Confederate Generals I thought I had better cite my
                    reference. Fox's Regimental Losses shows that the Confederate generals
                    killed at Franklin were Cleburne, Adams, Strahl, Gist, and Granberry. I
                    have seen where there were 6 generals killed but I think the 6th was a
                    Union one. However, for the life of me I can't find out for sure. I will
                    dig through the ORs tomorrow and see what I can come up with.

                    I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
                    Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                    http://www.civilwarhome.com
                  • L.A. Chambliss
                    Hey Shotgun, no need to dig through the ORs. Gen. John C. Carter CSA was the mortally wounded one. Why anybody bothers to make this distinction I am not
                    Message 9 of 14 , Sep 12 8:30 PM
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                      Hey Shotgun, no need to dig through the ORs. Gen. John C. Carter CSA was the
                      "mortally wounded" one. Why anybody bothers to make this distinction I am not sure
                      as Carter died either that night or the next day. If he had lingered for weeks or
                      months before expiring I could understand.


                      Yrs. for quibbling & mortuary science..... ;-)

                      Laurie
                      Civil War Interactive
                      www.almshouse.com


                      Dick Weeks wrote:

                      > Rms1864@... wrote:
                      > >
                      > > according to Richard m.mcmurry,in his excellent work, john bell hood and the
                      > > war for southern independence, on page 176-177. he says "hood had only about
                      > > 25,000 men left and his choices were limited. if he fell back, his army would
                      > > be unable to challenge either Sherman, in Georgia, or the unionist in
                      > > Tennessee. about the only option was to move toward Nashville. perhaps the
                      > > army could take a strong position near the city and repulse efforts of the
                      > > federal to drive it away. i wonder why at Franklin, why hood didn't wait for
                      > > the artillery, before ordering the attack. he could have waited for Stephen
                      > > d. lee to show up, on the scene before giving the order to attack. also
                      > > Nashville, was one of the most heavily fortified cities at the time according
                      > > to Stanley horn. i also thought it was six generals killed at Franklin not
                      > > five. i guess i was mistaken. i live about 50 yards from travelers rest where
                      > > hood made his headquarters during the battle. i like this discussion group.
                      > > thanks roger
                      >
                      > Good post Roger. I especially appreciate the reference. Since I made the
                      > post about the 5 Confederate Generals I thought I had better cite my
                      > reference. Fox's Regimental Losses shows that the Confederate generals
                      > killed at Franklin were Cleburne, Adams, Strahl, Gist, and Granberry. I
                      > have seen where there were 6 generals killed but I think the 6th was a
                      > Union one. However, for the life of me I can't find out for sure. I will
                      > dig through the ORs tomorrow and see what I can come up with.
                      >
                      > I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
                      > Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                      > http://www.civilwarhome.com
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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                      > Start with up to 150 Points for joining!
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                    • L.A. Chambliss
                      Hey Shotgun, no need to dig through the ORs. Gen. John C. Carter CSA was the mortally wounded one. Why anybody bothers to make this distinction I am not
                      Message 10 of 14 , Sep 12 8:30 PM
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                        Hey Shotgun, no need to dig through the ORs. Gen. John C. Carter CSA was the
                        "mortally wounded" one. Why anybody bothers to make this distinction I am not sure
                        as Carter died either that night or the next day. If he had lingered for weeks or
                        months before expiring I could understand.


                        Yrs. for quibbling & mortuary science..... ;-)

                        Laurie
                        Civil War Interactive
                        www.almshouse.com


                        Dick Weeks wrote:

