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Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors

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  • Dave Gorski
    My GGGrandfather, Pvt. Jefferson Thompson, was a driver who served with the 3rd section of the 11th Indiana Battery. While the battery was moving to Pittsburg
    Message 1 of 27 , Mar 6, 2013
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      My GGGrandfather, Pvt. Jefferson Thompson, was a driver who served with the 3rd section of the 11th Indiana Battery. While the battery was moving to Pittsburg Landing with Buell's Army, he was run over by an ammunition wagon and went back to Nashville with broken bones. While in the hospital there he contracted Typhoid. He survived and rejoined the unit just before they moved to Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The 11th Indiana Artillery was with General Lytle at the battle of Chickamauga where Jefferson took what must have been a spent round ball to the head. It pierced his scalp and travelled under the skin stopping at his forehead. (The family tradition points to him as the source of our hard headedness) He was treated at the ammunition trains refusing to go to the hospital (probably remembering his last hospital stay) where the wound was treated but the ball remained under the skin. Many years later his grandkids would talk about how they would rub Grandpa's forehead for good luck. Thompson and the 11th Battery were active during the Atlanta Campaign and during the siege of Atlanta the battery fired 3,010 rounds from their 4.5 inch siege guns over the course of 12 days and nights. Jefferson mustered out with the 11th Battery, went to Wisconsin, went back to farming and married his sweetheart from Indiana on the 4th of July in 1865.

      In doing research over many years, I found his story and that of the battery so interesting that i've written a battery history (as yet unpublished). A few years ago I had the real pleasure of meeting with other descendants of 11th Battery men and spending a few days re-tracing their steps and re-telling their stories. I couldn't help but think that those citizen soldiers would have been surprised, and pleased, at knowing that their descendants so honored them. I highly recommend researching any potential Civil War ancestor, or even "adopt" one from a cemetery and research him. Very rewarding, and you will meet some great people.

      Regards, Dave Gorski
    • lilsteve68
      This is a Civil Wsr Story of about my 2nd Great Grand Uncle John William Craft. The Story has been passed down over the years. Hope you all enjoy it.
      Message 2 of 27 , Mar 6, 2013
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        This is a Civil Wsr Story of about my 2nd Great Grand Uncle John William Craft. The Story has been passed down over the years. Hope you all enjoy it.

        Regards,
        Steven

        ------------------------------------------------------------

        John William Craft

        (1849-1880)


        During the Civil War - John was in the Home Guard near Randolph County, Alabama. During the last few months of the war a small band of Union Soldiers came in to Randolph County and took John and another boy in the home guard as prisoners.

        The soldiers took them down to the Tallapoosa River and tied them to a tree. The next mourning, one of the soldiers came to them and told them that the other soldiers were going to turn them loose and if the could swim across the river they would let them go free.

        The soldier warned them that the other soldiers were going to start shooting at them as soon as they got in the water. He told them that as soon as they jumped in to go under the water and swim downstream as far as they could before the came out.

        When the soldiers untied them, they jumped in the water and went under and started swimming down stream. The soldiers started shooting into the water where the boys had! gone under, thinking that they would try to swim across the river.

        John and his companion came out of the water down stream, out of sight of the Union Soldiers and by staying in the woods they were able to escape.

      • dave0718@att.net
        I have been able to follow two of my and my wife s civil war ancestors at the Chickamauga Study Group. At the March 2012 two day meeting, on the second day in
        Message 3 of 27 , Mar 8, 2013
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          I have been able to follow two of my and my wife's civil war ancestors at the Chickamauga Study Group. At the March 2012 two day meeting, on the second day in the morning, we marched where her great-grandfather of the first Texans marched in the morning of the second day of the battle toward the rise going to Snodgrass hill. (He later walked home from Appomattox.) In the afternoon of the second day of the meeting we marched up the rise to Snodgrass hill which my great-grandfather traversed on the afternoon of the second day of the battle to join Thomas until the end of the battle. I don't know if he rode a horse or limped up the rise. In a letter home right after the battle he told his family that, for the second time this year, his horse fell on his right leg. (We still have 50 of his letters home from the Civil War.) He was allowed to resign late in October that year since he could no longer march or get on a horse without help. He did live on to 1897. His eulogy can be found at http://suvcw.org/past/wgkendrick.htm. Dave



          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Dick Weeks" <shotgun@...> wrote:
          >
          > First, I would like to introduce myself. Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate. My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun. I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have.
          >
          > I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try to start a thread. The reason I am doing this is self serving. I want to put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors, Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me with that. Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family back as far as I have. I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the American Revolution. However I am sure there are many of you that have stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War. I would like to share those stories with visitors to my website (civilwarhome.com). Since I made it, I know the rule is this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors. You may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle they were engaged in but was passed on to your family. It doesn't have to battle related as long as it is Civil War related. I have ancestors that served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories were not always talking about a battle. If this thread works I will share their stories with the group.
          >
          > The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I found amusing in my family's history. My great great grandmother was Mary Mathews Byers. She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her home in full Confederate uniform. He said when leaving, "If it is a boy, name him for me." She answered she would do so even it were a girl. And she did. My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks. The family always called her "Charlie."
          >
          > I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
          > Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
          > http://www.civilwarhome.com
          >
        • Dave
          I have been able to follow two of my and my wife s civil war ancestors at the Chickamauga Study Group. At the March 2012 two day meeting, on the second day in
          Message 4 of 27 , Mar 8, 2013
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            I have been able to follow two of my and my wife’s civil war ancestors at the Chickamauga Study Group. At the March 2012 two day meeting, on the second day in the morning, we marched where her great-grandfather of the first Texans marched in the morning of the second day of the battle toward the rise going to Snodgrass hill. (He later walked home from Appomattox.) In the afternoon of the second day of the meeting we marched up the rise to Snodgrass hill which my great-grandfather traversed on the afternoon of the second day of the battle to join Thomas until the end of the battle. I don’t know if he rode a horse or limped up the rise. In a letter home right after the battle he told his family that, for the second time this year, his horse fell on his right leg. (We still have 50 of his letters home from the Civil War.) He was allowed to resign late in October that year since he could no longer march or get on a horse without help. He did live on to 1897. His eulogy can be found at http://suvcw.org/past/wgkendrick.htm . Dave

             

             

          • Tom Gilbert
            Hello Dick and all: Dick, first I would like to thank you once again for publishing two of my articles online a few years ago .. I still refer to them often.
            Message 5 of 27 , Mar 9, 2013
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              Hello Dick and all:
              Dick, first I would like to thank you once again for publishing two of my articles online a few years ago .. I still refer to them often.  

              I always hoped that I had relatives on both sides, and over the years I found to my great satisfaction that I did.   On my mother's side, I had several relatives in the 78th Pennsylvania,  probably all cousins .. the surname was "Jack" .. one of the Jack boys was listed as a "musician", which further delighted me as I play a little music, too.  The 78th was in the Western Theater, most notably serving at Stones River.   My maternal grandmother was a Jack, married a Gano. They moved west, and my mother came along in Deming, New Mexico in 1913

              My branch of Gano's had a distant cousin in another branch, Richard Montgomery Gano, a Kentucky-born Confederate cavalry officer who served as a captain, then a colonel under John Hunt Morgan during the invasion of Kentucky in 1862, under Nathan Bedford Forrest at Chickamauga, and later as a brigadier general in command of Texas cavalry.  His grandfather was also a general in the War of 1812, and his great-grandfather, Rev. John Gano, was known as the "fighting chaplain" in the Revolutionary War, and was said to have baptized George Washington in the Potomac.  The Confederate general also had a rather famous great-great grandson, Howard Robard Hughes.

              On my father's side was my great-great-great (I think I have the number of "greats" right) grandfather Mills who was, as an Arkansas private, seriously wounded at Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge). The story goes that my g-g-g-grandmother drove the family buckboard up from southwestern Arkansas and took him home where he recovered, and his g-g-grandson, my dad, was born there in 1908.  During the Depression, he headed west and met my mom in El Paso, where I was eventually born in 1947.

              Since both sides of my family were here during the Civil War, there are no doubt more that I don't know of.   Interesting stuff!!

