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Sternwheel Transports

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  • fwnash@comcast.net
                                                            H’lo.  Recently I became a member of your
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 28, 2009
    • 0 Attachment

                                                             

      H’lo.  Recently I became a member of your research group so I thought I should introduce myself as a

      n ancestor of the Steamboating Poe family. I fit the role of a storyteller more than a historian.

                               

      I’ve come to you searching for info and photos of 25 steamboats and their captains who carried troops and supplies on the western rivers during the Civil War and worked the Missouri River trade from 1866-1870. The captains and packets, well known to Capt Frederick Way the Ohio River historian, steamed from Georgetown, PA, a tiny borough on the Ohio River within site of West Virginia and Ohio. The steamers are also listed in the "Dictionary of Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and Sail Employed by the Union Army 1861-1868" compiled by Charles Dana Gibson and E Kay Gibson. Without these captains/pilots and steamers, the Union armies could not have taken the field, nor could they have been sustained.

       

      Their stories are fascinating. For example -- The str Kenton was owned by Capt George W Ebert who quite possibly was also one of its pilots. On Jan 12, 1863, the Kenton was moored near the mouth on the White River according to a personal letter by Lt Cushman K Davis of the 28th Wisconsin Regiment. Lt Davis was the aide-de-camp to Gen Willis Arnold Gorman. Approximately 18,000 troops had been transported to the White River from Helena or Napoleon by a fleet of 30 steamers. The Kenton steamed five difficult miles up the swollen White River on Jan 13. According to Lt Davis, the old General spent most of his time in swearing at the pilot. On Jan 15 the 28th Wisconsin was visited by a terrific snowstorm. After finding no fight on the White River, the 28th Wisconsin was ordered to Vicksburg for the purpose of another attack.

       

      Other civilian captains from Georgetown were: Thomas W Poe, Jacob Poe, Adam Poe ,Thomas S Calhoon, and Jackman T Stockdale. My packets of interest are: Amelia Poe, Clara Poe, Georgetown, Mary E Poe, Nick Wall, Belfast, Big Foot, Argyle, Belmont, Jacob Poe, Kenton, Mollie Ebert, Yorktown,

      Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...

       

      There is little data on the civilian transports whether charted or impressed into service. If you are aware of any data, I would greatly appreciate directions to it.

       

      I recently inherited a journal and some other family articles. And Capt George W Ebert, cursed by the old general, was my great great grandfather. It was not a story of my choosing, but what could make a better story.

      Fran Nash

    • Carl Williams
      30 steamers to transport 18,000 troops. Interesting, I m not used to thinking about what it really took to get that done! but of course it was a quite an
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 30, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        30 steamers to transport 18,000 troops. Interesting, I'm not used to
        thinking about what it really took to get that done! but of course it
        was a quite an undertaking.

        BTW, to avoid irritating re-formatting, save your posts as 'text only
        if you write them off-browser and then paste them in.
      • cwwgeraldd45
        2009Feb27 Dr. John T. Hunt (IL 40th Co. A) in his memoirs has some interesting information on steamboats on the Mississippi and Ohio. Of interest to me is the
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 27, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          2009Feb27

          Dr. John T. Hunt (IL 40th Co. A) in his memoirs has some interesting
          information on steamboats on the Mississippi and Ohio.

          Of interest to me is the Diana (very large)...transported the IL 40th
          from Vicksburg to Memphis (after Sept. 25, 1863)... "about Nov. 01"

          Interested in any information...photo, specifications, capt., crew.


