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Re: North of Jackson Mississippi

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  • William H Keene
    ... Reservior is only a few miles away. These skirmishings were taken place after the fall of Vicksburg right ? Right. During the siege of Vicksburg, Gen
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 26, 2008
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, John LaPorta
      <captaininmississippi@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thank you very much William . I have heard of Grants Ferry and the
      Reservior is only a few miles away. These skirmishings were taken
      place after the fall of Vicksburg right ?

      Right. During the siege of Vicksburg, Gen Johnston had gathered an
      army to attempt to come to the aid of Vicksburg. After the surrender
      of Vicksburg, Grant sent Sherman with an army-sized force to go after
      Johnston. Johnston fell back to Jackson, where Sherman tried to
      besiege him. Sherman received a report on the 15th of July that a
      large confederate cavalry force had crossed the Pearl at Grant's Ferry
      in order to get in his rear. On the 16th Sherman sent an infantry
      brigade and a cavalry brigade north from Jackson to try to drive the
      Confederates back. The expedition skirmished with the Confederate
      cavalry squadron guarding the river crossing, driving it off and then
      destroying the ferry boats.
    • William Nolan
      If the Union force drove off the Confederate Cavalry, why would they burn the ferry and boats. It sounds more like they were preventing the cavalry from
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 27, 2008
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        If the Union force drove off the Confederate Cavalry, why would they burn the ferry and boats. It sounds more like they were preventing the cavalry from crossing. I agree that the Confederate force was not large enough to challange the Union force, but it did operate along the Black, around Yazoo City, Clanton and Jackson without being stopped. Even in 1864 when Sheridan moved to Meridian, he lost his cavalry support which was chassed back to Memphis by Forrest. The Whitifield Ross Cavalry Brigade contested Sherman, but was completely outmanned. Johnston did not conduct a headon battle because of his dwindling resources. But Sherman paid dearly for each skirmish. Later on his drive to Atlanta he lost 35,000 men. Had the Confederates had the forces to expend, Sherman might not have made Atlanta.


        From: William H Keene <wh_keene@...>
        To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, October 26, 2008 10:06:15 PM
        Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: North of Jackson Mississippi

        --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, John LaPorta
        <captaininmississip pi@...> wrote:

        >
        > Thank you very much William . I have heard of Grants Ferry and the
        Reservior is only a few miles away. These skirmishings were taken
        place after the fall of Vicksburg right ?

        Right. During the siege of Vicksburg, Gen Johnston had gathered an
        army to attempt to come to the aid of Vicksburg. After the surrender
        of Vicksburg, Grant sent Sherman with an army-sized force to go after
        Johnston. Johnston fell back to Jackson, where Sherman tried to
        besiege him. Sherman received a report on the 15th of July that a
        large confederate cavalry force had crossed the Pearl at Grant's Ferry
        in order to get in his rear. On the 16th Sherman sent an infantry
        brigade and a cavalry brigade north from Jackson to try to drive the
        Confederates back. The expedition skirmished with the Confederate
        cavalry squadron guarding the river crossing, driving it off and then
        destroying the ferry boats.

      • keeno2@aol.com
        If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, we d all have a marvelous Christmas. **************Play online games for FREE at Games.com! All of your favorites, no
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 27, 2008
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          If "ifs and buts" were candy and nuts, we'd all have a marvelous Christmas.



        • Peterson, Jack N.
          I think its clear that Sherman s forces were clearly irresistible when led with esprit as Sherman did. Johnston did a magnificent job delaying the inevitable,
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 27, 2008
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            I think its clear that Sherman ’s forces were clearly irresistible when led with esprit as Sherman did.  Johnston did a magnificent job delaying the inevitable, but Davis could not tolerate what was being viewed by too many confederates as a losing continual retreat and Johnston had to go.  Hood’s tactics were a disaster and compounded when he retreated toward Nashville rather than moving to Lee.  Prior to the Atlanta campaign, Sherman and Grant discussed options such as leaving Atlanta besieged and splitting Sherman ’s army to move south to either Mobile , Pensacola or on to Savannah .  The rebels simply had no force available to rescue Atlanta as long as Grant kept up the pressure on Lee.  Davis may have had some leverage for settlement during the fall of ’63.  And maybe as late as the summer of ’64 when the cost of the Wilderness campaign became clear to the pro-peace factions in the North.  But, after appointing Grant,  Lincoln seemed ready to fight until Lee was destroyed no matter the cost.

             


            From: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com [mailto: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of William Nolan
            Sent: Monday, October 27, 2008 2:16 PM
            To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Re: North of Jackson Mississippi

             

            If the Union force drove off the Confederate Cavalry, why would they burn the ferry and boats. It sounds more like they were preventing the cavalry from crossing. I agree that the Confederate force was not large enough to challange the Union force, but it did operate along the Black, around Yazoo City , Clanton and Jackson without being stopped. Even in 1864 when Sheridan moved to Meridian , he lost his cavalry support which was chassed back to Memphis by Forrest. The Whitifield Ross Cavalry Brigade contested Sherman , but was completely outmanned. Johnston did not conduct a headon battle because of his dwindling resources. But Sherman paid dearly for each skirmish. Later on his drive to Atlanta he lost 35,000 men. Had the Confederates had the forces to expend, Sherman might not have made Atlanta .

             


            From: William H Keene <wh_keene@yahoo. com>
            To: civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com
            Sent: Sunday, October 26, 2008 10:06:15 PM
            Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: North of Jackson Mississippi

            --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, John LaPorta
            <captaininmississip pi@...> wrote:

            >
            > Thank you very much William . I have heard of Grants Ferry and the
            Reservior is only a few miles away. These skirmishings were taken
            place after the fall of Vicksburg right ?

            Right. During the siege of Vicksburg , Gen Johnston had gathered an
            army to attempt to come to the aid of Vicksburg . After the surrender
            of Vicksburg , Grant sent Sherman with an army-sized force to go after
            Johnston . Johnston fell back to Jackson , where Sherman tried to
            besiege him. Sherman received a report on the 15th of July that a
            large confederate cavalry force had crossed the Pearl at Grant's Ferry
            in order to get in his rear. On the 16th Sherman sent an infantry
            brigade and a cavalry brigade north from Jackson to try to drive the
            Confederates back. The expedition skirmished with the Confederate
            cavalry squadron guarding the river crossing, driving it off and then
            destroying the ferry boats.

          • William H Keene
            ... burn the ferry and boats. It sounds more like they were preventing the cavalry from crossing. ... Exactly -- the squadron that was there was just
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 27, 2008
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              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, William Nolan
              <sixtxcavrgtcsa@...> wrote:
              >
              > If the Union force drove off the Confederate Cavalry, why would they
              burn the ferry and boats. It sounds more like they were preventing the
              cavalry from crossing. ...

              Exactly -- the squadron that was there was just protecting the
              crossing for use by the main confederate cavalry force. Destroying
              the boats, etc was a way of stopping the Confederates from using that
              crossing.
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