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Re: New Book - Western Regiment

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  • swan_pat_estelle
    Fran, That s a great story about the Georgetown, PA boats! Must have been a marvelous sight! ...
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 26, 2009
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      Fran,
      That's a great story about the Georgetown, PA boats! Must have been a
      marvelous sight!

      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, fwnash@... wrote:
      >
      >
                                                  
      Feb 25
      >
      >
      >
      > Ms S
      >
      >
      >
      > I confess I did not read the entire history of the 90th  IL Inf so
      thanks for correcting my misinfo.  24 steamboats => if you do the
      math that is almost 5 miles of steamboats.  I will read the report
      and check on the Father Thomas Kelly . 
      >
      >
      >
      > My interests turn to about ten boats my ancestors operated and about
      ten captains and pilots from the same little town, Georgetown, PA on
      the Ohio River within sight of Ohio and WV.   A son of one of the
      captains quit business school in Pittsburgh  in 1863 at the age of 19
      because his father, Jacob Poe, was ferrying troops and supplies on
      the TN River.  The son, George WE Poe, became a cub pilot on the CT
      Dumont when she participated in the most exciting event in
      Parkerburg's river history.  The wharf at the Little Kanawha River
      was filled with some 100 steamboats.  All of them with steam up and
      destined for points all over the Mississippi system.  The occasion
      was the return of Union soldier from the Civil War battlefields.  The
      soldiers piled into Parkersburg on B&O trains, marched to the  Ohio
      River, and boarded steamboats.  The CT Dumont ferried two crammed
      loads to Lawrenceburg, IN.
      >
      >
      >
      > The CT Dumont brought Gen Grant from Louisville to Cincinnati during
      the war and conveyed Mrs grant and their four children (unclear
      whether US was with them) from North Bend to Cincinnati on 3 Sep 1865. 
      >
      >
      >
      > These captains/pilots and steamboats have fascinating stories. 
      Hard facts are scattered and hard to come by. 
      >
      >
      >
      > Appreciate any reports where the steamboats and/or captains and
      pilots are named.
      >
      > Fran Nash
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "swan_pat_estelle" <pbswan@...>
      > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 8:14:37 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada
      Eastern
      > Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: New Book - Western Regiment
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Fran,
      > Thank you for your information about the two boats, the G.W. Graham
      > and the Norman. The information about the captain of the Norman was
      > especially interesting.
      >
      > If you'll look closely at the IL Adj. Gen. report, you'll see that the
      > 90th received their orders to go down to Vicksburg in May -- (and it
      > was actually late in May.) They didn't actually leave their post in
      > La Fayette, TN until June 6 to march to Memphis. After being wined
      > and dined by the local Irish community, they boarded the G.W. Graham
      > and departed on June 9. These dates are according to the regimental
      > records. Actually, there were a few stragglers who remained in
      > Memphis, having enjoyed the festivities a bit too much, and went down
      > a few days later. According to the regimental records, all companies
      > moved together. The chaplain, Thomas Kelly a Catholic priest,
      > actually described a larger flotilla ("twenty-four vessels carrying
      > eight thousand infantry, six batteries of artillery and the wagons and
      > ammunition of the whole division; the flagship first, the second
      > vessel carried the Commandant of the Brigade. The vessels kept about a
      > hundred yards from each other.")in a letter sent back to an order of
      > Catholic sisters in Chicago.
      >
      > Again, thanks for the good information about the transport boats. Old
      > Man River was certainly an interesting scene during this period!
      >
      > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com , fwnash@ wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
                                 