          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, fwnash@... wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
          Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
          Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
          Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
          >
          > H’lo.  Recently I became a member of your research group so
          I thought I should introduce myself as a n a ncestor of the Steamboating
          Poe family. I fit the role of a storyteller more than a historian. n a
          ncestor of the Steamboating Poe family. I fit the role of a storyteller
          more than a historian.
          >
          > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
          Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
          >
          > I’ve come to you searching for info and photos of 25 steamboats
          and their captains who carried troops and supplies on the western rivers
          during the Civil War and worked the Missouri River trade from 1866-1870.
          The captains and packets, well known to Capt Frederick Way the Ohio
          River historian, steamed from Georgetown, PA, a tiny borough on the Ohio
          River within site of West Virginia and Ohio. The steamers are also
          listed in the "Dictionary of Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and
          Sail Employed by the Union Army 1861-1868" compiled by Charles Dana
          Gibson and E Kay Gibson. Without these captains/pilots and steamers, the
          Union armies could not have taken the field, nor could they have been
          sustained.
          >
          >
          >
          > Their stories are fascinating. For example -- The str Kenton was owned
          by Capt George W Ebert who quite possibly was also one of its
          pilots. On Jan 12, 1863, the Kenton was moored near the mouth on the
          White River according to a personal letter by Lt Cushman K Davis of the
          28th Wisconsin Regiment. Lt Davis was the aide-de-camp to Gen Willis
          Arnold Gorman. Approximately 18,000 troops had been transported to the
          White River from Helena or Napoleon by a fleet of 30 steamers. The
          Kenton steamed five difficult miles up the swollen White River on Jan
          13. According to Lt Davis, the old General spent most of his time in
          swearing at the pilot. On Jan 15 the 28th Wisconsin was visited by a
          terrific snowstorm. After finding no fight on the White River, the 28th
          Wisconsin was ordered to Vicksburg for the purpose of another attack.
          >
          >
          >
          > Other civilian captains from Georgetown were: Thomas W Poe, Jacob Poe,
          Adam Poe ,Thomas S Calhoon, and Jackman T Stockdale. My packets of
          interest are: Amelia Poe, Clara Poe, Georgetown, Mary E Poe, Nick Wall,
          Belfast, Big Foot, Argyle, Belmont, Jacob Poe, Kenton, Mollie Ebert,
          Yorktown,
          >
          > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
          >
          > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
          >
          >
          >
          > There is little data on the civilian transports whether charted or
          impressed into service. If you are aware of any data, I would greatly
          appreciate directions to it.
          >
          >
          >
          > I recently inherited a journal and some other family articles. And
          Capt George W Ebert, cursed by the old general, was my great great
          grandfather. It was not a story of my choosing, but what could make a
          better story.
          >
          > Fran Nash
          >
          > I’ve come to you searching for info and photos of 25 steamboats
          and their captains who carried troops and supplies on the western rivers
          during the Civil War and worked the Missouri River trade from 1866-1870.
          The captains and packets, well known to Capt Frederick Way the Ohio
          River historian, steamed from Georgetown, PA, a tiny borough on the Ohio
          River within site of West Virginia and Ohio. The steamers are also
          listed in the "Dictionary of Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and
          Sail Employed by the Union Army 1861-1868" compiled by Charles Dana
          Gibson and E Kay Gibson. Without these captains/pilots and steamers, the
          Union armies could not have taken the field, nor could they have been
          sustained.
          >
          >
          >
          > Their stories are fascinating. For example -- The str Kenton was owned
          by Capt George W Ebert who quite possibly was also one of its
          pilots. On Jan 12, 1863, the Kenton was moored near the mouth on the
          White River according to a personal letter by Lt Cushman K Davis of the
          28th Wisconsin Regiment. Lt Davis was the aide-de-camp to Gen Willis
          Arnold Gorman. Approximately 18,000 troops had been transported to the
          White River from Helena or Napoleon by a fleet of 30 steamers. The
          Kenton steamed five difficult miles up the swollen White River on Jan
          13. According to Lt Davis, the old General spent most of his time in
          swearing at the pilot. On Jan 15 the 28th Wisconsin was visited by a
          terrific snowstorm. After finding no fight on the White River, the 28th
          Wisconsin was ordered to Vicksburg for the purpose of another attack.
          >
          >
          >
          > Other civilian captains from Georgetown were: Thomas W Poe, Jacob Poe,
          Adam Poe ,Thomas S Calhoon, and Jackman T Stockdale. My packets of
          interest are: Amelia Poe, Clara Poe, Georgetown, Mary E Poe, Nick Wall,
          Belfast, Big Foot, Argyle, Belmont, Jacob Poe, Kenton, Mollie Ebert,
          Yorktown,
          >
          > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
          >
          > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
          >
          >
          >
          > There is little data on the civilian transports whether charted or
          impressed into service. If you are aware of any data, I would greatly
          appreciate directions to it.
          >
          >
          >
          > I recently inherited a journal and some other family articles. And
          Capt George W Ebert, cursed by the old general, was my great great
          grandfather. It was not a story of my choosing, but what could make a
          better story.
          >
          > Fran Nash
          >
        • fwnash@comcast.net
                                       Feb 27 Mr D45 There are a number of steamboats named Diana in Way s Directory.  Since you ... From:
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 27, 2009
          • 0 Attachment

                                         Feb 27

             

            Mr D45

             

            There are a number of steamboats named Diana in Way's Directory.  Since you

             


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "cwwgeraldd45" <cwwgeraldd45@...>
            To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, February 27, 2009 7:25:03 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
            Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Sternwheel Transports


            2009Feb27

            Dr. John T. Hunt (IL 40th Co. A) in his memoirs has some interesting
            information on steamboats on the Mississippi and Ohio.

            Of interest to me is the Diana (very large)...transported the IL 40th
            from Vicksburg to Memphis (after Sept. 25, 1863)... "about Nov. 01"

            Interested in any information...photo, specifications, capt., crew.