              Thanks for the opportunity to share this.

              Tom Gilbert

              From: Dick Weeks <shotgun@...>
              To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 11:28 PM
              Subject: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors

               
              First, I would like to introduce myself.  Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate.  My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun.  I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have. 
               
              I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try to start a thread.  The reason I am doing this is self serving.  I want to put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors, Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me with that.  Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family back as far as I have.  I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the American Revolution.  However I am sure there are many of you that have stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War.  I would like to share those stories with visitors to my website (civilwarhome.com).  Since I made it, I know the rule is this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors.  You may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle they were engaged in but was passed on to your family.  It doesn't have to battle related as long as it is Civil War related.  I have ancestors that served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories were not always talking about a battle.  If this thread works I will share their stories with the group.
               
              The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I found amusing in my family's history.  My great great grandmother was Mary Mathews Byers.  She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her home in full Confederate uniform.  He said when leaving, "If it is a boy, name him for me."  She answered she would do so even it were a girl.  And she did.  My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks.  The family always called her "Charlie."
               
              I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
              Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
              http://www.civilwarhome.com


            • Charles R.
              My great-grandfather, Martin L. McComas was also in the 78th PA. Infantry- Co. D as a private & a corporal, but doesn t show up in the regimental history &
              Message 6 of 27 , Mar 9, 2013
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                My great-grandfather, Martin L. McComas was also in the 78th PA. Infantry- Co. "D" as a private & a corporal,
                but doesn't show up in the regimental history & rosters therein!
                He later joined a 100 days regiment- the 194th PA. Infantry, Co. "E."
                Most of these facts came from great-grandma's pension applications, & Civil War Soldiers & Sailors Database.
                If anyone could point me in a better direction, I'd be most appreciative!
                 
                Charles
                From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2013 10:13 PM
                Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                 
                Hello Dick and all:
                Dick, first I would like to thank you once again for publishing two of my articles online a few years ago .. I still refer to them often.  

                I always hoped that I had relatives on both sides, and over the years I found to my great satisfaction that I did.   On my mother's side, I had several relatives in the 78th Pennsylvania,  probably all cousins .. the surname was "Jack" .. one of the Jack boys was listed as a "musician", which further delighted me as I play a little music, too.  The 78th was in the Western Theater, most notably serving at Stones River.   My maternal grandmother was a Jack, married a Gano. They moved west, and my mother came along in Deming, New Mexico in 1913

                My branch of Gano's had a distant cousin in another branch, Richard Montgomery Gano, a Kentucky-born Confederate cavalry officer who served as a captain, then a colonel under John Hunt Morgan during the invasion of Kentucky in 1862, under Nathan Bedford Forrest at Chickamauga, and later as a brigadier general in command of Texas cavalry.  His grandfather was also a general in the War of 1812, and his great-grandfather, Rev. John Gano, was known as the "fighting chaplain" in the Revolutionary War, and was said to have baptized George Washington in the Potomac.  The Confederate general also had a rather famous great-great grandson, Howard Robard Hughes.

                On my father's side was my great-great-great (I think I have the number of "greats" right) grandfather Mills who was, as an Arkansas private, seriously wounded at Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge). The story goes that my g-g-g-grandmother drove the family buckboard up from southwestern Arkansas and took him home where he recovered, and his g-g-grandson, my dad, was born there in 1908.  During the Depression, he headed west and met my mom in El Paso, where I was eventually born in 1947.

                Since both sides of my family were here during the Civil War, there are no doubt more that I don't know of.   Interesting stuff!!

                Thanks for the opportunity to share this.

                Tom Gilbert
                From: Dick Weeks <shotgun@...>
                To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 11:28 PM
                Subject: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                 
                First, I would like to introduce myself.  Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate.  My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun.  I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have. 
                 
                I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try to start a thread.  The reason I am doing this is self serving.  I want to put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors, Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me with that.  Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family back as far as I have.  I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the American Revolution.  However I am sure there are many of you that have stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War.  I would like to share those stories with visitors to my website (civilwarhome.com).  Since I made it, I know the rule is this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors.  You may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle they were engaged in but was passed on to your family.  It doesn't have to battle related as long as it is Civil War related.  I have ancestors that served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories were not always talking about a battle.  If this thread works I will share their stories with the group.
                 
                The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I found amusing in my family's history.  My great great grandmother was Mary Mathews Byers.  She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her home in full Confederate uniform.  He said when leaving, "If it is a boy, name him for me."  She answered she would do so even it were a girl.  And she did.  My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks.  The family always called her "Charlie."
                 
                I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                http://www.civilwarhome.com
              • Tom Gilbert
                Charles, you probably have the same regimental history as I do (The Gallant Seventy-Eighth by Ron Gancas), but just in case I looked at the roster withion ..
                Message 7 of 27 , Mar 10, 2013
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                  Charles, you probably have the same regimental history as I do (The Gallant Seventy-Eighth by Ron Gancas), but just in case I looked at the roster withion .. lots of guys with the "Mc" suffix, but no McComas .. I imagine their were lots of men that for whatever reason were not included on the roster (I also looked for possible misspellings, but no luck).. record keeping was likely less accurate then too .. you have some good sources there .. best wishes with your continued research . tom g


                  From: Charles R. <na_jeb@...>
                  To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 1:48 AM
                  Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors

                   
                  My great-grandfather, Martin L. McComas was also in the 78th PA. Infantry- Co. "D" as a private & a corporal,
                  but doesn't show up in the regimental history & rosters therein!
                  He later joined a 100 days regiment- the 194th PA. Infantry, Co. "E."
                  Most of these facts came from great-grandma's pension applications, & Civil War Soldiers & Sailors Database.
                  If anyone could point me in a better direction, I'd be most appreciative!
                   
                  Charles
                  From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                  To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2013 10:13 PM
                  Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                   
                  Hello Dick and all:
                  Dick, first I would like to thank you once again for publishing two of my articles online a few years ago .. I still refer to them often.  

                  I always hoped that I had relatives on both sides, and over the years I found to my great satisfaction that I did.   On my mother's side, I had several relatives in the 78th Pennsylvania,  probably all cousins .. the surname was "Jack" .. one of the Jack boys was listed as a "musician", which further delighted me as I play a little music, too.  The 78th was in the Western Theater, most notably serving at Stones River.   My maternal grandmother was a Jack, married a Gano. They moved west, and my mother came along in Deming, New Mexico in 1913

                  My branch of Gano's had a distant cousin in another branch, Richard Montgomery Gano, a Kentucky-born Confederate cavalry officer who served as a captain, then a colonel under John Hunt Morgan during the invasion of Kentucky in 1862, under Nathan Bedford Forrest at Chickamauga, and later as a brigadier general in command of Texas cavalry.  His grandfather was also a general in the War of 1812, and his great-grandfather, Rev. John Gano, was known as the "fighting chaplain" in the Revolutionary War, and was said to have baptized George Washington in the Potomac.  The Confederate general also had a rather famous great-great grandson, Howard Robard Hughes.

                  On my father's side was my great-great-great (I think I have the number of "greats" right) grandfather Mills who was, as an Arkansas private, seriously wounded at Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge). The story goes that my g-g-g-grandmother drove the family buckboard up from southwestern Arkansas and took him home where he recovered, and his g-g-grandson, my dad, was born there in 1908.  During the Depression, he headed west and met my mom in El Paso, where I was eventually born in 1947.

                  Since both sides of my family were here during the Civil War, there are no doubt more that I don't know of.   Interesting stuff!!

                  Thanks for the opportunity to share this.

                  Tom Gilbert
                  From: Dick Weeks <shotgun@...>
                  To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 11:28 PM
                  Subject: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                   
                  First, I would like to introduce myself.  Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate.  My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun.  I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have. 
                   
                  I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try to start a thread.  The reason I am doing this is self serving.  I want to put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors, Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me with that.  Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family back as far as I have.  I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the American Revolution.  However I am sure there are many of you that have stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War.  I would like to share those stories with visitors to my website (civilwarhome.com).  Since I made it, I know the rule is this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors.  You may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle they were engaged in but was passed on to your family.  It doesn't have to battle related as long as it is Civil War related.  I have ancestors that served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories were not always talking about a battle.  If this thread works I will share their stories with the group.
                   
