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Re: Female soldiers in the Western Theater

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  • swan_pat_estelle
    Susan, Thanks for your response. I agree that Blanton and Cook is an excellent, and perhaps the best, source for an overview of women soldiers in the Civil
    Message 1 of 7 , May 2 4:19 PM
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      Susan,
      Thanks for your response. I agree that Blanton and Cook is an excellent, and perhaps the best, source for an overview of women soldiers in the Civil War. Nonetheless, their focus is on the more general topic and not on the individual soldiers and where and with whom they fought. For example, they were the first to identify the medical records for Frances Hook (about whom I wrote earlier in this thread), but they do not identify with whom or where she fought.

      My interest is those women who fought as soldiers and when and where they fought. I'm thinking that some folks on this forum may have very specific information about such service.

      pat-estelle

      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, Sweetsstar@... wrote:
      >
      > Best sources are They Fought Like Demons written by Deanne Blanton and
      > Uncommon Soldier by Laura Cook Burgess .
      > Susan Sweet
      > **************Check all of your email inboxes from anywhere on the web.
      > Try the new Email Toolbar now!
      > (http://toolbar.aol.com/mail/download.html?ncid=txtlnkusdown00000027)
      >
    • Sweetsstar@aol.com
      Oh sorry , Hope someone can help you . I would be interested in reading more about the women . Susan **************Check all of your email inboxes from
      Message 2 of 7 , May 2 4:21 PM
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        Oh sorry , Hope someone can help you .  I would be interested in reading more about the women .
        Susan
      • swan_pat_estelle
        Susan, Raul sent the following directly to me: Hi ! Since you are interesting, here is some information regarding your question
        Message 3 of 7 , May 3 7:48 AM
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          Susan,
          Raul sent the following directly to me:
          ""Hi !

          Since you are interesting, here is some information regarding your question

          www.latinamericanstudies.org/velazquez.htm:



          I would appreciate if you can sent this web about " Cubans in the U.S.Civil War " ( latinamericanstudies.org ) to the list, for some reasons the list can't get my e-mails but I always can get yours, thank you ! .

          Sincerely

          - Raul Hernandez-Baquero
          Florida""

          Has he been deleted from the group?

          In any case, the problem with this particular story of the Cuban-woman who wrote about her service during the Civil War is to find wartime evidence of her service. What wartime evidence exists of her service during the Civil War?

          Pat_Estelle


          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, Sweetsstar@... wrote:
          >
          > Oh sorry , Hope someone can help you . I would be interested in reading
          > more about the women .
          > Susan
          > **************Check all of your email inboxes from anywhere on the web.
          > Try the new Email Toolbar now!
          > (http://toolbar.aol.com/mail/download.html?ncid=txtlnkusdown00000027)
          >
        • Dave Gorski
          ... I can give you some names, but not much more for several. I m not sure how much is actually known about them. Perhaps an Internet search of the names can
          Message 4 of 7 , May 3 1:21 PM
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            >Who were the others who actually served as soldiers?

            I can give you some names, but not much more for several.
            I'm not sure how much is actually known about them. Perhaps
            an Internet search of the names can give you more information.

            Mary Burns enlisted in a Michigan unit but was identified as
            a woman shortly after her enlistment and dismissed.

            Frances Clalin was in a Union Missouri Cavalry Militia unit.

            Sara Collins enlisted in a Wisconsin Regiment but was discovered
            before her unit finished training.

            Sarah Emma Edmonds was in Company F, 2nd Michigan as
            "Franklin Thompson". According to my notes she served as
            a "male" nurse.

            Fanny Wilson enlisted in the 24th New Jersey. After she was
            discovered and discharged, she enlisted with the 3rd Illinois Cavalry.

            Jennie Hodges enlisted in the 95th Illinois under the name Albert
            Cashier. She served for 3 years and her gender was not discovered.
            She continued to live as a man until 1911 when she was involved
            in an automobile accident that landed her in a hospital for a lengthy
            period of time. That hospital stay uncovered her secret.

            Nellie A. K. enlisted into a unit in the Army of the Cumberland/
            She was discharged when her gender was revealed.

            Mary Wise was with an unknown Indiana unit for two years before
            being discovered. She was discharged but got her muster out pay.

            There were also a few women who fought as soldiers for the Confederacy.

            Mary and Molly Bell were discovered serving with Jubal Early
            for two years as Tom Parker and Bob Martin.