            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, fwnash@... wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
            Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
            Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
            Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
            >
            > H’lo.  Recently I became a member of your research group so
            I thought I should introduce myself as a n a ncestor of the Steamboating
            Poe family. I fit the role of a storyteller more than a historian. n a
            ncestor of the Steamboating Poe family. I fit the role of a storyteller
            more than a historian.
            >
            > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
            Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
            >
            > I’ve come to you searching for info and photos of 25 steamboats
            and their captains who carried troops and supplies on the western rivers
            during the Civil War and worked the Missouri River trade from 1866-1870.
            The captains and packets, well known to Capt Frederick Way the Ohio
            River historian, steamed from Georgetown, PA, a tiny borough on the Ohio
            River within site of West Virginia and Ohio. The steamers are also
            listed in the "Dictionary of Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and
            Sail Employed by the Union Army 1861-1868" compiled by Charles Dana
            Gibson and E Kay Gibson. Without these captains/pilots and steamers, the
            Union armies could not have taken the field, nor could they have been
            sustained.
            >
            >
            >
            > Their stories are fascinating. For example -- The str Kenton was owned
            by Capt George W Ebert who quite possibly was also one of its
            pilots. On Jan 12, 1863, the Kenton was moored near the mouth on the
            White River according to a personal letter by Lt Cushman K Davis of the
            28th Wisconsin Regiment. Lt Davis was the aide-de-camp to Gen Willis
            Arnold Gorman. Approximately 18,000 troops had been transported to the
            White River from Helena or Napoleon by a fleet of 30 steamers. The
            Kenton steamed five difficult miles up the swollen White River on Jan
            13. According to Lt Davis, the old General spent most of his time in
            swearing at the pilot. On Jan 15 the 28th Wisconsin was visited by a
            terrific snowstorm. After finding no fight on the White River, the 28th
            Wisconsin was ordered to Vicksburg for the purpose of another attack.
            >
            >
            >
            > Other civilian captains from Georgetown were: Thomas W Poe, Jacob Poe,
            Adam Poe ,Thomas S Calhoon, and Jackman T Stockdale. My packets of
            interest are: Amelia Poe, Clara Poe, Georgetown, Mary E Poe, Nick Wall,
            Belfast, Big Foot, Argyle, Belmont, Jacob Poe, Kenton, Mollie Ebert,
            Yorktown,
            >
            > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
            >
            > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
            >
            >
            >
            > There is little data on the civilian transports whether charted or
            impressed into service. If you are aware of any data, I would greatly
            appreciate directions to it.
            >
            >
            >
            > I recently inherited a journal and some other family articles. And
            Capt George W Ebert, cursed by the old general, was my great great
            grandfather. It was not a story of my choosing, but what could make a
            better story.
            >
            > Fran Nash
            >
            > I’ve come to you searching for info and photos of 25 steamboats
            and their captains who carried troops and supplies on the western rivers
            during the Civil War and worked the Missouri River trade from 1866-1870.
            The captains and packets, well known to Capt Frederick Way the Ohio
            River historian, steamed from Georgetown, PA, a tiny borough on the Ohio
            River within site of West Virginia and Ohio. The steamers are also
            listed in the "Dictionary of Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and
            Sail Employed by the Union Army 1861-1868" compiled by Charles Dana
            Gibson and E Kay Gibson. Without these captains/pilots and steamers, the
            Union armies could not have taken the field, nor could they have been
            sustained.
            >
            >
            >
            > Their stories are fascinating. For example -- The str Kenton was owned
            by Capt George W Ebert who quite possibly was also one of its
            pilots. On Jan 12, 1863, the Kenton was moored near the mouth on the
            White River according to a personal letter by Lt Cushman K Davis of the
            28th Wisconsin Regiment. Lt Davis was the aide-de-camp to Gen Willis
            Arnold Gorman. Approximately 18,000 troops had been transported to the
            White River from Helena or Napoleon by a fleet of 30 steamers. The
            Kenton steamed five difficult miles up the swollen White River on Jan
            13. According to Lt Davis, the old General spent most of his time in
            swearing at the pilot. On Jan 15 the 28th Wisconsin was visited by a
            terrific snowstorm. After finding no fight on the White River, the 28th
            Wisconsin was ordered to Vicksburg for the purpose of another attack.
            >
            >
            >
            > Other civilian captains from Georgetown were: Thomas W Poe, Jacob Poe,
            Adam Poe ,Thomas S Calhoon, and Jackman T Stockdale. My packets of
            interest are: Amelia Poe, Clara Poe, Georgetown, Mary E Poe, Nick Wall,
            Belfast, Big Foot, Argyle, Belmont, Jacob Poe, Kenton, Mollie Ebert,
            Yorktown,
            >
            > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
            >
            > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
            >
            >
            >
            > There is little data on the civilian transports whether charted or
            impressed into service. If you are aware of any data, I would greatly
            appreciate directions to it.
            >
            >
            >
            > I recently inherited a journal and some other family articles. And
            Capt George W Ebert, cursed by the old general, was my great great
            grandfather. It was not a story of my choosing, but what could make a
            better story.
            >
            > Fran Nash
            >

          • fwnash@comcast.net
                                       Feb 27 Mr D45 Not sure what happened with my premature send, but will start again.  There are two
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 27, 2009
            • 0 Attachment

                                         Feb 27

               

              Mr D45

               

              Not sure what happened with my premature send, but will start again.  There are two steamers in Way's Dictionary that match your criteria.  The biggest Diana was built by the famed Howard Ship Yards in Jeffersonville, IN.  It was a sidewheeler 275x37x7 and rated at 560 tons.  The Diana was a much bigger boat than the usual Pittsburgh area sternwheeler.   

