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Re: Was Pemberton Wrong, Bad, Incompetent (Vicksburg Campaign)

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  • Tony
    ... Starting in early October IIRC, Grant asked repeatedly for direction. What am I to do? What is my objective? How should I proceed. Receiving absolutely
    Message 1 of 52 , Jan 10, 2013
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Ned Baldwin" wrote:
      >
      > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Tony" wrote:
      > > ... forget what I think, put yourself in Grant's position. He seriously considered the move, and shelved his plans in favor of Lincoln and Halleck's, resulting in the double disaster of Holly Springs / Chickasaw Bayou.
      > >
      >
      > Shelving his plan did not result in the disaster of Holly Springs.
      >
      >
      > > Who suffers that kind of indignity without complaint?
      >
      > There was no indignity. You are inventing your own version of history.
      >

      Starting in early October IIRC, Grant asked repeatedly for direction. What am I to do? What is my objective? How should I proceed. Receiving absolutely no direction from Halleck, Grant outlined a plan: consolidate his force against Holly Springs, drive Pemberton south rebuilding the railroad as he went, take Vicksburg from the interior. Still, Halleck remained mute about Grant's objectives, despite the fact that Halleck was aware that McClernand had bent Lincoln's ear towards a riverine campaign.

      As Grant began to build momentum and drive Pemberton south, Halleck began hinting at a riverine campaign, but still no firm instruction. Then men began arrive in Grant's department with vague orders to report to McClernand for a riverine campaign. Asked for clarification, Halleck dissimilated: the men in your department are yours to command, and you can fight the enemy when and where you please. Then Grant requests 12 locomotives to keep his supply line open. Halleck responds that he not only can't have the locomotives, but suggests that Grant should fall back to the Memphis-to-Corinth line and limit himself to short marches to strike the enemy. But Grant is already committed to pushing Pemberton off the Tallahatchie so he continues south, ordering Sherman to join him. Then Halleck tells him to have Sherman's men back in Memphis by December 20th. Grant again asks for clarification, Halleck vaugely responds "current movement approved, do not go to far."

      So we have Lincoln stabbing Grant in the back, and Halleck feeding him lies. Would there have been a disaster at Holly Springs without the riverine expedition? Maybe, but reducing Grant's footprint at Oxford by a full infantry division and sending two full regiments of cavalry down river that could have been better utilized near Grenada certainly didn't help.

      As far as inventing my own history, go bugger yourself in the earhole.
    • Ned Baldwin
      ... He did receive direction from Halleck; Halleck did not remain Mute. ... Baseless. ... Would there have been a disaster at Holly Springs without the
      Message 52 of 52 , Jan 10, 2013
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        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Tony" wrote:
        > Starting in early October IIRC, Grant asked repeatedly for direction. What am I to do? What is my objective? How should I proceed. Receiving absolutely no direction from Halleck, Grant outlined a plan: consolidate his force against Holly Springs, drive Pemberton south rebuilding the railroad as he went, take Vicksburg from the interior. Still, Halleck remained mute about Grant's objectives, despite the fact that Halleck was aware that McClernand had bent Lincoln's ear towards a riverine campaign.
        >
        >

        He did receive direction from Halleck; Halleck did not remain Mute.



        > So we have Lincoln stabbing Grant in the back, and Halleck feeding him lies.
        >

        Baseless.


        >
        Would there have been a disaster at Holly Springs without the riverine expedition?
        >

        Absolutely.



        > As far as inventing my own history, go bugger yourself in the earhole.
        >

        Truth hurts huh.
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