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Re: [civilwarwest] Importance of Vicksburg

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  • Chet Diestel
           As important as any strategic, logistical and even commercial effects that came with the fall of Vicksburg was its psychological effects on both
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 24, 2011
             As important as any strategic, logistical and even commercial effects that came with the fall of Vicksburg was its psychological effects on both sides.
             The Confederacy had been cut in two and it has a profound effect on the thinking of both sides regarding the war and its eventual outcome. The most common word was "unmitigated" --- an unmitigated disaster for the South and an unmitigated triumph for the North.
            From July 4, 1863 the Confederacy --- for all practical purposes --- ceased to be one nation and became, at least on the tactical level, two separate nations with only the most tenuous of political and military connections.
           And then there was the effect on those powers on the other side of the Atlantic.
                        With regards,
                              Chet

      --- On Mon, 1/24/11, Patricia Swan <pbswan@...> wrote:

      From: Patricia Swan <pbswan@...>
      Subject: [civilwarwest] Importance of Vicksburg
      To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, January 24, 2011, 12:57 PM

       
      > With regard to Vicksburg,I think its fall was less important because
      > the Mississippi was under effective control of the Union long before that.
      Chris, the grain farmers of the upper Mid-west would not have agreed
      with this statement. No transport of goods was being made between the
      Yazoo and Port Hudson until Grant's expedition, which culminated in the
      fall of Vicksburg. This blockage meant that goods could not be shipped
      to or obtained from the port of New Orleans via the Mississippi.
      Although alternate trade routes were being developed between Chicago and
      the East, the people of the upper Mid-west resonated strongly with
      Lincoln's pleasure that "the Father of Waters again goes unvexed to the
      sea."
       

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