                  The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I found amusing in my family's history.  My great great grandmother was Mary Mathews Byers.  She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her home in full Confederate uniform.  He said when leaving, "If it is a boy, name him for me."  She answered she would do so even it were a girl.  And she did.  My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks.  The family always called her "Charlie."
                   
                  I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                  Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                  http://www.civilwarhome.com


                • lilsteve68
                  Dick, I have a long list of Civil Ancestors. The story I posted a few days ago is the only story I know story wise , but have Names, Regiments, company info
                  Message 8 of 27 , Mar 10, 2013
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                    Dick,
                     
                    I have a long list of Civil Ancestors. The story I posted a few days ago is the only story I know story wise , but have Names, Regiments, company info on Confederate & Federal alike in all about 70 most are distant relatives  but  do have 3rd great grandfather, Uncle and other  cousins as well let me know what your looking for, regards,  Steven Cone
                     
                    BTW
                    I had a relative  in the 28th Alabama  & the 41st Ohio Infantry.  I had other relatives face each other in battle through out the war but  these two units are different.  At the Battle of Orchard knob Nov. 23 1863 the 41st captured the colors of the 28th.
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     

                    Civil War Ancestors
                     
                    First, I would like to introduce myself.  Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate.  My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun.  I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have. 
                     
                    I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try to start a thread.  The reason I am doing this is self serving.  I want to put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors, Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me with that.  Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family back as far as I have.  I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the American Revolution.  However I am sure there are many of you that have stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War.  I would like to share those stories with visitors to my website (civilwarhome.com).  Since I made it, I know the rule is this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors.  You may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle they were engaged in but was passed on to your family.  It doesn't have to battle related as long as it is Civil War related.  I have ancestors that served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories were not always talking about a battle.  If this thread works I will share their stories with the group.
                     
                    The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I found amusing in my family's history.  My great great grandmother was Mary Mathews Byers.  She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her home in full Confederate uniform.  He said when leaving, "If it is a boy, name him for me."  She answered she would do so even it were a girl.  And she did.  My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks.  The family always called her "Charlie."
                     
                    I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                    Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                    http://www.civilwarhome.com

                  • scopx.rm
                    Dick: My situation is a little different than some here. My family was very closed mouthed about those in civil war with only few remarks, with few specifics.
                    Message 9 of 27 , Mar 10, 2013
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                      Dick: My situation is a little different than some here. My family was very closed mouthed about those in civil war with only few remarks, with few specifics. One story I recall where relative was hung (surmise a civilian) for not providing opposing desired information. As he was dangling, friendlies came up and chased off the hanging party. He survived, but was required to wear leather collar rest of life.
                      2nd story. I did not know (see above) my GGF was involved in civil war until found his grave marker which showed his rank of LT. I know(family told me) he had died in NM while homesteading with my GF. Backtracking, did find his group, Mich. 4th (Minty's)Cavalry involved in more than 80 skirmishes.
                      Another involves fellow that smoked lots of cigars, and supposedly drank a lot of whiskey. And the maiden name of my GM the same. However, as family quiet on issue, and unable to trace this line, surmise it to be rumor. To the ancestors, it was too bloody, and did not want to talk about it.
                      Tom

                      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, lilsteve68@... wrote:
                      >
                      > Dick,
                      >
                      > I have a long list of Civil Ancestors. The story I posted a few days ago
                      > is the only story I know story wise , but have Names, Regiments, company
                      > info on Confederate & Federal alike in all about 70 most are distant relatives
                      > but do have 3rd great grandfather, Uncle and other cousins as well let
                      > me know what your looking for, regards, Steven Cone
                      >
                      > BTW
                      > I had a relative in the 28th Alabama & the 41st Ohio Infantry. I had
                      > other relatives face each other in battle through out the war but these two
                      > units are different. At the Battle of Orchard knob Nov. 23 1863 the 41st
                      > captured the colors of the 28th.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Civil War Ancestors
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > <WBR
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > First, I would like to introduce myself. Some of you may recognize me
                      > while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate. My name is
                      > Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun. I started this group
                      > some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I
                      > have.
                      >
                      > I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try
                      > to start a thread. The reason I am doing this is self serving. I want to
                      > put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors,
                      > Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me
                      > with that. Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family
                      > back as far as I have. I am a member of the Sons of the American
                      > Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the
                      > American Revolution. However I am sure there are many of you that have
                      > stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War. I
                      > would like to share those stories with visitors to my website
                      > (_civilwarhome.com_ (http://civilwarhome.com/) ). Since I made it, I know the rule is
                      > this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this
                      > case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors. You
                      > may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle
                      > they were engaged in but was passed on to your family. It doesn't have to
                      > battle related as long as it is Civil War related. I have ancestors that
                      > served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories
                      > were not always talking about a battle. If this thread works I will share
                      > their stories with the group.
                      >
                      > The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I
                      > found amusing in my family's history. My great great grandmother was Mary
                      > Mathews Byers. She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her
                      > home in full Confederate uniform. He said when leaving, "If it is a boy,
                      > name him for me." She answered she would do so even it were a girl. And
                      > she did. My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks. The
                      > family always called her "Charlie."
                      >
                      > I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                      > Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                      > http://www.civilwarhome.com
                      >
                    • edkiniry
                      My grandfather had been wounded at Shiloh and, after the battle, was sent north to Cairo for treatment. after about six weeks he thought he was well enough to
                      Message 10 of 27 , Mar 10, 2013
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                        My grandfather had been wounded at Shiloh and, after the battle, was sent north to Cairo for treatment. after about six weeks he thought he was well enough to return to his battery but the doctors would not release him. he found a battery mate in the same predicument. They found two soldiers who were scheduled for release but did not want to
                        go back. they swaped identities and left.
                        when they approached the Union Lines they were caught and taken before
                        General Grant. After Edward explained the situation Grant said "these are good ol boys, take them to their unit, but see that they get there.

                        Dick, thank you for what you have accomplished. Your site was a source for some of the information in my book "Always In The Middle Of the Battle".

                        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Dick Weeks" <shotgun@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > First, I would like to introduce myself. Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate. My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun. I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have.
                        >

                        >
                        > I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                        > Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                        > http://www.civilwarhome.com
                        >
                      • Tom Gilbert
                        I found that to be very frustrating during my family research (which I was doing for an undergraduate course in ethnology and immigation at U of Pittsburgh in
                        Message 11 of 27 , Mar 10, 2013
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                          I found that to be very frustrating during my family research (which I was doing for an undergraduate course in ethnology and immigation at U of Pittsburgh in 1980) .. I still had several elders around especially on my father's side that knew a lot of family history, but they were unwilling to share it with me or anyone else .. one elderly aunt said "you might not like what you find out", which of course intrigued me all the more .. my mother was a little more open, and at least gave me a few clues .. most of my information eventually came from "outsiders", helpful genealogists, historians, and some very distant cousins .. but I'm sure a lot of very neat stuff died with the older generation (which is gone now) and they didn't leave a paper trail that I have been able to find .. I was at one time thinking about learning more about genealogy to supplement my life-long interest in the Civil War era.  I did find that just about all the branches of my family tree were here then (one branch, the American Gano family which I mentioned earlier, traced back to 1653 when the patriarch came over from France).    
                          .. tom g ..