               

              There is a photo in the UW-La Crosse Historic Steamboat Collection at the following link.

               

              http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/LaCrosseSteamboat/

               

              Browse and search for Diana.  I found no photos in the PLCHC collection.

               

              OFFICERS & CREW: Captain Edward T. Sturgeon (master); Orlando L. Smith (first clerk); John W. Forsee (second clerk); S.F. Cornell (barkeeper, 1857).

              RIVERS: Mississippi River; Ohio River; Illinois River .

              OTHER INFORMATION: Ways - 1539; Home port or owner's residence (1857), Louisville, Kentucky. Original price $15,000. Left Louisville on her maiden trip in the New Orleans trade, December 24, 1857. Ran a celebrated race with the Baltic in 1858 from New Orleans to Louisville and won. She was rewarded with a $500 prize and the right to carry U.S. mail. When the Pennsylvania exploded at Ship Island in June 1858, the Diana was at the scene and picked up survivors. When the Civil War began, she carried army supplies to Nashville, March 1862. She was sold to the U.S. Quartermasters Department while laid up at New Albany, Indiana on December 6, 1862 and saw service as a troop transport.  For a time she was the flagship of the Mississippi Marine Brigade.  Was in the Red River expedition in the spring of 1864.

               

              There are no entries for 1863.

               

              Fran Nash 

               

               

               

               

               

               


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "cwwgeraldd45" <cwwgeraldd45@...>
              To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, February 27, 2009 7:25:03 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
              Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Sternwheel Transports


              2009Feb27

              Dr. John T. Hunt (IL 40th Co. A) in his memoirs has some interesting
              information on steamboats on the Mississippi and Ohio.

              Of interest to me is the Diana (very large)...transported the IL 40th
              from Vicksburg to Memphis (after Sept. 25, 1863)... "about Nov. 01"

              Interested in any information...photo, specifications, capt., crew.

              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, fwnash@... wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
              Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
              Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
              Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
              >
              > H’lo.  Recently I became a member of your research group so
              I thought I should introduce myself as a n a ncestor of the Steamboating
              Poe family. I fit the role of a storyteller more than a historian. n a
              ncestor of the Steamboating Poe family. I fit the role of a storyteller
              more than a historian.
              >
              > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
              Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
              >
              > I’ve come to you searching for info and photos of 25 steamboats
              and their captains who carried troops and supplies on the western rivers
              during the Civil War and worked the Missouri River trade from 1866-1870.
              The captains and packets, well known to Capt Frederick Way the Ohio
              River historian, steamed from Georgetown, PA, a tiny borough on the Ohio
              River within site of West Virginia and Ohio. The steamers are also
              listed in the "Dictionary of Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and
              Sail Employed by the Union Army 1861-1868" compiled by Charles Dana
              Gibson and E Kay Gibson. Without these captains/pilots and steamers, the
              Union armies could not have taken the field, nor could they have been
              sustained.
              >
              >
              >
              > Their stories are fascinating. For example -- The str Kenton was owned
              by Capt George W Ebert who quite possibly was also one of its
              pilots. On Jan 12, 1863, the Kenton was moored near the mouth on the
              White River according to a personal letter by Lt Cushman K Davis of the
              28th Wisconsin Regiment. Lt Davis was the aide-de-camp to Gen Willis
              Arnold Gorman. Approximately 18,000 troops had been transported to the
              White River from Helena or Napoleon by a fleet of 30 steamers. The
              Kenton steamed five difficult miles up the swollen White River on Jan
              13. According to Lt Davis, the old General spent most of his time in
              swearing at the pilot. On Jan 15 the 28th Wisconsin was visited by a
              terrific snowstorm. After finding no fight on the White River, the 28th
              Wisconsin was ordered to Vicksburg for the purpose of another attack.
              >
              >
              >
              > Other civilian captains from Georgetown were: Thomas W Poe, Jacob Poe,
              Adam Poe ,Thomas S Calhoon, and Jackman T Stockdale. My packets of
              interest are: Amelia Poe, Clara Poe, Georgetown, Mary E Poe, Nick Wall,
              Belfast, Big Foot, Argyle, Belmont, Jacob Poe, Kenton, Mollie Ebert,
              Yorktown,
              >
              > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
              >
              > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
              >
              >
              >
              > There is little data on the civilian transports whether charted or
              impressed into service. If you are aware of any data, I would greatly
              appreciate directions to it.
              >
              >
              >
              > I recently inherited a journal and some other family articles. And
              Capt George W Ebert, cursed by the old general, was my great great
              grandfather. It was not a story of my choosing, but what could make a
              better story.
              >
              > Fran Nash
              >
              > I’ve come to you searching for info and photos of 25 steamboats
              and their captains who carried troops and supplies on the western rivers
              during the Civil War and worked the Missouri River trade from 1866-1870.
              The captains and packets, well known to Capt Frederick Way the Ohio
              River historian, steamed from Georgetown, PA, a tiny borough on the Ohio
              River within site of West Virginia and Ohio. The steamers are also
              listed in the "Dictionary of Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and
              Sail Employed by the Union Army 1861-1868" compiled by Charles Dana
              Gibson and E Kay Gibson. Without these captains/pilots and steamers, the
              Union armies could not have taken the field, nor could they have been
              sustained.
              >
              >
              >
              > Their stories are fascinating. For example -- The str Kenton was owned
              by Capt George W Ebert who quite possibly was also one of its
              pilots. On Jan 12, 1863, the Kenton was moored near the mouth on the
              White River according to a personal letter by Lt Cushman K Davis of the
              28th Wisconsin Regiment. Lt Davis was the aide-de-camp to Gen Willis
              Arnold Gorman. Approximately 18,000 troops had been transported to the
              White River from Helena or Napoleon by a fleet of 30 steamers. The
              Kenton steamed five difficult miles up the swollen White River on Jan
              13. According to Lt Davis, the old General spent most of his time in
              swearing at the pilot. On Jan 15 the 28th Wisconsin was visited by a
              terrific snowstorm. After finding no fight on the White River, the 28th
              Wisconsin was ordered to Vicksburg for the purpose of another attack.
              >
              >
              >
              > Other civilian captains from Georgetown were: Thomas W Poe, Jacob Poe,
              Adam Poe ,Thomas S Calhoon, and Jackman T Stockdale. My packets of
              interest are: Amelia Poe, Clara Poe, Georgetown, Mary E Poe, Nick Wall,
              Belfast, Big Foot, Argyle, Belmont, Jacob Poe, Kenton, Mollie Ebert,
              Yorktown,
              >
              > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
              >
              > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
              >
              >
              >
              > There is little data on the civilian transports whether charted or
              impressed into service. If you are aware of any data, I would greatly
              appreciate directions to it.
              >
              >
              >
              > I recently inherited a journal and some other family articles. And
              Capt George W Ebert, cursed by the old general, was my great great
              grandfather. It was not a story of my choosing, but what could make a
              better story.
              >
              > Fran Nash
              >