            Malinda Blalock / as Sam Blalock served for two months before being
            discovered and discharged.

            Amy Clarke was not discovered until she was wounded and captured.
            She was given a dress and sent home.

            Margaret Henry and Mary Wright were captured in uniform in Tennessee
            in March of 1865.

            One of the more famous was Laura J. Williams, who as Lt. Henry Benford,
            raised a Texas unit and led it at Shiloh.

            Wish I could be more specific for you. I've collected notes over the
            years and realize now that in my early years of note taking (30 years ago)
            sources were not as important to me as the stories. Lots of this
            type of thing I wish I could go back to, but alas. Anyway, hope this
            is of some help. I hope your search of the names will provide more

            Regards, Dave Gorski
          • Patricia Swan
            Dave, Thanks very much for your very informative list. Several of the women on your list are also mentioned in They Fought Like Demons as well as Hall s
            Message 5 of 7 , May 3 2:07 PM
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              Dave,
              Thanks very much for your very informative list. Several of the women
              on your list are also mentioned in "They Fought Like Demons" as well as
              Hall's more recent "Women on the Civil War Battlefront", though perhaps
              not all. Although I am not inquiring because of any writing project, I
              am inquiring about such women because my curiosity has been raised about
              how much is actually known about the service of women in the Civil War
              and how much is based more on folk lore. I am continuing to read and
              look for wartime documentation of women's service. I would consider a
              wartime letter from a soldier about a woman in his unit, a wartime
              newspaper interview with a woman soldier, or a military record as among
              possible documentation of a woman's service. After the war the romantic
              notion of women soldiers may have overtaken some supposed sources of
              information.
              Again, thank you for taking the time to give such a thoughtful
              response. I'm still hoping to hear from folks who have documentation.
              I do think that the case of Jennie Hodges (alias Albert Cashier) is
              sufficiently documented. I wonder about many of the others who are said
              to have actually served in the field.
              pat_estelle

              Dave Gorski wrote:
              >
              >
              > >Who were the others who actually served as soldiers?
              >
              > I can give you some names, but not much more for several.
              > I'm not sure how much is actually known about them. Perhaps
              > an Internet search of the names can give you more information.
              >
              > Mary Burns enlisted in a Michigan unit but was identified as
              > a woman shortly after her enlistment and dismissed.
              >
              > Frances Clalin was in a Union Missouri Cavalry Militia unit.
              >
              > Sara Collins enlisted in a Wisconsin Regiment but was discovered
              > before her unit finished training.
              >
              > Sarah Emma Edmonds was in Company F, 2nd Michigan as
              > "Franklin Thompson". According to my notes she served as
              > a "male" nurse.
              >
              > Fanny Wilson enlisted in the 24th New Jersey. After she was
              > discovered and discharged, she enlisted with the 3rd Illinois Cavalry.
              >
              > Jennie Hodges enlisted in the 95th Illinois under the name Albert
              > Cashier. She served for 3 years and her gender was not discovered.
              > She continued to live as a man until 1911 when she was involved
              > in an automobile accident that landed her in a hospital for a lengthy
              > period of time. That hospital stay uncovered her secret.
              >
              > Nellie A. K. enlisted into a unit in the Army of the Cumberland/
              > She was discharged when her gender was revealed.
              >
              > Mary Wise was with an unknown Indiana unit for two years before
              > being discovered. She was discharged but got her muster out pay.
              >
              > There were also a few women who fought as soldiers for the Confederacy.
              >
              > Mary and Molly Bell were discovered serving with Jubal Early
              > for two years as Tom Parker and Bob Martin.
              >
              > Malinda Blalock / as Sam Blalock served for two months before being
              > discovered and discharged.
              >
              > Amy Clarke was not discovered until she was wounded and captured.
              > She was given a dress and sent home.
              >
              > Margaret Henry and Mary Wright were captured in uniform in Tennessee
              > in March of 1865.
              >
              > One of the more famous was Laura J. Williams, who as Lt. Henry Benford,
              > raised a Texas unit and led it at Shiloh.
              >
              > Wish I could be more specific for you. I've collected notes over the
              > years and realize now that in my early years of note taking (30 years ago)
              > sources were not as important to me as the stories. Lots of this
              > type of thing I wish I could go back to, but alas. Anyway, hope this
              > is of some help. I hope your search of the names will provide more
              >
              > Regards, Dave Gorski
              >
              >
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