                          From: scopx.rm <scopx@...>
                          To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 7:50 PM
                          Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Civil War Ancestors

                           
                          Dick: My situation is a little different than some here. My family was very closed mouthed about those in civil war with only few remarks, with few specifics. One story I recall where relative was hung (surmise a civilian) for not providing opposing desired information. As he was dangling, friendlies came up and chased off the hanging party. He survived, but was required to wear leather collar rest of life.
                          2nd story. I did not know (see above) my GGF was involved in civil war until found his grave marker which showed his rank of LT. I know(family told me) he had died in NM while homesteading with my GF. Backtracking, did find his group, Mich. 4th (Minty's)Cavalry involved in more than 80 skirmishes.
                          Another involves fellow that smoked lots of cigars, and supposedly drank a lot of whiskey. And the maiden name of my GM the same. However, as family quiet on issue, and unable to trace this line, surmise it to be rumor. To the ancestors, it was too bloody, and did not want to talk about it.
                          Tom

                          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, lilsteve68@... wrote:
                          >
                          > Dick,
                          >
                          > I have a long list of Civil Ancestors. The story I posted a few days ago
                          > is the only story I know story wise , but have Names, Regiments, company
                          > info on Confederate & Federal alike in all about 70 most are distant relatives
                          > but do have 3rd great grandfather, Uncle and other cousins as well let
                          > me know what your looking for, regards, Steven Cone
                          >
                          > BTW
                          > I had a relative in the 28th Alabama & the 41st Ohio Infantry. I had
                          > other relatives face each other in battle through out the war but these two
                          > units are different. At the Battle of Orchard knob Nov. 23 1863 the 41st
                          > captured the colors of the 28th.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Civil War Ancestors
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > <WBR
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > First, I would like to introduce myself. Some of you may recognize me
                          > while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate. My name is
                          > Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun. I started this group
                          > some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I
                          > have.
                          >
                          > I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try
                          > to start a thread. The reason I am doing this is self serving. I want to
                          > put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors,
                          > Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me
                          > with that. Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family
                          > back as far as I have. I am a member of the Sons of the American
                          > Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the
                          > American Revolution. However I am sure there are many of you that have
                          > stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War. I
                          > would like to share those stories with visitors to my website
                          > (_civilwarhome.com_ (http://civilwarhome.com/) ). Since I made it, I know the rule is
                          > this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this
                          > case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors. You
                          > may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle
                          > they were engaged in but was passed on to your family. It doesn't have to
                          > battle related as long as it is Civil War related. I have ancestors that
                          > served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories
                          > were not always talking about a battle. If this thread works I will share
                          > their stories with the group.
                          >
                          > The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I
                          > found amusing in my family's history. My great great grandmother was Mary
                          > Mathews Byers. She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her
                          > home in full Confederate uniform. He said when leaving, "If it is a boy,
                          > name him for me." She answered she would do so even it were a girl. And
                          > she did. My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks. The
                          > family always called her "Charlie."
                          >
                          > I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                          > Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                          > http://www.civilwarhome.com
                          >



                        • Ned Baldwin
                          For most of my ancestors I only know the basics -- unit, dates of service -- but no stories. But I have one ancestor who made more of a mark on history. Isaac
                          Message 12 of 27 , Mar 10, 2013
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                            For most of my ancestors I only know the basics -- unit, dates of service -- but no stories. But I have one ancestor who made more of a mark on history.

                            Isaac Harris was born in Brooklyn. His father, also Isaac Harris, was a Welsh ship captain who came to Brooklyn in the early 1800s; Isaac's mother was a Schenck, a dutch family that settled in Brooklyn in the 1650s. In 1861 the young Isaac was a student at Antioch College in Ohio. We dont have a clear picture of the details but we know he left school to go to war and by 1863 was called Captain, even though he was no longer in the army.

                            From 1863 through the end of the war he worked for the US Sanitary Commission as Assistant Superintendent, Field Relief Corps, attached to the Army of the Potomac. He followed the army, managing a wagon train of supplies. We have a short diary of his from June - September 1863. While the army was heading to Gettysburg, he was sent to Harrisonburg to check on a supply depot. Even though he didnt belong at the front, he couldnt keep out of it. He tagged along with some militia who rode out toward Carlisle to investigate and had a run in with some Confederate cavalry. Most of the rest of the time he managed wagons, checked on the doctors in the field hospitals, distributed supplies, etc.

                            In December 1862 when the army moved back to Brandy Station, he accompanied the sick. One of the other relief agents wrote "We started for Brandy Station. The roads were in a horrid condition. About eleven o'clock in the evening we stuck, and remained thus until morning. The sick in the ambulances suffered a great deal. The hard tack had given out, and also their beef tea. We issued the crackers from Mr. Kurtz's wagon, and beef tea, rum and milk from mine. Captain Harris, our Assistant Superintendent, made some hot milk punch for them, which many declared did them more good than anything they could have had."
                            [Milk Punch is a mix of brandy, milk, sugar and vanilla. Sounds yummy.]


                            In Feb 1865, he got a nice write up in the NY Times:
                            "It was Capt. HARRIS, for instance, who, during the Summer campaign of 1864, followed up SHERIDAN's eventful movements, with all his wagons and trains, from Brandy Station through Belle Plain, Fredericksburgh, and Port Royal, to the White House. Not only sharing the soldiers' dangers in their almost daily conflicts with the enemy, but ever ready with those aids and comforts for the wounded and dying, which depended on him alone. During the five or six days following the 23d June, and occupied by SHERIDAN in moving from the White House, to this place, it was one continuous skirmish between him and the enemy, in which the trains of the Commission were necessarily much exposed, and received some damage. When at Windmill Point -- some twenty miles distant from City Point -- Capt. HARRIS, without any escort whatever, and through an enemy's country of which he knew nothing, made a bold dash for this place, and, after many and great labors, arrived safely with his 16 wagons, 81 horses, abundance of invaluable stores for our suffering men, and found thirty men, all as dependent upon his sagacity, nerve and energy, for their lives, as if he were leading them in the field of battle. This gentleman's case only goes to show the amount of hard and even dangerous labor which this institution is constantly requiring of its employees, to carry out practically the noble work they have undertaken, and these are meritorious facts to be kept before the public."


                            After the war he settled in Brooklyn and started a construction firm. He won several contracts for work building Prospect Park [Brooklyn's version of Central Park] in which his connection with Olmsted (the park designer) from the Sanitary Commission may have helped. Later he got a contract with the city to run excursion rides through Prospect Park, a popular activity right after the park opened. Initially this was done with horse drawn wagons. Then in 1900 Isaac had a discussion with a local businessman who made wagons about a new idea: a motor-powered sightseeing bus. The wagon maker, John Mack, had a vision -- to create powerful and durable motor vehicles that would revolutionize the transport industry. He, and his brothers of the Mack Brothers Company, built their first motor vehicle for Isaac and a legend of the US automobile industry was born.
                          • hank9174
                            My mother s side of the family claims 4 confederate soldiers in the army of northern Virginia. Her 4 great-grandfathers (my great-great-grandfathers) are:
                            Message 13 of 27 , Mar 12, 2013
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                              My mother's side of the family claims 4 confederate soldiers in the army of northern Virginia.

                              Her 4 great-grandfathers (my great-great-grandfathers) are:

                              James Strother Johnson was in company C of the 7th Virginia Infantry. Just about all of our information about these men is from the paper trail in the archives in Washington and Richmond. His Virginia pension applications state he lost his eye "in the charge at Gettysburg". The 7th Virginia was in Kemper's brigade of Pickett's division.

                              Burruss Munday was in the Orange Artillery of Carter's Battalion. Their Gettysburg marker is right next to the Eternal Light Peace Memorial. He is listed on the rolls of men surrendered at Appomattox.

                              G.W. Isaacs was in Company K of the 28th Virginia Infantry. This was Garnett's brigade at Gettysburg. Union records list him as a deserter in front of Richmond in November 1864 and taking the oath of allegiance and then sent to Indianapolis as a POW. This was where my Great Aunt Grace, a grand lady, who knew him (her grandfather), chimed in, "He had no clothes. He had no food. He certainly did *not* desert. He surrendered with honor!".

                              Virgil M. St. Clair was in Co. B of the 22nd Battalion Virginia Infantry. This was Brockenbrough's brigade at Gettysburg.

                              The records in the national archives and especially the pension applications, doctor affidavits and requests for paperwork in Richmond are a revealing insight into their lives.


