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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Bobrick, at face value:

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  • jack
    ... From: William H Keene To: Sent: Monday, April 27, 2009 9:01 PM ... Not on Jan. 20th, 1862. They no
    Message 1 of 63 , Apr 27, 2009
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "William H Keene" <wh_keene@...>
      To: <civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, April 27, 2009 9:01 PM
      Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Bobrick, at face value:


      > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "jack" <jlawrence@...> wrote:
      >> ...
      >> They no longer existed as a military force.
      >> Did they?
      >They did.

      Not on Jan. 20th, 1862.

      They no longer existed as a military force and did until they were
      reconstituted into, asyou popinted out earlier, Johnston's reorganized
      forces.

      These boys didn't just pull back, some of them ran all the way to
      Murfessboro. It was disintergration of a force that left Midle Tennessee
      wide open, lost Kentucky and
      paved the way for Donelso and Henry-and set a pattern for the war in the
      west of linear defeat that didn't stop unti the Georgia border. Sounds like
      obliteration to me.
      They were not a military f rce when they fled. they wee combat neffectiv
      and, as ar as the soputh was cncerned, they were obliterated from the order
      of battle.

      Just because they appeared later reconstituted dopes not mean they were
      anything in between. Until the were gathered up,r eorganied, refited and
      sent out under new leadership, they were nothing to the army.

      They had ceased to exist as a military force.

      You know, they buned their transport to avoid pursuit.

      An opposed river crossing is probably the most dfficult problem a
      commander might face. They were incapable of even opposing it. They didn't
      run because they were cowards. They ran because hey were whipped and had no
      fight left.

      Regards,

      Jack


      .....to the persistent secessionist, why, death is mercy, and the quicker he
      or she is disposed of the better...Mjr. Gen. W. T. Sherman, Jan. 31, 1864.
    • Tony Gunter
      ... As evidenced by the claim that an enemy army was obliterated at Mill Springs. By those definitions, I would say that McPherson obliterated a Confederate
      Message 63 of 63 , Apr 28, 2009
        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, Bob Taubman <rtaubman@...> wrote:
        >
        > What are "Thomas fan definitions"?

        As evidenced by the claim that an enemy army was obliterated at Mill Springs.

        By those definitions, I would say that McPherson obliterated a Confederate army at Raymond.
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