            • Gerald Doolen
              2009Feb28   WOW !  What a great resource, I had no idea such information was available. Info. like this makes CWW worthwhile.   Thanks very much !   p.s.-
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 28, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                2009Feb28
                 
                WOW !  What a great resource, I had no idea such information was available.
                Info. like this makes CWW worthwhile.
                 
                Thanks very much !
                 
                p.s.- Steamboats are a special interest; recently read Bissell's great book, am searching out references. Have been to Jeffersonville, IN Museum; several photos of "Queens"; Louisville Belle "sinking"; trip/photos/sound on (N.O.) Natchez @ Paducah, etc.


                --- On Sat, 2/28/09, fwnash@... <fwnash@...> wrote:

                From: fwnash@... <fwnash@...>
                Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Sternwheel Transports
                To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Saturday, February 28, 2009, 3:40 AM

                                           Feb 27
                 
                Mr D45
                 
                Not sure what happened with my premature send, but will start again.  There are two steamers in Way's Dictionary that match your criteria.  The biggest Diana was built by the famed Howard Ship Yards in Jeffersonville, IN.  It was a sidewheeler 275x37x7 and rated at 560 tons.  The Diana was a much bigger boat than the usual Pittsburgh area sternwheeler.   
                 
                There is a photo in the UW-La Crosse Historic Steamboat Collection at the following link.
                 
                 
                Browse and search for Diana.  I found no photos in the PLCHC collection.
                 
                OFFICERS & CREW: Captain Edward T. Sturgeon (master); Orlando L. Smith (first clerk); John W. Forsee (second clerk); S.F. Cornell (barkeeper, 1857).
                RIVERS: Mississippi River; Ohio River; Illinois River .
                OTHER INFORMATION: Ways - 1539; Home port or owner's residence (1857), Louisville, Kentucky. Original price $15,000. Left Louisville on her maiden trip in the New Orleans trade, December 24, 1857. Ran a celebrated race with the Baltic in 1858 from New Orleans to Louisville and won. She was rewarded with a $500 prize and the right to carry U.S. mail. When the Pennsylvania exploded at Ship Island in June 1858, the Diana was at the scene and picked up survivors. When the Civil War began, she carried army supplies to Nashville, March 1862. She was sold to the U.S. Quartermasters Department while laid up at New Albany, Indiana on December 6, 1862 and saw service as a troop transport.  For a time she was the flagship of the Mississippi Marine Brigade.  Was in the Red River expedition in the spring of 1864.
                 
                There are no entries for 1863.
                 
                Fran Nash 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "cwwgeraldd45" <cwwgeraldd45@ yahoo.com>
                To: civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Friday, February 27, 2009 7:25:03 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
                Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Sternwheel Transports


                2009Feb27

                Dr. John T. Hunt (IL 40th Co. A) in his memoirs has some interesting
                information on steamboats on the Mississippi and Ohio.