                              Cheers,
                              HankC
                              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Dick Weeks" <shotgun@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > First, I would like to introduce myself. Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate. My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun. I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have.
                              >
                              > I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try to start a thread. The reason I am doing this is self serving. I want to put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors, Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me with that. Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family back as far as I have. I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the American Revolution. However I am sure there are many of you that have stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War. I would like to share those stories with visitors to my website (civilwarhome.com). Since I made it, I know the rule is this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors. You may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle they were engaged in but was passed on to your family. It doesn't have to battle related as long as it is Civil War related. I have ancestors that served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories were not always talking about a battle. If this thread works I will share their stories with the group.
                              >
                              > The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I found amusing in my family's history. My great great grandmother was Mary Mathews Byers. She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her home in full Confederate uniform. He said when leaving, "If it is a boy, name him for me." She answered she would do so even it were a girl. And she did. My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks. The family always called her "Charlie."
                              >
                              > I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                              > Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                              > http://www.civilwarhome.com
                              >
                            • hank9174
                              ... The story is told that Col. Carter was delayed as his batalion approached a battle. The major in charge, seeing General Lee s party nearby, asked for
                              Message 14 of 27 , Mar 14, 2013
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                                >
                                > Burruss Munday was in the Orange Artillery of Carter's Battalion. Their Gettysburg marker is right next to the Eternal Light Peace Memorial. He is listed on the rolls of men surrendered at Appomattox.
                                >

                                The story is told that Col. Carter was delayed as his batalion approached a battle.

                                The major in charge, seeing General Lee's party nearby, asked for instructions, to which Lee himself suggested deploying along a nearby ridge.

                                Carter caught up, surveyed the position and exclaimed, "This is a terrible position. What idiot placed these guns?".

                                While the staffs looked on in barely suppressed amusement, Lee repled, "Ah, Col. Carter I am glad you are here. Please position your unit as you see fit"...
                              • Dave Spence
                                My gggrand-dad John Crank served with the Big Sandy Bttn, First Capitol Guards (US) and saw action at Satltville. My gg-uncle Tilman Mullins served with the
                                Message 15 of 27 , Mar 14, 2013
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  My gggrand-dad John Crank served with the Big Sandy Bttn, First Capitol Guards (US) and saw action at Satltville. My gg-uncle Tilman Mullins served with the 34th Virginia Cav Bttn., saw action at the Eastern Cavalry field at Gettysburg, a year later was captured and sent off to Camp Chase prison where he died.
                                  Antother ggg grand dad David Ratliff served with the 45th Ky Infantry, died od illness in a military hospital. A couple of Eldridge great uncles served with the 5th Ky Infantry (CSA) and both were wound at Snodgrass Hill at Chickamauga.  My great granmother had a number of nephews who were with the 1st Michigan Artillery.
                                  Dave

                                  From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                                  To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 2:50 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                   
                                  Charles, you probably have the same regimental history as I do (The Gallant Seventy-Eighth by Ron Gancas), but just in case I looked at the roster withion .. lots of guys with the "Mc" suffix, but no McComas .. I imagine their were lots of men that for whatever reason were not included on the roster (I also looked for possible misspellings, but no luck).. record keeping was likely less accurate then too .. you have some good sources there .. best wishes with your continued research . tom g

                                  From: Charles R. <na_jeb@...>
                                  To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 1:48 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                   
                                  My great-grandfather, Martin L. McComas was also in the 78th PA. Infantry- Co. "D" as a private & a corporal,
                                  but doesn't show up in the regimental history & rosters therein!
                                  He later joined a 100 days regiment- the 194th PA. Infantry, Co. "E."
                                  Most of these facts came from great-grandma's pension applications, & Civil War Soldiers & Sailors Database.
                                  If anyone could point me in a better direction, I'd be most appreciative!
                                   
                                  Charles
                                  From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                                  To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2013 10:13 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                   
                                  Hello Dick and all:
                                  Dick, first I would like to thank you once again for publishing two of my articles online a few years ago .. I still refer to them often.  

                                  I always hoped that I had relatives on both sides, and over the years I found to my great satisfaction that I did.   On my mother's side, I had several relatives in the 78th Pennsylvania,  probably all cousins .. the surname was "Jack" .. one of the Jack boys was listed as a "musician", which further delighted me as I play a little music, too.  The 78th was in the Western Theater, most notably serving at Stones River.   My maternal grandmother was a Jack, married a Gano. They moved west, and my mother came along in Deming, New Mexico in 1913

                                  My branch of Gano's had a distant cousin in another branch, Richard Montgomery Gano, a Kentucky-born Confederate cavalry officer who served as a captain, then a colonel under John Hunt Morgan during the invasion of Kentucky in 1862, under Nathan Bedford Forrest at Chickamauga, and later as a brigadier general in command of Texas cavalry.  His grandfather was also a general in the War of 1812, and his great-grandfather, Rev. John Gano, was known as the "fighting chaplain" in the Revolutionary War, and was said to have baptized George Washington in the Potomac.  The Confederate general also had a rather famous great-great grandson, Howard Robard Hughes.

                                  On my father's side was my great-great-great (I think I have the number of "greats" right) grandfather Mills who was, as an Arkansas private, seriously wounded at Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge). The story goes that my g-g-g-grandmother drove the family buckboard up from southwestern Arkansas and took him home where he recovered, and his g-g-grandson, my dad, was born there in 1908.  During the Depression, he headed west and met my mom in El Paso, where I was eventually born in 1947.

                                  Since both sides of my family were here during the Civil War, there are no doubt more that I don't know of.   Interesting stuff!!

                                  Thanks for the opportunity to share this.

                                  Tom Gilbert
                                  From: Dick Weeks <shotgun@...>
                                  To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 11:28 PM
                                  Subject: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                   
                                  First, I would like to introduce myself.  Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate.  My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun.  I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have. 
                                   
                                  I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try to start a thread.  The reason I am doing this is self serving.  I want to put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors, Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me with that.  Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family back as far as I have.  I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the American Revolution.  However I am sure there are many of you that have stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War.  I would like to share those stories with visitors to my website (civilwarhome.com).  Since I made it, I know the rule is this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors.  You may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle they were engaged in but was passed on to your family.  It doesn't have to battle related as long as it is Civil War related.  I have ancestors that served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories were not always talking about a battle.  If this thread works I will share their stories with the group.
                                   
                                  The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I found amusing in my family's history.  My great great grandmother was Mary Mathews Byers.  She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her home in full Confederate uniform.  He said when leaving, "If it is a boy, name him for me."  She answered she would do so even it were a girl.  And she did.  My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks.  The family always called her "Charlie."
                                   
                                  I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                                  Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                                  http://www.civilwarhome.com
                                • David Foote
                                  My relative is Andrew Hull Foote of Ft.Henry and Ft.Donelson fame. When he first was named Cmdr he at once cancelled the daily ration of grog . I am reluctant
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Mar 15, 2013
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                                    My relative is Andrew Hull Foote of Ft.Henry and Ft.Donelson fame. When he first was named Cmdr he at once cancelled the daily ration of "grog". I am reluctant to claim him yet!  To; "Charles" there is a John Gano of Co.F 62nd Illinois buried in Crawford Co. Il. He was born Green County, Ohio
                                    David Foote


                                    To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                    From: spencdc@...
                                    Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2013 14:11:19 -0700
                                    Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors

                                     

                                    My gggrand-dad John Crank served with the Big Sandy Bttn, First Capitol Guards (US) and saw action at Satltville. My gg-uncle Tilman Mullins served with the 34th Virginia Cav Bttn., saw action at the Eastern Cavalry field at Gettysburg, a year later was captured and sent off to Camp Chase prison where he died.
                                    Antother ggg grand dad David Ratliff served with the 45th Ky Infantry, died od illness in a military hospital. A couple of Eldridge great uncles served with the 5th Ky Infantry (CSA) and both were wound at Snodgrass Hill at Chickamauga.  My great granmother had a number of nephews who were with the 1st Michigan Artillery.
                                    Dave

                                    From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                                    To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                    Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 2:50 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                     
                                    Charles, you probably have the same regimental history as I do (The Gallant Seventy-Eighth by Ron Gancas), but just in case I looked at the roster withion .. lots of guys with the "Mc" suffix, but no McComas .. I imagine their were lots of men that for whatever reason were not included on the roster (I also looked for possible misspellings, but no luck).. record keeping was likely less accurate then too .. you have some good sources there .. best wishes with your continued research . tom g

                                    From: Charles R. <na_jeb@...>
                                    To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                    Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 1:48 AM
                                    Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                     
                                    My great-grandfather, Martin L. McComas was also in the 78th PA. Infantry- Co. "D" as a private & a corporal,
                                    but doesn't show up in the regimental history & rosters therein!
                                    He later joined a 100 days regiment- the 194th PA. Infantry, Co. "E."
                                    Most of these facts came from great-grandma's pension applications, & Civil War Soldiers & Sailors Database.
                                    If anyone could point me in a better direction, I'd be most appreciative!
                                     
