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Re: Tennessee River

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  • hank9174
    Muscle Shoals is the fall line in northern Alabama and the rapids are impassable. That was as far as river travel could go in the 1860s. The shoals separate
    Message 1 of 20 , Aug 29, 2013
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      Muscle Shoals is the fall line in northern Alabama and the rapids are impassable. That was as far as river travel could go in the 1860s.

      The shoals separate the river into the upper and lower Tennessee and the river drops some 140 feet over 40 miles.

      Direct navigation wasn't finally acheived until the TVA in the 1930s...


      HankC

      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, SDE80@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > Sorry, my reply was not clear enough. Your third question was why didn't Rosecrans use the river to resupply Chattanooga, the answer was the CS interdicted it. There were guns on Lookout, and pickets and I think a few field pieces along the banks, at least before the end of October. After the end of October, the RR was open from Nashville.
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: John Lawrence <jlawrence@...>
      > To: civilwarwest <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Mon, Aug 19, 2013 1:43 pm
      > Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Tennessee River
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Thank you.
      > Where do I find the story on the interdicted boat?
      >
      > I might take that tour.
      >
      > Regards,
      > Jack
      >
      > SDE80@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > 1) The Tennessee River does not run from Nashville to Chattanooga. The Tennessee starts above Knoxville, runs southwestwardly toward Chattanooga, moves into Alabama west of Chattanooga, flows across N. Alabama to very corner of N. Mississippi, and then back into Tennessee near Pittsburg Landing, eventually flowing into Kentucky and the Ohio River.
      >
      > 2) A boat from Nashville to Chattanooga would have to go down the Cumberland to the Ohio and then ascend the Tennessee and go thru N. Alabama to Chattanooga.
      >
      > 3) Confederates interdicted it.
      >
      > Sam Elliott
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: John Lawrence <jlawrence@...>
      > To: civilwarwest <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Mon, Aug 19, 2013 11:26 am
      > Subject: [civilwarwest] Tennessee River
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hello.
      > The Tennessee river is navigable from Nashville to Chattanooga.
      > At least there are river boat tours today.
      > Why was it not used by Rosecreans to resupply Chattanooga?
      > Regards,
      > Jack Lawrence
      >
    • John Lawrence
      I appreciate the answer. Understand Rosecreans dilemma. Thanks, Regards, Jack Every field has a local who understands the ground. A lesson I learned at
      Message 2 of 20 , Aug 29, 2013
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        I appreciate the answer.

        Understand Rosecreans dilemma.

        Thanks,
        Regards,
        Jack

        Every field has a local who understands the ground. A lesson I learned at Pottawattamie Creek.

        hank9174 <clarkc@...> wrote:

        >Muscle Shoals is the fall line in northern Alabama and the rapids are impassable. That was as far as river travel could go in the 1860s.
        >
        >The shoals separate the river into the upper and lower Tennessee and the river drops some 140 feet over 40 miles.
        >
        >Direct navigation wasn't finally acheived until the TVA in the 1930s...
        >
        >
        >HankC
        >
        >--- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, SDE80@... wrote:
        >>
        >>
        >> Sorry, my reply was not clear enough. Your third question was why didn't Rosecrans use the river to resupply Chattanooga, the answer was the CS interdicted it. There were guns on Lookout, and pickets and I think a few field pieces along the banks, at least before the end of October. After the end of October, the RR was open from Nashville.
        >>
        >>
        >> -----Original Message-----
        >> From: John Lawrence <jlawrence@...>
        >> To: civilwarwest <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
        >> Sent: Mon, Aug 19, 2013 1:43 pm
        >> Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Tennessee River
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Thank you.
        >> Where do I find the story on the interdicted boat?
        >>
        >> I might take that tour.
        >>
        >> Regards,
        >> Jack
        >>
        >> SDE80@... wrote:
        >>
        >>
        >> 1) The Tennessee River does not run from Nashville to Chattanooga. The Tennessee starts above Knoxville, runs southwestwardly toward Chattanooga, moves into Alabama west of Chattanooga, flows across N. Alabama to very corner of N. Mississippi, and then back into Tennessee near Pittsburg Landing, eventually flowing into Kentucky and the Ohio River.
        >>
        >> 2) A boat from Nashville to Chattanooga would have to go down the Cumberland to the Ohio and then ascend the Tennessee and go thru N. Alabama to Chattanooga.
        >>
        >> 3) Confederates interdicted it.
        >>
        >> Sam Elliott
        >>
        >>
        >> -----Original Message-----
        >> From: John Lawrence <jlawrence@...>
        >> To: civilwarwest <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
        >> Sent: Mon, Aug 19, 2013 11:26 am
        >> Subject: [civilwarwest] Tennessee River
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> Hello.
        >> The Tennessee river is navigable from Nashville to Chattanooga.
        >> At least there are river boat tours today.
        >> Why was it not used by Rosecreans to resupply Chattanooga?
        >> Regards,
        >> Jack Lawrence
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
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