                Of interest to me is the Diana (very large)...transporte d the IL 40th
                from Vicksburg to Memphis (after Sept. 25, 1863)... "about Nov. 01"

                Interested in any information. ..photo, specifications, capt., crew.

                --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, fwnash@... wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                >
                > H’lo.  Recently I became a member of your research group so
                I thought I should introduce myself as a n a ncestor of the Steamboating
                Poe family. I fit the role of a storyteller more than a historian. n a
                ncestor of the Steamboating Poe family. I fit the role of a storyteller
                more than a historian.
                >
                > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                >
                > I’ve come to you searching for info and photos of 25 steamboats
                and their captains who carried troops and supplies on the western rivers
                during the Civil War and worked the Missouri River trade from 1866-1870.
                The captains and packets, well known to Capt Frederick Way the Ohio
                River historian, steamed from Georgetown, PA, a tiny borough on the Ohio
                River within site of West Virginia and Ohio. The steamers are also
                listed in the "Dictionary of Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and
                Sail Employed by the Union Army 1861-1868" compiled by Charles Dana
                Gibson and E Kay Gibson. Without these captains/pilots and steamers, the
                Union armies could not have taken the field, nor could they have been
                sustained.
                >
                >
                >
                > Their stories are fascinating. For example -- The str Kenton was owned
                by Capt George W Ebert who quite possibly was also one of its
                pilots. On Jan 12, 1863, the Kenton was moored near the mouth on the
                White River according to a personal letter by Lt Cushman K Davis of the
                28th Wisconsin Regiment. Lt Davis was the aide-de-camp to Gen Willis
                Arnold Gorman. Approximately 18,000 troops had been transported to the
                White River from Helena or Napoleon by a fleet of 30 steamers. The
                Kenton steamed five difficult miles up the swollen White River on Jan
                13. According to Lt Davis, the old General spent most of his time in
                swearing at the pilot. On Jan 15 the 28th Wisconsin was visited by a
                terrific snowstorm. After finding no fight on the White River, the 28th
                Wisconsin was ordered to Vicksburg for the purpose of another attack.
                >
                >
                >
                > Other civilian captains from Georgetown were: Thomas W Poe, Jacob Poe,
                Adam Poe ,Thomas S Calhoon, and Jackman T Stockdale. My packets of
                interest are: Amelia Poe, Clara Poe, Georgetown, Mary E Poe, Nick Wall,
                Belfast, Big Foot, Argyle, Belmont, Jacob Poe, Kenton, Mollie Ebert,
                Yorktown,
                >
                > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
                >
                > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
                >
                >
                >
                > There is little data on the civilian transports whether charted or
                impressed into service. If you are aware of any data, I would greatly
                appreciate directions to it.
                >
                >
                >
                > I recently inherited a journal and some other family articles. And
                Capt George W Ebert, cursed by the old general, was my great great
                grandfather. It was not a story of my choosing, but what could make a
                better story.
                >
                > Fran Nash
                >
                > I’ve come to you searching for info and photos of 25 steamboats
                and their captains who carried troops and supplies on the western rivers
                during the Civil War and worked the Missouri River trade from 1866-1870.
                The captains and packets, well known to Capt Frederick Way the Ohio
                River historian, steamed from Georgetown, PA, a tiny borough on the Ohio
                River within site of West Virginia and Ohio. The steamers are also
                listed in the "Dictionary of Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and
                Sail Employed by the Union Army 1861-1868" compiled by Charles Dana
                Gibson and E Kay Gibson. Without these captains/pilots and steamers, the
                Union armies could not have taken the field, nor could they have been
                sustained.
                >
                >
                >
                > Their stories are fascinating. For example -- The str Kenton was owned
                by Capt George W Ebert who quite possibly was also one of its
                pilots. On Jan 12, 1863, the Kenton was moored near the mouth on the
                White River according to a personal letter by Lt Cushman K Davis of the
                28th Wisconsin Regiment. Lt Davis was the aide-de-camp to Gen Willis
                Arnold Gorman. Approximately 18,000 troops had been transported to the
                White River from Helena or Napoleon by a fleet of 30 steamers. The
                Kenton steamed five difficult miles up the swollen White River on Jan
                13. According to Lt Davis, the old General spent most of his time in
                swearing at the pilot. On Jan 15 the 28th Wisconsin was visited by a
                terrific snowstorm. After finding no fight on the White River, the 28th
                Wisconsin was ordered to Vicksburg for the purpose of another attack.
                >
                >
                >
                > Other civilian captains from Georgetown were: Thomas W Poe, Jacob Poe,
                Adam Poe ,Thomas S Calhoon, and Jackman T Stockdale. My packets of
                interest are: Amelia Poe, Clara Poe, Georgetown, Mary E Poe, Nick Wall,
                Belfast, Big Foot, Argyle, Belmont, Jacob Poe, Kenton, Mollie Ebert,
                Yorktown,
                >
                > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
                >
                > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
                >
                >
                >
                > There is little data on the civilian transports whether charted or
                impressed into service. If you are aware of any data, I would greatly
                appreciate directions to it.
                >
                >
                >
                > I recently inherited a journal and some other family articles. And
                Capt George W Ebert, cursed by the old general, was my great great
                grandfather. It was not a story of my choosing, but what could make a
                better story.
                >
                > Fran Nash
                >