      Feb 25
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Ms S
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > The following link is a report of the Adjutant General of the
      State
      > of Illinois vol V, entitled History of the Ninetieth Infantry:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > http://www.illinoiscivilwar.org/cw90-agr.html
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > There were 10 companies in the 90th. IL Inf.  I suspect their
      > assigned duties went in different directions.  
      Some details on
      > the transports, the GW Graham and the Norman,   follow.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > GW Graham .  From the Charles Dana Gibson's "Dictionary of
      > Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and Sail Employed by the Union
      > Army 1861-1868", the GW Graham was a towboat for motar boat
      > gunboats.  Not sure what that means, but I do not think it was a
      > standard inland river packet.  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > In Capt Frederick Way Jr's "Way's Packet Directory, 1848-1994", the
      > GW Graham was a sidewheeler wooden hull packet built in Elizabeth, PA
      > in 1861.  It was a big boat 245x39x6.5.  Curiously Capt Frederick
      > Way indicates the GW Graham was used in the St Louis to Memphis trade
      > but does not mention her Civil War duties.  Its captain was Bart
      > Bowen, one of her pilots was Sam Bowen and their sister Amanda Bowen
      > was usually aboard.  Apparently the Bowens had southern sympathies
      > and were banned from Hannibal.  The packet burned in St Louis on 11
      > Jul 1867.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Combining the two bits of data, the GW Graham  was a big boat that
      > probably carried heavy freight like artillery, etc.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Norman.   From the Gibson Dictionary, the Norman was chartered
      9-30
      > Apr 1863 and 3-20 Aug 1863.  That does not mean the Norman was not
      > used in May 1863.  The vessels were frequently impressed to
      service. 
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > According to "Way's Packet Directory, the Norman was a sternwheel
      > wooden hull packet built in McKeesport, PA in 1863 for Capt CW
      > Batchelor.  Its capacity was 238 tons.  Although its
      dimensions are
      > unrecorded it is much smaller than the GW Graham . She steamed on
      the
      > Arkansas and White .  On 2 Aug 1864, the Norman collided with the
      > Lady Walton causing the loss of the Lady Walton .  The Norman burned
      > at Evansville on 21 Nov 1870.   The Lady Walton has her own story
      > for another time.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > The Norman also participated in the repositioning of Schofield's
      > XXIII Corp.  The troops boarded 52 steamboats to move from
      Paducah to
      > Annapolis.  They took the B&O Railroad to Annapolis, but it
      does not
      > state where they changed modes.  I assume Parkersburg because it had
      > a B&O Rail connection on the Ohio.  I repeat 52 steamboats. 
      If 14
      > tall stacks was "never a more glorious sight" according to the 90th IL
      > Inf chaplain, one can only imagine what he would write about
      52.  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Do you know the chaplain's name?  I would not be surprised if
      > company on the move on 9 Jun 1863 was the artillery company?!? 
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > As you are probably aware, most of the sternwheel packets built
      for
      > the Ohio and Missouri and their tributaries were built in the
      > Pittsburgh area.  Elizabeth and McKeesport are up river on the
      > Monongahela.  This design also worked well on the Tennessee and
      > Cumberland river systems.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Fran Nash
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
                           

      > >
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: "swan_pat_estelle" <pbswan@>
      > > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 2:29:04 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada
      > Eastern
      > > Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: New Book - Western Regiment
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Fran,
      > > The 90th Illinois left Memphis on June 9, 1863 on the transport G.W.
      > > Graham, part of a flotilla of 14 steamboats and their chaplain wrote
      > > that he "never saw a more glorious sight." The 90th became part of
      > > W.T. Sherman's command, which was facing Joe Johnston slightly north
      > > of Vicksburg. The 90th returned to Memphis on the Norman on September
      > > 30, 1863 and from there they marched to Chattanooga.
      > >
      > > Do you recall where you read about the 90th Illinois previously?
      > > Pat
      > >
      > > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com , fwnash@ wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
                                         

      >
      > > Feb 24
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > H'lo again.  I'm the steamboat guy.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Recently, I read a history of the Ninetieth Infantry stating the
      > > regiment
      > > >
      > > > moved in May 1863, via Memphis, down the Mississippi to
      > Vicksburg. 
      > > >
      > > > Before that time, they had been guarding railroad bridges in Cold
      > > >
      > > > Water.  The 46th IL Inf and 14th IL Inf also moved to
      Vicksburg in
      > > >
      > > > May.  Being obsessed, my interest is that on 13 May 1863
      Capt
      > > >
      > > > Thomas W Poe transported the 14th IL Inf from Memphis to
      > > >
      > > > Vicksburg.  Whether the steamer Clara Poe and her crew were
      > > >
      > > > chartered or impressed to service is unclear. 
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > What a sight!  A sternwheeler churning the water with
      its tall
      > > >
      > > > stacks spewing thunderclouds.  The ave Ohio River steamer
      > > >
      > > > was 180x30 not including its wheel.   Its
      capacity was approx
      > > >
      > > > 17 railroad cars (measured in buffalo robes from the Missouri
      > > >
      > > > River trade).  If there were 30 steamers transporting
      these troops
      > > >
      > > > and supplies, that calculates, tip to tip, more than a mile of
      > > steamboats. 
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > If you see any info on steamers in the western rivers, I would
      > > >
      > > > appreciate a shout.  BTW  Capt Poe is my ancestor.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Thanks.
      > > >
      > > > Fran Nash
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > > From: "swan_pat_estelle" <pbswan@>
      > > > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2009 1:57:11 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada
      > > Eastern
      > > > Subject: [civilwarwest] New Book - Western Regiment
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Hello,
      > > > This is to alert you to the publication of a new book on an Irish
      > > > regiment in the Western Theater of the Civil War. The only Irish
      > > > regiment in W.T. Sherman's XVth Corps, the 90th Illinois was
      > formed in
      > > > Chicago and across Northern Illinois in the late summer of 1862.
      > > > During it's first year and a half of service, it was led by Colonel
      > > > Timothy O'Meara, who was mortally wounded at Missionary Ridge. The
      > > > regiment marched for over 2600 miles over 7 Confederate states and
      > > > fought at Chattanooga, Resaca, around Atlanta, and at Ft.
      McAllister.
      > > > They even put down a riot while Columbia, SC was burning. Mustering
      > > > out in Washington, DC at the end of the war, fewer than 230 members
      > > > were able to return to Chicago to be feted by Chicago's Vicar
      General
      > > > of the Catholic Diocese and the Irish of the city. The book is
      > > > available from all book sellers and excerpts within the book can be
      > > > read at the Amazon.com site.
      > > >
      > >
      >
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