                        > Rms1864@... wrote:
                        > >
                        > > according to Richard m.mcmurry,in his excellent work, john bell hood and the
                        > > war for southern independence, on page 176-177. he says "hood had only about
                        > > 25,000 men left and his choices were limited. if he fell back, his army would
                        > > be unable to challenge either Sherman, in Georgia, or the unionist in
                        > > Tennessee. about the only option was to move toward Nashville. perhaps the
                        > > army could take a strong position near the city and repulse efforts of the
                        > > federal to drive it away. i wonder why at Franklin, why hood didn't wait for
                        > > the artillery, before ordering the attack. he could have waited for Stephen
                        > > d. lee to show up, on the scene before giving the order to attack. also
                        > > Nashville, was one of the most heavily fortified cities at the time according
                        > > to Stanley horn. i also thought it was six generals killed at Franklin not
                        > > five. i guess i was mistaken. i live about 50 yards from travelers rest where
                        > > hood made his headquarters during the battle. i like this discussion group.
                        > > thanks roger
                        >
                        > Good post Roger. I especially appreciate the reference. Since I made the
                        > post about the 5 Confederate Generals I thought I had better cite my
                        > reference. Fox's Regimental Losses shows that the Confederate generals
                        > killed at Franklin were Cleburne, Adams, Strahl, Gist, and Granberry. I
                        > have seen where there were 6 generals killed but I think the 6th was a
                        > Union one. However, for the life of me I can't find out for sure. I will
                        > dig through the ORs tomorrow and see what I can come up with.
                        >
                        > I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
                        > Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                        > http://www.civilwarhome.com
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        > MyPoints-Free Rewards When You're Online.
                        > Start with up to 150 Points for joining!
                        > http://clickhere.egroups.com/click/805
                        >
                        > eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/civilwarwest
                        > http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
                      • pedinkler@frontier.net
                        Good day to all. I have been a member for a month or so but haven t been able to visit at all as the summer is my busiest time of the year. I have been
                        Message 11 of 14 , Oct 3, 1999
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                          Good day to all. I have been a member for a month or so but haven't
                          been able to visit at all as the summer is my busiest time of the year.


                          I have been researching the history of the 23d Mississippi Infantry
                          Regiment. It all started with a copy of a letter my great-frandfather
                          wrote in which he breifly detailed the places he visited during the
                          war. Not being from the south I thought is would be "fun" to look on a
                          map to se whre these places he visited were located. That was six
                          years ago. I couldn't find much on the map. What I did find was more
                          questions which, of course, led to more and more questions which needed
                          answers. It is a never ending quest.

                          As I have introduced myself I must pose a question relating to Fort
                          Donelson. The question is, simply, does the following statement make
                          sense? If not, where have I missed sometning? My premise is the
                          strategy devised by Genreal Grant and Commodore Foote was to trick
                          Johnston into believing an invasion of the Mississippi River was about
                          to begin.

                          On January 7, 1862, an elaborate series of deceptive troop movements
                          begins southward towards Columbus.

                          Commodore Foote makes a reconnaissance with 3 gunboats down the
                          Mississippi to within 2 miles of Columbus.
                          At the same time Grant sends General McClernand with 5000 troops and
                          two batteries of light artillery on another reconnaissance in the
                          general direction of Columbus. McClernand eventually takes a position
                          commanding the road between Paducah and Columbus.
                          At this point Grant (also with 5000 troops) joins McClernand and moves
                          the now 10,000 man force to a point 10 miles east of Columbus. This
                          troop movement should have appeared to be an expedition to cut supply
                          lines between Columbus and its supply depot, Union City.
                          While this was going on, another 5000 troops under the command of
                          General Smith leaves Cairo in the general direction of Columbus.
                          Once Confederate scouts reported communication links had been
                          established between Grant, McClernand, and Smith, this charade should
                          have appeared to be the beginnings of a major campaign to gain control
                          of the Mississippi River.
                          Already prepared for exactly this kind of attack, Johnston should have
                          done nothing...and he did nothing.
                          As luck would have it, President Lincoln had ordered a general military
                          advance southward all along the front from the Atlantic seaboard to the
                          Mississippi River to take place around the first of February.
                          Movement was occurring everywhere. All Confederate forces were on
                          alert and commanders were hesitant to release their reserve troops to
                          support others weakened by Federal attacks.


