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Civil War Talk Radio/New Orleans Revisited

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  • Carl Williams
    Good show last week has the author Michael D. Pierson on his book: Mutiny at Fort Jackson: The Untold Story of the Fall of New Orleans . This author is taking
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 5, 2009
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      Good show last week has the author Michael D. Pierson on his book:
      "Mutiny at Fort Jackson: The Untold Story of the Fall of New Orleans". This author is taking another look at what happened there, as it appears historians have not fully examined this Confederate fiasco. I personally doubt if the outcome was ultimately in doubt for New Orleans, but a case can even be made that the city may not have fallen till much later or certainly with much more difficulty if the garrison hadn't gone belly up in a basically treasonous manner.

      One thing that jumped out at me was the "German Effect", I'll call it, something that I have noticed before and has a slight personal interest for me. German immigrants tended to have a tough time taking the Rebel Stand when that was expected by the larger community if living in the South, and they were a third of the troops there at Fort Jackson. [you have to listen to the show or read the book.]

      And I'll stop here and say the author DOES NOT make the case that the lack of loyalty to the CS side with the Germans in particular was an essential factor, only a contributing factor.

      Nonetheless, there it is. Usually, it would seem, the tendency of German immigrants to sympathize with the Union side played itself out by the actions of the majority of those who could decide which army they might join: they would just go and join the Union Army. That isn't to say there weren't pro-Confederate Germans and perhaps even CS German Immigrant Regiments [although I don't think so]. But there are certainly incidents like this [sorry, can't conjure up any other examples at the moment]. As for a personal interest, perhaps more later, but it involves post-civil war stories of continuing tension in the South with some German groups that I am aware of.

      On my computer the show loads right up when I go to:
      http://www.modavox.com/WTRStudioA/HostModaviewForWTR.aspx?ShowId=446

      if that formats with breaks you can try:
      http://tinyurl.com/an538h

      The site layout is not user friendly, you have to look in the middle there for "archives" in the content library and click on the 2/27 show.
    • Carl Williams
      BTW, Prof. P. s show has a website now http://cwtr.org/
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 7, 2009
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        BTW, Prof. P.'s show has a website now

        http://cwtr.org/
      • Joseph R. Reinhart
        Carl There were no German regiments in the Confederate army. The Confederates did not trust the German s loyalty to the C.S.A cause and limited their
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 7, 2009
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          Carl
          There were no German regiments in the Confederate army. The Confederates did not trust the German's loyalty to the C.S.A cause and limited their aggregation in units. As far as I can tell the most Germans in one unit were in the 20th Louisiana Infantry (Col. Augustus Reichard). The 20th contained three or four German companies and 4 Irish companies.
          Joe


          From: Carl Williams <carlw4514@...>
          To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, March 5, 2009 9:20:26 AM
          Subject: [civilwarwest] Civil War Talk Radio/New Orleans Revisited

          Good show last week has the author Michael D. Pierson on his book:
          "Mutiny at Fort Jackson: The Untold Story of the Fall of New Orleans". This author is taking another look at what happened there, as it appears historians have not fully examined this Confederate fiasco. I personally doubt if the outcome was ultimately in doubt for New Orleans, but a case can even be made that the city may not have fallen till much later or certainly with much more difficulty if the garrison hadn't gone belly up in a basically treasonous manner.

          One thing that jumped out at me was the "German Effect", I'll call it, something that I have noticed before and has a slight personal interest for me. German immigrants tended to have a tough time taking the Rebel Stand when that was expected by the larger community if living in the South, and they were a third of the troops there at Fort Jackson. [you have to listen to the show or read the book.]

          And I'll stop here and say the author DOES NOT make the case that the lack of loyalty to the CS side with the Germans in particular was an essential factor, only a contributing factor.

          Nonetheless, there it is. Usually, it would seem, the tendency of German immigrants to sympathize with the Union side played itself out by the actions of the majority of those who could decide which army they might join: they would just go and join the Union Army. That isn't to say there weren't pro-Confederate Germans and perhaps even CS German Immigrant Regiments [although I don't think so]. But there are certainly incidents like this [sorry, can't conjure up any other examples at the moment]. As for a personal interest, perhaps more later, but it involves post-civil war stories of continuing tension in the South with some German groups that I am aware of.

          On my computer the show loads right up when I go to:
          http://www.modavox. com/WTRStudioA/ HostModaviewForW TR.aspx?ShowId= 446

          if that formats with breaks you can try:
          http://tinyurl. com/an538h

          The site layout is not user friendly, you have to look in the middle there for "archives" in the content library and click on the 2/27 show.

