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[civilwarwest] Turning Point

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  • Chris Huff
    I ll have to agree with Don about the negotiated peace part, but I m going to differ about the first shot. :-) Richard H. McMurray (Two Great Rebel Armies : An
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 6, 2000
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      I'll have to agree with Don about the negotiated peace part, but I'm going to differ about the first shot. :-) Richard H. McMurray (Two Great Rebel Armies : An Essay in Confederate Military History, not the Hood biography guy...) is fond of saying the first shot of the war was not the "accidental" shot fired at Fort Sumter, but was actually in Pensacola, Florida where tensions were also growing. For the life of me I can't find the reference in the OR I'm looking for (maybe I just imagined I saw it there or I get so fascinated reading it I keep forgetting to look for that one thing and let my mind wander...great reading about Pensacola the political problems, logistical problems and some of the naval preparations) and I can't remember how McMurray said that he knew. I will ask him when I see him next time which should be in another week or so. He, too, is biased about the importance of the war in the West (naturally the first shot fired in the war was in the West if not in Department 2 ;-) ). 
       
       I think most scholars agree that the East was a stalemate, although it is the hands down sentimental favorite. They sure don't agree why it was a stalemate, though I'm sure General Lee's ability was one very big factor. Dr. McMurray likes to joke about Lee by saying that if Lee hadn't lost Stonewall Jackson, we would still be fighting the war...Truman would have dropped the bomb, but Lee was still fighting...hmmm...I wonder which side the Japanese would have been on.
       
      Chris Huff
      Atlanta, GA
    • Chris Huff
      I ll have to agree with Don about the negotiated peace part, but I m going to differ about the first shot. :-) Richard H. McMurray (Two Great Rebel Armies : An
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 6, 2000
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        I'll have to agree with Don about the negotiated peace part, but I'm going to differ about the first shot. :-) Richard H. McMurray (Two Great Rebel Armies : An Essay in Confederate Military History, not the Hood biography guy...) is fond of saying the first shot of the war was not the "accidental" shot fired at Fort Sumter, but was actually in Pensacola, Florida where tensions were also growing. For the life of me I can't find the reference in the OR I'm looking for (maybe I just imagined I saw it there or I get so fascinated reading it I keep forgetting to look for that one thing and let my mind wander...great reading about Pensacola the political problems, logistical problems and some of the naval preparations) and I can't remember how McMurray said that he knew. I will ask him when I see him next time which should be in another week or so. He, too, is biased about the importance of the war in the West (naturally the first shot fired in the war was in the West if not in Department 2 ;-) ). 
         
         I think most scholars agree that the East was a stalemate, although it is the hands down sentimental favorite. They sure don't agree why it was a stalemate, though I'm sure General Lee's ability was one very big factor. Dr. McMurray likes to joke about Lee by saying that if Lee hadn't lost Stonewall Jackson, we would still be fighting the war...Truman would have dropped the bomb, but Lee was still fighting...hmmm...I wonder which side the Japanese would have been on.
         
        Chris Huff
        Atlanta, GA
      • JOHN OPAGER
        I have to agree with Shotgun on this one. The surrender of Vicksburg and the subsequent loss of control of the Mississippi River effectively ended any hopes of
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 7, 2000
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          I have to agree with Shotgun on this one. The surrender of Vicksburg and the subsequent loss of control of the Mississippi River effectively ended any hopes of Southern victory, no matter what the ANV accomplished in the Eastern campaign.
          Regards to the Troops,
          JohnO






          Luvankizzez, JohnO
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        • JOHN OPAGER
          I have to agree with Shotgun on this one. The surrender of Vicksburg and the subsequent loss of control of the Mississippi River effectively ended any hopes of
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 7, 2000
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            I have to agree with Shotgun on this one. The surrender of Vicksburg and the subsequent loss of control of the Mississippi River effectively ended any hopes of Southern victory, no matter what the ANV accomplished in the Eastern campaign.
            Regards to the Troops,
            JohnO






            Luvankizzez, JohnO
            Sign up for a free About.com Email account at http://About.com

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