                          Suddenly, on January 21, Grant returns his entire expedition to Cairo.
                          When General Johnston hears about this sudden move a few days later,
                          he correctly concludes Forts Henry and Donelson were the targets all
                          along, but time is against him. Reasonably certain the fall of Forts
                          Henry and Donelson was only a matter of time, and knowing he could not
                          hold Kentucky without the forts in Confederate possession, Johnston
                          abandons Bowling Green and moves his thirty thousand men to Nashville.
                          Around the 1st of February troops including D. W. Wade were ordered
                          out of winter quarters and sent to Fort Donelson via Clarksville,
                          Kentucky. This was movement of the troops towards Fort Donelson. The
                          23rd Regiment arrived on Feb 7.
                        • pedinkler@frontier.net
                          Good day to all. I have been a member for a month or so but haven t been able to visit at all as the summer is my busiest time of the year. I have been
                          Message 12 of 14 , Oct 3, 1999
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                            Good day to all. I have been a member for a month or so but haven't
                            been able to visit at all as the summer is my busiest time of the year.


                            I have been researching the history of the 23d Mississippi Infantry
                            Regiment. It all started with a copy of a letter my great-frandfather
                            wrote in which he breifly detailed the places he visited during the
                            war. Not being from the south I thought is would be "fun" to look on a
                            map to se whre these places he visited were located. That was six
                            years ago. I couldn't find much on the map. What I did find was more
                            questions which, of course, led to more and more questions which needed
                            answers. It is a never ending quest.

                            As I have introduced myself I must pose a question relating to Fort
                            Donelson. The question is, simply, does the following statement make
                            sense? If not, where have I missed sometning? My premise is the
                            strategy devised by Genreal Grant and Commodore Foote was to trick
                            Johnston into believing an invasion of the Mississippi River was about
                            to begin.

                            On January 7, 1862, an elaborate series of deceptive troop movements
                            begins southward towards Columbus.

                            Commodore Foote makes a reconnaissance with 3 gunboats down the
                            Mississippi to within 2 miles of Columbus.
                            At the same time Grant sends General McClernand with 5000 troops and
                            two batteries of light artillery on another reconnaissance in the
                            general direction of Columbus. McClernand eventually takes a position
                            commanding the road between Paducah and Columbus.
                            At this point Grant (also with 5000 troops) joins McClernand and moves
                            the now 10,000 man force to a point 10 miles east of Columbus. This
                            troop movement should have appeared to be an expedition to cut supply
                            lines between Columbus and its supply depot, Union City.
                            While this was going on, another 5000 troops under the command of
                            General Smith leaves Cairo in the general direction of Columbus.
                            Once Confederate scouts reported communication links had been
                            established between Grant, McClernand, and Smith, this charade should
                            have appeared to be the beginnings of a major campaign to gain control
                            of the Mississippi River.
                            Already prepared for exactly this kind of attack, Johnston should have
                            done nothing...and he did nothing.
                            As luck would have it, President Lincoln had ordered a general military
                            advance southward all along the front from the Atlantic seaboard to the
                            Mississippi River to take place around the first of February.
                            Movement was occurring everywhere. All Confederate forces were on
                            alert and commanders were hesitant to release their reserve troops to
                            support others weakened by Federal attacks.


                            Suddenly, on January 21, Grant returns his entire expedition to Cairo.
                            When General Johnston hears about this sudden move a few days later,
                            he correctly concludes Forts Henry and Donelson were the targets all
                            along, but time is against him. Reasonably certain the fall of Forts
                            Henry and Donelson was only a matter of time, and knowing he could not
                            hold Kentucky without the forts in Confederate possession, Johnston
                            abandons Bowling Green and moves his thirty thousand men to Nashville.
                            Around the 1st of February troops including D. W. Wade were ordered
                            out of winter quarters and sent to Fort Donelson via Clarksville,
                            Kentucky. This was movement of the troops towards Fort Donelson. The
                            23rd Regiment arrived on Feb 7.
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