        • rbaquero@netzero.net
          As far as I know until today, Germans were backing the** North openly ** specifically the ones in Texas, this information regarding Louisiana is new to me . -
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 7, 2009
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             As far as I know until today, Germans were backing the** North openly ** specifically the ones in Texas, this information regarding Louisiana is new to me .

            - Raul 



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          • Dave Gorski
            According to the Encyclopedia of the Confederacy, Richard Current editor, The second largest white ethnic group in the Confederacy was composed of German
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 7, 2009
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              According to the "Encyclopedia of the Confederacy," Richard
              Current editor, "The second largest white ethnic group in the
              Confederacy was composed of German immigrants." There
              were 73,597 in the South just prior to the Civil War.

              The entry in the "Encyclopedia" is written by Jason Silverman.
              Silverman notes, " Ironically, despite their disaffection, because
              of their sheer numbers, the largest number of foreign troops
              sent by Texas into battle were German."

              Although the majority of these immigrants (over 50,000)
              were located in Texas, a number of German companies were
              formed in the east.

              A company was raised in Wilmington and it fought with the 18th
              North Carolina. Another company was raised in Charleston calling
              itself "The German Volunteers." There were also parts of 4th Brigade
              of the South Carolina militia known as "The Palmetto Schutzen"and
              "The German Fusiliers." A company in the South Carolina Cavalry
              were known as "German Hussars. There were also three companies
              in the South Carolina Artillery formed by Germans.

              Col. Augustus Reichard , Col. Leon von Zincken, Col. Gustav Hoffman,
              Lt. Col. victor von Scheliha, Lt. Col. B. F. Eshleman, Lt. Col. John P.
              Emrich, Lt. Col. B.W. Frobel and Col. Augustus Buchel were Coonfederate
              officers who were German immigrants.

              Silverman suggests for further reading;
              "German Seed in Texas Soil," by Terry Jordan
              "The German Texans," by Glen Lich
              "The Virginia Germans," by Klaus Wust
              as well as two books written by himself, Jason Silverman,
              "Beyond the Melting Pot in Dixie," and "Stars, Bars and Foreigners."

              Regards, Dave Gorski
            • Joseph R. Reinhart
              New Orleans had a large German (and Irish) population. Some Germans enlisted there. There were Germans and Irish in the Washington Artillery, 5th Company, but
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 7, 2009
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                New Orleans had a large German (and Irish) population. Some Germans enlisted there. There were Germans and Irish in the Washington Artillery, 5th Company, but they drove the wagons and did the dirty work.
                Joe


                From: "rbaquero@..." <rbaquero@...>
                To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Saturday, March 7, 2009 10:17:35 AM
                Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Civil War Talk Radio/New Orleans Revisited

                 

                 As far as I know until today, Germans were backing the** North openly ** specifically the ones in Texas, this information regarding Louisiana is new to me .

                - Raul 



                ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ ___
                Click here to find the perfect picture with our powerful photo search features.

              • Carl Williams
                thanks very much to all. I may be able to post my little story of post-civil war German/Reb altercation pretty soon. It does involve Texas! I did find the
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 7, 2009
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                  thanks very much to all.

                  I may be able to post my little story of post-civil war German/Reb altercation pretty soon. It does involve Texas!

                  I did find the following interesting:

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forty-Eighters
                • Joseph R. Reinhart
                  Carl You are probably aware of it but the best source for info about Germans in the Confederacy is a book entitled Foreigners in the Confederacy written by
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 7, 2009
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                    Carl
                    You are probably aware of it but the best source for info about Germans in the Confederacy is a book entitled Foreigners in the Confederacy written by Ella Lonn. It was reprinted in paperback a year or so ago by Univ. of N. C. Press. The work is dated and contains some stereotypes but also a wealth of information.
                    Joe

                    From: Carl Williams <carlw4514@...>
                    To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Saturday, March 7, 2009 2:51:33 PM
                    Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Civil War Talk Radio/New Orleans Revisited

                    thanks very much to all.

                    I may be able to post my little story of post-civil war German/Reb altercation pretty soon. It does involve Texas!

                    I did find the following interesting:

                    http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Forty-Eighters

                  • rbaquero@netzero.net
                    Hi Carl, this is exactly de information I have regarding the Germans ...Thanks ! - Raul ____________________________________________________________ Click here
                    Message 9 of 9 , Mar 8, 2009
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                      Hi Carl, this is exactly de information I have regarding the Germans ...Thanks !

                      - Raul



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