                                    Charles
                                    From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                                    To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                    Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2013 10:13 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                     
                                    Hello Dick and all:
                                    Dick, first I would like to thank you once again for publishing two of my articles online a few years ago .. I still refer to them often.  

                                    I always hoped that I had relatives on both sides, and over the years I found to my great satisfaction that I did.   On my mother's side, I had several relatives in the 78th Pennsylvania,  probably all cousins .. the surname was "Jack" .. one of the Jack boys was listed as a "musician", which further delighted me as I play a little music, too.  The 78th was in the Western Theater, most notably serving at Stones River.   My maternal grandmother was a Jack, married a Gano. They moved west, and my mother came along in Deming, New Mexico in 1913

                                    My branch of Gano's had a distant cousin in another branch, Richard Montgomery Gano, a Kentucky-born Confederate cavalry officer who served as a captain, then a colonel under John Hunt Morgan during the invasion of Kentucky in 1862, under Nathan Bedford Forrest at Chickamauga, and later as a brigadier general in command of Texas cavalry.  His grandfather was also a general in the War of 1812, and his great-grandfather, Rev. John Gano, was known as the "fighting chaplain" in the Revolutionary War, and was said to have baptized George Washington in the Potomac.  The Confederate general also had a rather famous great-great grandson, Howard Robard Hughes.

                                    On my father's side was my great-great-great (I think I have the number of "greats" right) grandfather Mills who was, as an Arkansas private, seriously wounded at Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge). The story goes that my g-g-g-grandmother drove the family buckboard up from southwestern Arkansas and took him home where he recovered, and his g-g-grandson, my dad, was born there in 1908.  During the Depression, he headed west and met my mom in El Paso, where I was eventually born in 1947.

                                    Since both sides of my family were here during the Civil War, there are no doubt more that I don't know of.   Interesting stuff!!

                                    Thanks for the opportunity to share this.

                                    Tom Gilbert
                                    From: Dick Weeks <shotgun@...>
                                    To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 11:28 PM
                                    Subject: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                     
                                    First, I would like to introduce myself.  Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate.  My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun.  I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have. 
                                     
                                    I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try to start a thread.  The reason I am doing this is self serving.  I want to put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors, Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me with that.  Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family back as far as I have.  I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the American Revolution.  However I am sure there are many of you that have stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War.  I would like to share those stories with visitors to my website (civilwarhome.com).  Since I made it, I know the rule is this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors.  You may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle they were engaged in but was passed on to your family.  It doesn't have to battle related as long as it is Civil War related.  I have ancestors that served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories were not always talking about a battle.  If this thread works I will share their stories with the group.
                                     
                                    The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I found amusing in my family's history.  My great great grandmother was Mary Mathews Byers.  She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her home in full Confederate uniform.  He said when leaving, "If it is a boy, name him for me."  She answered she would do so even it were a girl.  And she did.  My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks.  The family always called her "Charlie."
                                     
                                    I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                                    Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                                    http://www.civilwarhome.com

                                  • Tom Gilbert
                                    David, What relation are you to the Admiral? Are you also related to Shelby?  Or to Henry S. Foote (born in Virginia, pre-war Mississippi Senator/Governor,
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Mar 15, 2013
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      David,
                                      What relation are you to the Admiral? Are you also related to Shelby?  Or to Henry S. Foote (born in Virginia, pre-war Mississippi Senator/Governor, Conf. Rep from Tennessee)? I've often wondered whether Shelby was related to either.. Shelby of course was from Mississippi, while Andrew was from Connecticut, although that doesn't mean anything, as for example my 19th century maternal ancestors were in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, both families moved to Florida where my grandparents married around the turn of the century and soon moved to New Mexico where my mother was born in 1913! ......  John Gano might be a distant relative, I think one of the Gano branches headed out that direction in the early 1800's (when I say branches, and that's probably not correct genealogical terminology, I mean that way back in the late1600's (or maybe it was very early 1700's) one of the close descendants of the immigrant from France had 7 sons, and my genealogist cousin who compiled all this says that the family then started to spread out all over the country .. interesting stuff! .......... tom g
                                      From: David Foote <moefoote@...>
                                      To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                      Sent: Friday, March 15, 2013 6:29 AM
                                      Subject: RE: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                       
                                      My relative is Andrew Hull Foote of Ft.Henry and Ft.Donelson fame. When he first was named Cmdr he at once cancelled the daily ration of "grog". I am reluctant to claim him yet!  To; "Charles" there is a John Gano of Co.F 62nd Illinois buried in Crawford Co. Il. He was born Green County, Ohio
                                      David Foote
                                      To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com From: spencdc@... Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2013 14:11:19 -0700 Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors 
                                      My gggrand-dad John Crank served with the Big Sandy Bttn, First Capitol Guards (US) and saw action at Satltville. My gg-uncle Tilman Mullins served with the 34th Virginia Cav Bttn., saw action at the Eastern Cavalry field at Gettysburg, a year later was captured and sent off to Camp Chase prison where he died.
                                      Antother ggg grand dad David Ratliff served with the 45th Ky Infantry, died od illness in a military hospital. A couple of Eldridge great uncles served with the 5th Ky Infantry (CSA) and both were wound at Snodgrass Hill at Chickamauga.  My great granmother had a number of nephews who were with the 1st Michigan Artillery.
                                      Dave

                                      From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                                      To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                      Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 2:50 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                       
                                      Charles, you probably have the same regimental history as I do (The Gallant Seventy-Eighth by Ron Gancas), but just in case I looked at the roster withion .. lots of guys with the "Mc" suffix, but no McComas .. I imagine their were lots of men that for whatever reason were not included on the roster (I also looked for possible misspellings, but no luck).. record keeping was likely less accurate then too .. you have some good sources there .. best wishes with your continued research . tom g

                                      From: Charles R. <na_jeb@...>
                                      To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                      Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 1:48 AM
                                      Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                       
                                      My great-grandfather, Martin L. McComas was also in the 78th PA. Infantry- Co. "D" as a private & a corporal,
                                      but doesn't show up in the regimental history & rosters therein!
                                      He later joined a 100 days regiment- the 194th PA. Infantry, Co. "E."
                                      Most of these facts came from great-grandma's pension applications, & Civil War Soldiers & Sailors Database.
                                      If anyone could point me in a better direction, I'd be most appreciative!
                                       
                                      Charles
                                      From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                                      To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                      Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2013 10:13 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                       
                                      Hello Dick and all:
                                      Dick, first I would like to thank you once again for publishing two of my articles online a few years ago .. I still refer to them often.  

                                      I always hoped that I had relatives on both sides, and over the years I found to my great satisfaction that I did.   On my mother's side, I had several relatives in the 78th Pennsylvania,  probably all cousins .. the surname was "Jack" .. one of the Jack boys was listed as a "musician", which further delighted me as I play a little music, too.  The 78th was in the Western Theater, most notably serving at Stones River.   My maternal grandmother was a Jack, married a Gano. They moved west, and my mother came along in Deming, New Mexico in 1913

                                      My branch of Gano's had a distant cousin in another branch, Richard Montgomery Gano, a Kentucky-born Confederate cavalry officer who served as a captain, then a colonel under John Hunt Morgan during the invasion of Kentucky in 1862, under Nathan Bedford Forrest at Chickamauga, and later as a brigadier general in command of Texas cavalry.  His grandfather was also a general in the War of 1812, and his great-grandfather, Rev. John Gano, was known as the "fighting chaplain" in the Revolutionary War, and was said to have baptized George Washington in the Potomac.  The Confederate general also had a rather famous great-great grandson, Howard Robard Hughes.

