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Bobrick, at face value:

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  • Tony Gunter
    Interesting thing about Bobrick s speech is the different treatment he gives Shiloh and Mill Springs. The similarities of these two battles is striking: a
    Message 1 of 63 , Apr 22, 2009
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      Interesting thing about Bobrick's speech is the different treatment he gives Shiloh and Mill Springs.

      The similarities of these two battles is striking: a Confederate force launches a surprise attack on an isolated federal army in an attempt to defeat it in detail before reinforcements can arrive. Because the federals have not entrenched, the Confederates enjoy initial success. The federal commander shows up some time after the fighting has started, and organizes a masterful and dogged defense, and the attackers are beaten back after the Confederate commander is killed. Reinforcements arrive after the battle has been decided, the result being that the Confederate army has been defeated and major strategic advantages have been gained.

      This describes both battles, but at Mill Springs, the commander is the master of war, at Shiloh, the commander is a drunken fool.
    • Tony Gunter
      ... As evidenced by the claim that an enemy army was obliterated at Mill Springs. By those definitions, I would say that McPherson obliterated a Confederate
      Message 63 of 63 , Apr 28, 2009
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        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, Bob Taubman <rtaubman@...> wrote:
        >
        > What are "Thomas fan definitions"?

        As evidenced by the claim that an enemy army was obliterated at Mill Springs.

        By those definitions, I would say that McPherson obliterated a Confederate army at Raymond.
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