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Re: .69 caliber Minie Ball Mystery [1 Attachment]

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  • carlw4514
    of course all of this from Shotgun confirms it, I should have mentioned. I think so much of the Hogg book that I wanted to find something there too.
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 11, 2010
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      of course all of this from Shotgun confirms it, I should have mentioned. I think so much of the Hogg book that I wanted to find something there too.

      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Dick Weeks" <shotgun@...> wrote:
      >
      > Tim, maybe I can shed a little light on this subject. The write-up on my website referring to a .69 caliber minie ball came from The Civil War Society's "Encyclopedia of the Civil War" page 338. The original Model 1842 was indeed a smooth bore. However, the following write-up is in "An Introduction to Civil War Small Arms" by Earl J. Coates and Dean S. Thomas, page 11:
      > "The adoption of the rifle musket by the U.S. Army in 1855 made the smooth-bore model 1842 obsolete. At that time, those in the hands of the federal government were returned to the arsenals and the barrels were rifled. As with most smoothbore arms, the original model 1842 had no rear sight. The additional range and accuracy gained by rifling made a rear sight desirable; many were added to government arms at this time."
      > Along with the write-up there is a photo of an ammo box that has the stencil "RIFLE MUSKET 69IN CARTRIDGES" on it.
      >
      > In this same document there is a write-up on Belgian and French rifled muskets that were .69 Caliber. I found this interesting in the article, ". . . .most of the Belgian or French rifled musket with calibers ranging from .69 to .71 caliber were considered worthless by those who were forced to use them. The 102nd Pennsylvania was issued such an arm in 1861. The regiment was engaged in action during the Peninsula Campaign in May 1862 and after the battles of Williamsburg and Fair Oaks, the Belgian muskets had disappeared. . . ."
      >
      > Now, I make no claim as to the validity of this information, I can only tell you where it is located.
      >
      > I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
      > Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
      > http://www.civilwarhome.com
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