              • daz0463
                In the Sep 1973 issue of the S&D Refelector, the diary of Col William Rion Hoel was printed. He was in charge of the ironclad Pittsburg and participated in
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 8, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  In the Sep 1973 issue of the S&D Refelector, the diary of Col William Rion Hoel was printed. He was in charge of the ironclad Pittsburg and participated in the ill starred Red River Expedition in the spring of 1864. His diary is in the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County - Inland Rivers Library. Its entries are 2 Mar 1864 to 21 May as used in the article in the S&D Reflector. All steamboats of the expedition are ID'ed by name.

                  Sat March 12th

                  "Arrived on Simport at 1PM. Genl Smiths transports (20) arrived and his troops disembarked, about 10,000 men."

                  On average for this mission, one steamboat transported 500 troops and their equipment and supplies.

                  Fran Nash




                  --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, Gerald Doolen <cwwgeraldd45@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > 2009Feb28
                  >  
                  > WOW !  What a great resource, I had no idea such information was available.
                  > Info. like this makes CWW worthwhile.
                  >  
                  > Thanks very much !
                  >  
                  > p.s.- Steamboats are a special interest; recently read Bissell's great book, am searching out references. Have been to Jeffersonville, IN Museum; several photos of "Queens"; Louisville Belle "sinking"; trip/photos/sound on (N..O.) Natchez @ Paducah, etc.
                  >
                  >
                  > --- On Sat, 2/28/09, fwnash@... <fwnash@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > From: fwnash@... <fwnash@...>
                  > Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Sternwheel Transports
                  > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Saturday, February 28, 2009, 3:40 AM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >                            Feb 27
                  >  
                  > Mr D45
                  >  
                  > Not sure what happened with my premature send, but will start again.  There are two steamers in Way's Dictionary that match your criteria.  The biggest Diana was built by the famed Howard Ship Yards in Jeffersonville, IN.  It was a sidewheeler 275x37x7 and rated at 560 tons.  The Diana was a much bigger boat than the usual Pittsburgh area sternwheeler.   
                  >  
                  > There is a photo in the UW-La Crosse Historic Steamboat Collection at the following link.
                  >  
                  > http://digicoll. library.wisc. edu/LaCrosseStea mboat/
                  >  
                  > Browse and search for Diana.  I found no photos in the PLCHC collection.
                  >  
                  > OFFICERS & CREW: Captain Edward T. Sturgeon (master); Orlando L. Smith (first clerk); John W. Forsee (second clerk); S.F. Cornell (barkeeper, 1857).
                  > RIVERS: Mississippi River; Ohio River; Illinois River .
                  > OTHER INFORMATION: Ways - 1539; Home port or owner's residence (1857), Louisville, Kentucky. Original price $15,000. Left Louisville on her maiden trip in the New Orleans trade, December 24, 1857. Ran a celebrated race with the Baltic in 1858 from New Orleans to Louisville and won. She was rewarded with a $500 prize and the right to carry U.S. mail. When the Pennsylvania exploded at Ship Island in June 1858, the Diana was at the scene and picked up survivors. When the Civil War began, she carried army supplies to Nashville, March 1862. She was sold to the U.S. Quartermasters Department while laid up at New Albany, Indiana on December 6, 1862 and saw service as a troop transport.  For a time she was the flagship of the Mississippi Marine Brigade.  Was in the Red River expedition in the spring of 1864.
                  >  
                  > There are no entries for 1863.
                  >  
                  > Fran Nash 
                  >  
                  >  
                  >  
                  >  
                  >  
                  >  
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: "cwwgeraldd45" <cwwgeraldd45@ yahoo.com>
                  > To: civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com
                  > Sent: Friday, February 27, 2009 7:25:03 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
                  > Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Sternwheel Transports
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > 2009Feb27
                  >
                  > Dr. John T. Hunt (IL 40th Co. A) in his memoirs has some interesting
                  > information on steamboats on the Mississippi and Ohio.
                  >
                  > Of interest to me is the Diana (very large)...transporte d the IL 40th
                  > from Vicksburg to Memphis (after Sept. 25, 1863)... "about Nov. 01"
                  >
                  > Interested in any information. ..photo, specifications, capt., crew.
                  >
                  > --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, fwnash@ wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                  > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                  > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                  > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                  > >
                  > > H’lo.  Recently I became a member of your research group so
                  > I thought I should introduce myself as a n a ncestor of the Steamboating
                  > Poe family. I fit the role of a storyteller more than a historian. n a
                  > ncestor of the Steamboating Poe family. I fit the role of a storyteller
                  > more than a historian.
                  > >
                  > > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                  > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â
                  > >
                  > > I’ve come to you searching for info and photos of 25 steamboats
                  > and their captains who carried troops and supplies on the western rivers
