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[civilwarwest] Whitworth Rifles

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  • Hugh Martyr
    I will do some research on the Manufacturer of the Whitworth Armaments. My first belief is that they were most likely in Birmingham where most British guns
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 18, 2000
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      I will do some research on the Manufacturer of the Whitworth Armaments. My first belief is that they were most likely in Birmingham where most British guns were made up to WW II. If not I'll still find out something there as the Government proof office is there, where all British made weapons have to be tested and receive a proof mark. I will get back to you in due course.
      Hugh
    • Hugh Martyr
      I will do some research on the Manufacturer of the Whitworth Armaments. My first belief is that they were most likely in Birmingham where most British guns
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 18, 2000
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        I will do some research on the Manufacturer of the Whitworth Armaments. My first belief is that they were most likely in Birmingham where most British guns were made up to WW II. If not I'll still find out something there as the Government proof office is there, where all British made weapons have to be tested and receive a proof mark. I will get back to you in due course.
        Hugh
      • Hugh Martyr
        On 18th Jan I promised to do some research on the Whitworth Rifles which was used in the War. It has taken time..I apologise. In 1853 the British Government
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 22, 2000
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          On 18th Jan I promised to do some research on the Whitworth Rifles which was used in the War. It has taken time..I apologise.
              In 1853 the British Government asked Sir Joseph Whitworth who was a leading engineer that had invented new measuring equipment, for advice on improving the accuracy of the standard Enfield Rifle. He was required to keep the same bullet weight and charge, that was a 530 grain bullet charged with 70 grains of powder. He first altered the shape of the bullet; from.568in (14.4mm) before expansion, to .45in (11.43mm) and the length from .875in (22..2mm) to 1.375 in ( 34.7mm). The Whitworth barrel had a much improved rifling making a turn in 20 in with a hexagonal cross-section with rounded corners. The weapon was three times as accurate as the standard issue Enfield with open sights. With telescopic sighting was the first real snipers weapon. However dispite winning European shooting competitions it had military setbacks. The powder provided was of generally poor standard and the rifle thus fouled a lot ( due to the hexagonal shape) also due to the high barrel pressure the nipples eroded rapidly and had to be bushed, or lined, with platinum. But it had no rival for accuracy between 1860 -1867.
              His patent was used by British Arms Manufacturers, and used in the making of artillery pieces, however, although highly accurate the breach loading weapons proved to be dangerous in use if substandard ammunition was used. The Royal Navy suspended use of the naval guns due to barrel failures.
              Whitworth Rifles are still used today in competition in England and fetch a large some when and if they get onto the market.
              I believe that someone queried whether or not some General had been shot by a Whitworth. They were sold to both sides and in the right hands would have proved very effective. I don't suppose they noted the caliber of the bullet?
          I remain etc.
          Hugh R Martyr.
        • Hugh Martyr
          On 18th Jan I promised to do some research on the Whitworth Rifles which was used in the War. It has taken time..I apologise. In 1853 the British Government
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 22, 2000
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            On 18th Jan I promised to do some research on the Whitworth Rifles which was used in the War. It has taken time..I apologise.
                In 1853 the British Government asked Sir Joseph Whitworth who was a leading engineer that had invented new measuring equipment, for advice on improving the accuracy of the standard Enfield Rifle. He was required to keep the same bullet weight and charge, that was a 530 grain bullet charged with 70 grains of powder. He first altered the shape of the bullet; from.568in (14.4mm) before expansion, to .45in (11.43mm) and the length from .875in (22..2mm) to 1.375 in ( 34.7mm). The Whitworth barrel had a much improved rifling making a turn in 20 in with a hexagonal cross-section with rounded corners. The weapon was three times as accurate as the standard issue Enfield with open sights. With telescopic sighting was the first real snipers weapon. However dispite winning European shooting competitions it had military setbacks. The powder provided was of generally poor standard and the rifle thus fouled a lot ( due to the hexagonal shape) also due to the high barrel pressure the nipples eroded rapidly and had to be bushed, or lined, with platinum. But it had no rival for accuracy between 1860 -1867.
                His patent was used by British Arms Manufacturers, and used in the making of artillery pieces, however, although highly accurate the breach loading weapons proved to be dangerous in use if substandard ammunition was used. The Royal Navy suspended use of the naval guns due to barrel failures.
                Whitworth Rifles are still used today in competition in England and fetch a large some when and if they get onto the market.
                I believe that someone queried whether or not some General had been shot by a Whitworth. They were sold to both sides and in the right hands would have proved very effective. I don't suppose they noted the caliber of the bullet?
            I remain etc.
            Hugh R Martyr.
          • Hartshje@aol.com
            Hugh, Thank you for your enlightenment on the Whitworth rifle. I found it very interesting, and appreciate your research into the matter. I had originally
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 22, 2000
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              Hugh,

