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[civilwarwest] Re: Earthworks, Anyone?

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  • David Woodbury
    ... Shoup s so-called Shoupades were kind of triangular forts in Johnston s Chattahoochee River Line, and (working from sometimes faulty memory) could hold
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 10, 2000
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      >At 8:07 PM -0800 2/10/00, Chris Huff wrote:
      >There are some fortifications here in Atlanta (Vinings to be
      >precise), designed by a man named Shupe. These particular
      >fortifications are located on the northern side of the Chatahoochee
      >at the bridgehead of the railroad bridge crossing the river just
      >above the mouth of Nickajack Creek. They are supposed to be radical
      >in design and very effective (real one of a kind).

      Shoup's so-called "Shoupades" were kind of triangular forts in
      Johnston's Chattahoochee River Line, and (working from sometimes
      faulty memory) could hold about a company of men. Jutting out from
      the main line at regular intervals, they were intended to allow small
      pockets of men to put down a lethal crossing fire on any approach.
      The idea was that the main line could he held with small numbers,
      while the bulk of the army could stand ready across the river, ready
      to march rapidly up or down stream to contest a Federal crossing.
      True to form, though, Johsnston fell back across the river without
      testing Shoup's works, and the Federals crossed more or less at
      leisure.

      William Scaife wrote an essay on Shoupades for an issue of "Civil War
      Regiments" journal, which included some photos of some extant works.
      He also published a book on the Chattahoochee River Line, I believe
      (distinct from his Atlanta Campaign titles) which is probably still
      available at places like Oxford Books in town there. The River Line
      book includes a photo of a model or diorama of a Shoupade.

      I think the founder, or at least one of the co-founders of the
      Fortification Study Group mentioned by Horwitz is Dale Floyd.

      David Woodbury
      Palo Alto, Calif.
    • David Woodbury
      ... Shoup s so-called Shoupades were kind of triangular forts in Johnston s Chattahoochee River Line, and (working from sometimes faulty memory) could hold
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 10, 2000
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        >At 8:07 PM -0800 2/10/00, Chris Huff wrote:
        >There are some fortifications here in Atlanta (Vinings to be
        >precise), designed by a man named Shupe. These particular
        >fortifications are located on the northern side of the Chatahoochee
        >at the bridgehead of the railroad bridge crossing the river just
        >above the mouth of Nickajack Creek. They are supposed to be radical
        >in design and very effective (real one of a kind).

        Shoup's so-called "Shoupades" were kind of triangular forts in
        Johnston's Chattahoochee River Line, and (working from sometimes
        faulty memory) could hold about a company of men. Jutting out from
        the main line at regular intervals, they were intended to allow small
        pockets of men to put down a lethal crossing fire on any approach.
        The idea was that the main line could he held with small numbers,
        while the bulk of the army could stand ready across the river, ready
        to march rapidly up or down stream to contest a Federal crossing.
        True to form, though, Johsnston fell back across the river without
        testing Shoup's works, and the Federals crossed more or less at
        leisure.

        William Scaife wrote an essay on Shoupades for an issue of "Civil War
        Regiments" journal, which included some photos of some extant works.
        He also published a book on the Chattahoochee River Line, I believe
        (distinct from his Atlanta Campaign titles) which is probably still
        available at places like Oxford Books in town there. The River Line
        book includes a photo of a model or diorama of a Shoupade.

        I think the founder, or at least one of the co-founders of the
        Fortification Study Group mentioned by Horwitz is Dale Floyd.

        David Woodbury
        Palo Alto, Calif.
      • Chris Huff
        Dear Folks, I am reading an absolutely wonderful book by Tony Horwitz entitled Confederates in the Attic, Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War . For those
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 10, 2000
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          Dear Folks,
           
          I am reading an absolutely wonderful book by Tony Horwitz entitled "Confederates in the Attic, Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War". For those of you who have not yet "inhaled" it,  it is an exploration of why, after so much time has passed, the Civil War still holds us in fascination.
           
          In the book there is a park ranger who formed a civil war fortification study group. That sounds like fun to this old girl. One of the tools this group uses is infrared aerial photos.
           
          There are some fortifications here in Atlanta (Vinings to be precise), designed by a man named Shupe. These particular fortifications are located on the northern side of the Chatahoochee at the bridgehead of the railroad bridge crossing the river just above the mouth of Nickajack Creek.  They are supposed to be radical in design and very effective (real one of a kind). I have been able to find out very little about the actual location and configuration of these breast works and would be interested in knowing if any of you either; belong to a fortifications study group and if so, where can a body get these infrared photos or if you know of how I could contact such a group. Any information would be greatly appreciated.
           
          Chris Huff
          Atlanta, GA 
        • Chris Huff
          Dear David, Thank you! Thank you! I will seek out Scaife s book, although alas, our beloved Oxford Books has gone the way of all flesh. I am, myself, dying to
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 10, 2000
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            Dear David,
             
            Thank you! Thank you! I will seek out Scaife's book, although alas, our beloved Oxford Books has gone the way of all flesh. 
             
            I am, myself,  dying to see these things on the ground, though. I have a very bad feeling that most, if not all of these unique fortifications have been destroyed, lost to the bulldozer as much of what was Johnston's River Line is covered by houses. My greatest hope is that not much grading has been done around the rail lines and that might be my best bet. Maybe I can contact Mr. Floyd and he will have some idea about getting some aerial shots so I can actually go find and see, what, if anything, is left.
             
            Thanks again for the references!
             
            Chris Huff
            Atlanta, GA
          • Chris Huff
            Dear David, Thank you! Thank you! I will seek out Scaife s book, although alas, our beloved Oxford Books has gone the way of all flesh. I am, myself, dying to
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 10, 2000
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              Dear David,
               
              Thank you! Thank you! I will seek out Scaife's book, although alas, our beloved Oxford Books has gone the way of all flesh. 
               
              I am, myself,  dying to see these things on the ground, though. I have a very bad feeling that most, if not all of these unique fortifications have been destroyed, lost to the bulldozer as much of what was Johnston's River Line is covered by houses. My greatest hope is that not much grading has been done around the rail lines and that might be my best bet. Maybe I can contact Mr. Floyd and he will have some idea about getting some aerial shots so I can actually go find and see, what, if anything, is left.
               
              Thanks again for the references!
               
              Chris Huff
              Atlanta, GA
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