                  > during the Civil War and worked the Missouri River trade from 1866-1870.
                  > The captains and packets, well known to Capt Frederick Way the Ohio
                  > River historian, steamed from Georgetown, PA, a tiny borough on the Ohio
                  > River within site of West Virginia and Ohio. The steamers are also
                  > listed in the "Dictionary of Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and
                  > Sail Employed by the Union Army 1861-1868" compiled by Charles Dana
                  > Gibson and E Kay Gibson. Without these captains/pilots and steamers, the
                  > Union armies could not have taken the field, nor could they have been
                  > sustained.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Their stories are fascinating. For example -- The str Kenton was owned
                  > by Capt George W Ebert who quite possibly was also one of its
                  > pilots. On Jan 12, 1863, the Kenton was moored near the mouth on the
                  > White River according to a personal letter by Lt Cushman K Davis of the
                  > 28th Wisconsin Regiment. Lt Davis was the aide-de-camp to Gen Willis
                  > Arnold Gorman. Approximately 18,000 troops had been transported to the
                  > White River from Helena or Napoleon by a fleet of 30 steamers. The
                  > Kenton steamed five difficult miles up the swollen White River on Jan
                  > 13. According to Lt Davis, the old General spent most of his time in
                  > swearing at the pilot. On Jan 15 the 28th Wisconsin was visited by a
                  > terrific snowstorm. After finding no fight on the White River, the 28th
                  > Wisconsin was ordered to Vicksburg for the purpose of another attack.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Other civilian captains from Georgetown were: Thomas W Poe, Jacob Poe,
                  > Adam Poe ,Thomas S Calhoon, and Jackman T Stockdale. My packets of
                  > interest are: Amelia Poe, Clara Poe, Georgetown, Mary E Poe, Nick Wall,
                  > Belfast, Big Foot, Argyle, Belmont, Jacob Poe, Kenton, Mollie Ebert,
                  > Yorktown,
                  > >
                  > > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
                  > >
                  > > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > There is little data on the civilian transports whether charted or
                  > impressed into service. If you are aware of any data, I would greatly
                  > appreciate directions to it.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > I recently inherited a journal and some other family articles. And
                  > Capt George W Ebert, cursed by the old general, was my great great
                  > grandfather. It was not a story of my choosing, but what could make a
                  > better story.
                  > >
                  > > Fran Nash
                  > >
                  > > I’ve come to you searching for info and photos of 25 steamboats
                  > and their captains who carried troops and supplies on the western rivers
                  > during the Civil War and worked the Missouri River trade from 1866-1870.
                  > The captains and packets, well known to Capt Frederick Way the Ohio
                  > River historian, steamed from Georgetown, PA, a tiny borough on the Ohio
                  > River within site of West Virginia and Ohio. The steamers are also
                  > listed in the "Dictionary of Transports and Combatant Vessels Steam and
                  > Sail Employed by the Union Army 1861-1868" compiled by Charles Dana
                  > Gibson and E Kay Gibson. Without these captains/pilots and steamers, the
                  > Union armies could not have taken the field, nor could they have been
                  > sustained.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Their stories are fascinating. For example -- The str Kenton was owned
                  > by Capt George W Ebert who quite possibly was also one of its
                  > pilots. On Jan 12, 1863, the Kenton was moored near the mouth on the
                  > White River according to a personal letter by Lt Cushman K Davis of the
                  > 28th Wisconsin Regiment. Lt Davis was the aide-de-camp to Gen Willis
                  > Arnold Gorman. Approximately 18,000 troops had been transported to the
                  > White River from Helena or Napoleon by a fleet of 30 steamers. The
                  > Kenton steamed five difficult miles up the swollen White River on Jan
                  > 13. According to Lt Davis, the old General spent most of his time in
                  > swearing at the pilot. On Jan 15 the 28th Wisconsin was visited by a
                  > terrific snowstorm. After finding no fight on the White River, the 28th
                  > Wisconsin was ordered to Vicksburg for the purpose of another attack.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Other civilian captains from Georgetown were: Thomas W Poe, Jacob Poe,
                  > Adam Poe ,Thomas S Calhoon, and Jackman T Stockdale. My packets of
                  > interest are: Amelia Poe, Clara Poe, Georgetown, Mary E Poe, Nick Wall,
                  > Belfast, Big Foot, Argyle, Belmont, Jacob Poe, Kenton, Mollie Ebert,
                  > Yorktown,
                  > >
                  > > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
                  > >
                  > > Sallie, John C Fremont, Ida Stockdale, Katie Stockdale...
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > There is little data on the civilian transports whether charted or
                  > impressed into service. If you are aware of any data, I would greatly
                  > appreciate directions to it.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > I recently inherited a journal and some other family articles. And
                  > Capt George W Ebert, cursed by the old general, was my great great
                  > grandfather. It was not a story of my choosing, but what could make a
                  > better story.
                  > >
                  > > Fran Nash
                  > >
                  >
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