              Thank you for your enlightenment on the Whitworth rifle. I found it very interesting, and appreciate your research into the matter. I had originally asked about the rifle because I had previously only known about the artillery pieces, and did not know of the existence of these special rifles.

              I believe the General in question was John Reynolds, killed at Gettysburg (supposedly by a sharpshooter, but not proven). All accounts I have ever read indicated the fateful bullet was a Minie` ball. I don't know if that was proven fact, or just supposition. Anyway, thanks again.

              Respectfully,
              J. Hartshorn
            • Hartshje@aol.com
              Hugh, Thank you for your enlightenment on the Whitworth rifle. I found it very interesting, and appreciate your research into the matter. I had originally
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 22, 2000
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                Hugh,

                Thank you for your enlightenment on the Whitworth rifle. I found it very interesting, and appreciate your research into the matter. I had originally asked about the rifle because I had previously only known about the artillery pieces, and did not know of the existence of these special rifles.

                I believe the General in question was John Reynolds, killed at Gettysburg (supposedly by a sharpshooter, but not proven). All accounts I have ever read indicated the fateful bullet was a Minie` ball. I don't know if that was proven fact, or just supposition. Anyway, thanks again.

                Respectfully,
                J. Hartshorn
              • CLAYTON BRANNON
                Some think that the General killed by a Whitworth was General Sedgwick at Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. His last words were They can t hit an elephant
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 22, 2000
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                  Some think that the General killed by a Whitworth was General Sedgwick at
                  Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. His last words were "They can't hit an
                  elephant at that distance."


                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: <Hartshje@...>
                  To: <civilwarwest@egroups.com>
                  Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2000 3:47 PM
                  Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Whitworth Rifles


                  > Hugh,
                  >
                  > Thank you for your enlightenment on the Whitworth rifle. I found it very
                  interesting, and appreciate your research into the matter. I had originally
                  asked about the rifle because I had previously only known about the
                  artillery pieces, and did not know of the existence of these special rifles.
                  >
                  > I believe the General in question was John Reynolds, killed at Gettysburg
                  (supposedly by a sharpshooter, but not proven). All accounts I have ever
                  read indicated the fateful bullet was a Minie` ball. I don't know if that
                  was proven fact, or just supposition. Anyway, thanks again.
                  >
                  > Respectfully,
                  > J. Hartshorn
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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                • CLAYTON BRANNON
                  Some think that the General killed by a Whitworth was General Sedgwick at Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. His last words were They can t hit an elephant
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 22, 2000
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                    Some think that the General killed by a Whitworth was General Sedgwick at
                    Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. His last words were "They can't hit an
                    elephant at that distance."


                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: <Hartshje@...>
                    To: <civilwarwest@egroups.com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2000 3:47 PM
                    Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Whitworth Rifles


                    > Hugh,
                    >
                    > Thank you for your enlightenment on the Whitworth rifle. I found it very
                    interesting, and appreciate your research into the matter. I had originally
                    asked about the rifle because I had previously only known about the
                    artillery pieces, and did not know of the existence of these special rifles.
                    >
                    > I believe the General in question was John Reynolds, killed at Gettysburg
                    (supposedly by a sharpshooter, but not proven). All accounts I have ever
                    read indicated the fateful bullet was a Minie` ball. I don't know if that
                    was proven fact, or just supposition. Anyway, thanks again.
                    >
                    > Respectfully,
                    > J. Hartshorn
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    > Get what you deserve with NextCard Visa! Rates as low as 2.9%
                    > Intro or 9.9% Fixed APR, online balance transfers, Rewards Points,
                    > no hidden fees, and much more! Get NextCard today and get the
                    > credit youdeserve! Apply now! Get your NextCard Visa at:
                    > http://click.egroups.com/1/912/1/_/14182/_/951256071/
                    >
                    > -- Talk to your group with your own voice!
                    > -- http://www.egroups.com/VoiceChatPage?listName=civilwarwest&m=1
                    >
                    >
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