                                      On my father's side was my great-great-great (I think I have the number of "greats" right) grandfather Mills who was, as an Arkansas private, seriously wounded at Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge). The story goes that my g-g-g-grandmother drove the family buckboard up from southwestern Arkansas and took him home where he recovered, and his g-g-grandson, my dad, was born there in 1908.  During the Depression, he headed west and met my mom in El Paso, where I was eventually born in 1947.

                                      Since both sides of my family were here during the Civil War, there are no doubt more that I don't know of.   Interesting stuff!!

                                      Thanks for the opportunity to share this.

                                      Tom Gilbert
                                      From: Dick Weeks <shotgun@...>
                                      To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 11:28 PM
                                      Subject: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                       
                                      First, I would like to introduce myself.  Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate.  My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun.  I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have. 
                                       
                                      I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try to start a thread.  The reason I am doing this is self serving.  I want to put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors, Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me with that.  Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family back as far as I have.  I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the American Revolution.  However I am sure there are many of you that have stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War.  I would like to share those stories with visitors to my website (civilwarhome.com).  Since I made it, I know the rule is this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors.  You may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle they were engaged in but was passed on to your family.  It doesn't have to battle related as long as it is Civil War related.  I have ancestors that served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories were not always talking about a battle.  If this thread works I will share their stories with the group.
                                       
                                      The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I found amusing in my family's history.  My great great grandmother was Mary Mathews Byers.  She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her home in full Confederate uniform.  He said when leaving, "If it is a boy, name him for me."  She answered she would do so even it were a girl.  And she did.  My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks.  The family always called her "Charlie."
                                       
                                      I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                                      Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                                      http://www.civilwarhome.com
                                    • David Foote
                                      I have in my possession a book Genealogy and History of the Foote Family by Abram W. Foote 1907. Don t really know how to read this book, but have found a
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Mar 20, 2013
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        I have in my possession a book "Genealogy and History of the Foote Family"  by Abram W.  Foote 1907.

                                        Don't really know how to read this book, but have found a direct line with the Commodore, but also, if I read it right, with Harriett Beecher Stowe. Do not know about Shelby. Would not that be wonderful? I know of Henry. David F.


                                        To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                        From: tomgilbert47@...
                                        Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2013 08:17:34 -0700
                                        Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors

                                         

                                        David,
                                        What relation are you to the Admiral? Are you also related to Shelby?  Or to Henry S. Foote (born in Virginia, pre-war Mississippi Senator/Governor, Conf. Rep from Tennessee)? I've often wondered whether Shelby was related to either.. Shelby of course was from Mississippi, while Andrew was from Connecticut, although that doesn't mean anything, as for example my 19th century maternal ancestors were in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, both families moved to Florida where my grandparents married around the turn of the century and soon moved to New Mexico where my mother was born in 1913! ......  John Gano might be a distant relative, I think one of the Gano branches headed out that direction in the early 1800's (when I say branches, and that's probably not correct genealogical terminology, I mean that way back in the late1600's (or maybe it was very early 1700's) one of the close descendants of the immigrant from France had 7 sons, and my genealogist cousin who compiled all this says that the family then started to spread out all over the country .. interesting stuff! .......... tom g
                                        From: David Foote <moefoote@...>
                                        To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                        Sent: Friday, March 15, 2013 6:29 AM
                                        Subject: RE: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                         
                                        My relative is Andrew Hull Foote of Ft.Henry and Ft.Donelson fame. When he first was named Cmdr he at once cancelled the daily ration of "grog". I am reluctant to claim him yet!  To; "Charles" there is a John Gano of Co.F 62nd Illinois buried in Crawford Co. Il. He was born Green County, Ohio
                                        David Foote
                                        To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com From: spencdc@... Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2013 14:11:19 -0700 Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors 
                                        My gggrand-dad John Crank served with the Big Sandy Bttn, First Capitol Guards (US) and saw action at Satltville. My gg-uncle Tilman Mullins served with the 34th Virginia Cav Bttn., saw action at the Eastern Cavalry field at Gettysburg, a year later was captured and sent off to Camp Chase prison where he died.
                                        Antother ggg grand dad David Ratliff served with the 45th Ky Infantry, died od illness in a military hospital. A couple of Eldridge great uncles served with the 5th Ky Infantry (CSA) and both were wound at Snodgrass Hill at Chickamauga.  My great granmother had a number of nephews who were with the 1st Michigan Artillery.
                                        Dave

                                        From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                                        To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                        Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 2:50 PM
                                        Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                         
                                        Charles, you probably have the same regimental history as I do (The Gallant Seventy-Eighth by Ron Gancas), but just in case I looked at the roster withion .. lots of guys with the "Mc" suffix, but no McComas .. I imagine their were lots of men that for whatever reason were not included on the roster (I also looked for possible misspellings, but no luck).. record keeping was likely less accurate then too .. you have some good sources there .. best wishes with your continued research . tom g

                                        From: Charles R. <na_jeb@...>
                                        To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                        Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 1:48 AM
                                        Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                         
                                        My great-grandfather, Martin L. McComas was also in the 78th PA. Infantry- Co. "D" as a private & a corporal,
                                        but doesn't show up in the regimental history & rosters therein!
                                        He later joined a 100 days regiment- the 194th PA. Infantry, Co. "E."
                                        Most of these facts came from great-grandma's pension applications, & Civil War Soldiers & Sailors Database.
                                        If anyone could point me in a better direction, I'd be most appreciative!
                                         
                                        Charles
                                        From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                                        To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                        Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2013 10:13 PM
                                        Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                         
                                        Hello Dick and all:
                                        Dick, first I would like to thank you once again for publishing two of my articles online a few years ago .. I still refer to them often.  

                                        I always hoped that I had relatives on both sides, and over the years I found to my great satisfaction that I did.   On my mother's side, I had several relatives in the 78th Pennsylvania,  probably all cousins .. the surname was "Jack" .. one of the Jack boys was listed as a "musician", which further delighted me as I play a little music, too.  The 78th was in the Western Theater, most notably serving at Stones River.   My maternal grandmother was a Jack, married a Gano. They moved west, and my mother came along in Deming, New Mexico in 1913

                                        My branch of Gano's had a distant cousin in another branch, Richard Montgomery Gano, a Kentucky-born Confederate cavalry officer who served as a captain, then a colonel under John Hunt Morgan during the invasion of Kentucky in 1862, under Nathan Bedford Forrest at Chickamauga, and later as a brigadier general in command of Texas cavalry.  His grandfather was also a general in the War of 1812, and his great-grandfather, Rev. John Gano, was known as the "fighting chaplain" in the Revolutionary War, and was said to have baptized George Washington in the Potomac.  The Confederate general also had a rather famous great-great grandson, Howard Robard Hughes.

                                        On my father's side was my great-great-great (I think I have the number of "greats" right) grandfather Mills who was, as an Arkansas private, seriously wounded at Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge). The story goes that my g-g-g-grandmother drove the family buckboard up from southwestern Arkansas and took him home where he recovered, and his g-g-grandson, my dad, was born there in 1908.  During the Depression, he headed west and met my mom in El Paso, where I was eventually born in 1947.

                                        Since both sides of my family were here during the Civil War, there are no doubt more that I don't know of.   Interesting stuff!!

                                        Thanks for the opportunity to share this.

                                        Tom Gilbert
                                        From: Dick Weeks <shotgun@...>
                                        To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                        Sent: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 11:28 PM
                                        Subject: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                         
                                        First, I would like to introduce myself.  Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate.  My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun.  I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have. 
                                         
                                        I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try to start a thread.  The reason I am doing this is self serving.  I want to put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors, Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me with that.  Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family back as far as I have.  I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the American Revolution.  However I am sure there are many of you that have stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War.  I would like to share those stories with visitors to my website (civilwarhome.com).  Since I made it, I know the rule is this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors.  You may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle they were engaged in but was passed on to your family.  It doesn't have to battle related as long as it is Civil War related.  I have ancestors that served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories were not always talking about a battle.  If this thread works I will share their stories with the group.
                                         
                                        The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I found amusing in my family's history.  My great great grandmother was Mary Mathews Byers.  She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her home in full Confederate uniform.  He said when leaving, "If it is a boy, name him for me."  She answered she would do so even it were a girl.  And she did.  My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks.  The family always called her "Charlie."
                                         
                                        I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                                        Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                                        http://www.civilwarhome.com

                                      • Tom Gilbert
                                        That would indeed be very special .. I have found genealogy books very hard to read .. need an intepreter for a lot of it (or I guess, a genealogist!) From:
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Mar 20, 2013
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          That would indeed be very special .. I have found genealogy books very hard to read .. need an intepreter for a lot of it (or I guess, a genealogist!)

                                          From: David Foote <moefoote@...>
                                          To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                          Sent: Wednesday, March 20, 2013 9:51 AM
                                          Subject: RE: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                           
                                          I have in my possession a book "Genealogy and History of the Foote Family"  by Abram W.  Foote 1907.

                                          Don't really know how to read this book, but have found a direct line with the Commodore, but also, if I read it right, with Harriett Beecher Stowe. Do not know about Shelby. Would not that be wonderful? I know of Henry. David F.
                                          To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com From: tomgilbert47@... Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2013 08:17:34 -0700 Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors 
                                          David,
                                          What relation are you to the Admiral? Are you also related to Shelby?  Or to Henry S. Foote (born in Virginia, pre-war Mississippi Senator/Governor, Conf. Rep from Tennessee)? I've often wondered whether Shelby was related to either.. Shelby of course was from Mississippi, while Andrew was from Connecticut, although that doesn't mean anything, as for example my 19th century maternal ancestors were in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, both families moved to Florida where my grandparents married around the turn of the century and soon moved to New Mexico where my mother was born in 1913! ......  John Gano might be a distant relative, I think one of the Gano branches headed out that direction in the early 1800's (when I say branches, and that's probably not correct genealogical terminology, I mean that way back in the late1600's (or maybe it was very early 1700's) one of the close descendants of the immigrant from France had 7 sons, and my genealogist cousin who compiled all this says that the family then started to spread out all over the country .. interesting stuff! .......... tom g
                                          From: David Foote <moefoote@...>
                                          To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                          Sent: Friday, March 15, 2013 6:29 AM
                                          Subject: RE: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                           
                                          My relative is Andrew Hull Foote of Ft.Henry and Ft.Donelson fame. When he first was named Cmdr he at once cancelled the daily ration of "grog". I am reluctant to claim him yet!  To; "Charles" there is a John Gano of Co.F 62nd Illinois buried in Crawford Co. Il. He was born Green County, Ohio
                                          David Foote
                                          To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com From: spencdc@... Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2013 14:11:19 -0700 Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors 
                                          My gggrand-dad John Crank served with the Big Sandy Bttn, First Capitol Guards (US) and saw action at Satltville. My gg-uncle Tilman Mullins served with the 34th Virginia Cav Bttn., saw action at the Eastern Cavalry field at Gettysburg, a year later was captured and sent off to Camp Chase prison where he died.
                                          Antother ggg grand dad David Ratliff served with the 45th Ky Infantry, died od illness in a military hospital. A couple of Eldridge great uncles served with the 5th Ky Infantry (CSA) and both were wound at Snodgrass Hill at Chickamauga.  My great granmother had a number of nephews who were with the 1st Michigan Artillery.
                                          Dave

                                          From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                                          To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                          Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 2:50 PM
                                          Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                           
                                          Charles, you probably have the same regimental history as I do (The Gallant Seventy-Eighth by Ron Gancas), but just in case I looked at the roster withion .. lots of guys with the "Mc" suffix, but no McComas .. I imagine their were lots of men that for whatever reason were not included on the roster (I also looked for possible misspellings, but no luck).. record keeping was likely less accurate then too .. you have some good sources there .. best wishes with your continued research . tom g

                                          From: Charles R. <na_jeb@...>
                                          To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                          Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2013 1:48 AM
                                          Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                           
                                          My great-grandfather, Martin L. McComas was also in the 78th PA. Infantry- Co. "D" as a private & a corporal,
                                          but doesn't show up in the regimental history & rosters therein!
                                          He later joined a 100 days regiment- the 194th PA. Infantry, Co. "E."
                                          Most of these facts came from great-grandma's pension applications, & Civil War Soldiers & Sailors Database.
                                          If anyone could point me in a better direction, I'd be most appreciative!
                                           
                                          Charles
                                          From: Tom Gilbert <tomgilbert47@...>
                                          To: "civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com" <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
                                          Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2013 10:13 PM
                                          Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                           
                                          Hello Dick and all:
                                          Dick, first I would like to thank you once again for publishing two of my articles online a few years ago .. I still refer to them often.  

                                          I always hoped that I had relatives on both sides, and over the years I found to my great satisfaction that I did.   On my mother's side, I had several relatives in the 78th Pennsylvania,  probably all cousins .. the surname was "Jack" .. one of the Jack boys was listed as a "musician", which further delighted me as I play a little music, too.  The 78th was in the Western Theater, most notably serving at Stones River.   My maternal grandmother was a Jack, married a Gano. They moved west, and my mother came along in Deming, New Mexico in 1913

                                          My branch of Gano's had a distant cousin in another branch, Richard Montgomery Gano, a Kentucky-born Confederate cavalry officer who served as a captain, then a colonel under John Hunt Morgan during the invasion of Kentucky in 1862, under Nathan Bedford Forrest at Chickamauga, and later as a brigadier general in command of Texas cavalry.  His grandfather was also a general in the War of 1812, and his great-grandfather, Rev. John Gano, was known as the "fighting chaplain" in the Revolutionary War, and was said to have baptized George Washington in the Potomac.  The Confederate general also had a rather famous great-great grandson, Howard Robard Hughes.

                                          On my father's side was my great-great-great (I think I have the number of "greats" right) grandfather Mills who was, as an Arkansas private, seriously wounded at Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge). The story goes that my g-g-g-grandmother drove the family buckboard up from southwestern Arkansas and took him home where he recovered, and his g-g-grandson, my dad, was born there in 1908.  During the Depression, he headed west and met my mom in El Paso, where I was eventually born in 1947.

                                          Since both sides of my family were here during the Civil War, there are no doubt more that I don't know of.   Interesting stuff!!

                                          Thanks for the opportunity to share this.

                                          Tom Gilbert
                                          From: Dick Weeks <shotgun@...>
                                          To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                          Sent: Tuesday, March 5, 2013 11:28 PM
                                          Subject: [civilwarwest] Civil War Ancestors
                                           
                                          First, I would like to introduce myself.  Some of you may recognize me while others may not, so I think an introduction is appropriate.  My name is Dick Weeks, folks on the Internet call me Shotgun.  I started this group some years ago in hope of learning more about the Western Theater, and learn I have. 
                                           
                                          I thought that since things are quite in the group right now I would try to start a thread.  The reason I am doing this is self serving.  I want to put a new section on my website and call it "Our Civil War Ancestors, Stories from the Descendants (or something like that) and you folks can help me with that.  Fully realizing that many of you may not have traced your family back as far as I have.  I am a member of the Sons of the American Revolution which means that I can trace my heritage back in a direct linage to the American Revolution.  However I am sure there are many of you that have stories about your ancestors that served on both sides in the Civil War.  I would like to share those stories with visitors to my website (civilwarhome.com).  Since I made it, I know the rule is this group is restricted to discussing only the Western Theater but in this case I will lift the rule when it comes to discussing your ancestors.  You may have a story about your ancestor which does not even involve a battle they were engaged in but was passed on to your family.  It doesn't have to battle related as long as it is Civil War related.  I have ancestors that served at Vicksburg, Atlanta, Gettysburg, and 2nd Manassas and their stories were not always talking about a battle.  If this thread works I will share their stories with the group.
                                           
                                          The first story that I have is not about a battle but something that I found amusing in my family's history.  My great great grandmother was Mary Mathews Byers.  She was expecting when a kinsman, Charles Wright, visited her home in full Confederate uniform.  He said when leaving, "If it is a boy, name him for me."  She answered she would do so even it were a girl.  And she did.  My great grandmother's name is Charlie Wright Byers Weeks.  The family always called her "Charlie."
                                           
                                          I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant
                                          Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
                                          http://www.civilwarhome.com
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