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1st/3rd Ky Cav. Vol. CSA

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  • Abordo
    Dear List Members, Hello! As a new member, I am hoping am hoping to make aquaintance with others who are researching the history of the 1st/3rd Kentucky
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 6, 2008
      Dear List Members,
       
      Hello! As a new member, I am hoping  am hoping to make aquaintance with others who are researching the history of the 1st/3rd Kentucky Cavalry (CSA). 
       
      With the original 12 month enlistment period ending in the Autumn of 1862, the 1st was reorganized into the 3rd. They were in Lexington, KY by 10 September 1862 with Brig. Gen. Abraham Buford taking enlistments. Later, they appear to have covered the withdrawal (CSA) after the battle of Perryville.
       
      Interesting aside, General Buford, was a native ofKentucky . Buford had attended West Point and served in the Mexican War yet, he did not cut the figure of a dashing cavalryman. Buford was older, and a very large, weighing 320 pounds. He was hardly the sort of man one could envision astride a galloping horse! When the Civil War erupted Buford was retired from military service, living happily as a horse and cattle breeder. He publicly maintained a position of neutrality until Bragg’s invasion of Kentucky . Back in uniform, Buford had just been made a Brigadier General on September 2, 1862 .[i] .
       
      Perhaps a list member could direct me to archives should this topic have already have been discussed and exhausted.
       
      With gratitude,
       
      Mary Beth
       
       
       
       


      [i] Stewart Sifakis, “Who Was Who In the Confederacy,” Volume II of Who Was Who In the Civil War p. 41

    • Carl Williams
      new to me there s this: 3rd Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry 3rd Cavalry Regiment was organized during the summer of 1862. In October the 1st Kentucky Cavalry
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 7, 2008
        new to me

        there's this:

        3rd Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry

        3rd Cavalry Regiment was organized during the summer of 1862. In
        October the 1st Kentucky Cavalry Regiment merged into this command and
        at times was called the 1st (3rd) Kentucky Cavalry. It was assigned to
        Buford's, T.Harrison's, J.W. Grigsby's, J.S. Williams', and J.H.
        Lewis' Brigade, and skirmished in numerous actions in Tennessee,
        Kentucky, and Georgia. Later the unit was active in the Atlanta
        Campaign, the defense of Savannah, and the campaign of the Carolinas.
        It surrendered with the Army of Tennessee in April, 1865. The field
        commanders were Colonel J.R. Butler, Lieutenant Colonels Jack Allen
        and Jacob W. Griffith, and Major J.Q. Chenoweth.

        from:
        http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/regiments.cfm
      • Abordo
        Thank you very much for your efforts on my behalf! My connection to the 1st/ 3rd lies with my 2nd great-grand, James Edward Evans, who joined the 1st/3rd KY
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 7, 2008
          Thank you very much for your efforts on my behalf!
           

          My connection to the 1st/ 3rd lies with my 2nd great-grand,  James Edward Evans, who joined the 1st/3rd KY Cavalry CSA as the enlistment period for the original members (12 months) expired. The 1st was then reorganized into the 3rd. Due to a SNAFU the 3rd was re-designated as the 7th after the wars conclusion. (Please forgive me for sounding so confusing, but alas the facts here are rather messy!) James Edward Evans enlisted inLexington , KY for a period of three years. He was enlisted by Brig. Gen. Abraham Buford and became a member of J. Russell Butler’s 3rd Kentucky Cavalry.[i] This Company was patrolling roads near Versailles and then covered the withdraw into Tennessee after Perryville. As the Confederate Army retreated from Kentucky, J. Russell Butler’s 3rd Kentucky and D. Howard Smith’s 5th Kentucky were positioned at Mershon’s Cross Roads near Wild Cat Mountain .[ii] Union General Charles Cruft’s Brigade encountered the 1st and 3rd Tennessee and 3rd and 5th Kentucky as they came down Winding Blade Road . A skirmish ensued and the Confederates were forced to retreat toward Raccoon Creek.[iii] For undocumented reasons , from 1 November 1862 – 28 February 1863 James Edward Evans was absent without leave from Capt. H. C. Myres’ Co. , Butler ’s Regiment, 3rd Kentucky Cavalry.[iv] Whether he became separated from his Company during the retreat form Mershon’s Crossroads, chose to leave his unit for personal reasons, or went home when faced with freezing weather, lack of food and lack of shelter is unknown. It is entirely possible that James Edward Evans, like many other Kentuckians of the period, wished only to fight what he considered the Federal invasion of his native soil. There simply isn’t enough evidence to determine what motivations were in play. Official records are woefully scant. The following is the first and only roll of Company I of the 1st/ 3rd Regiment Cavalry, Kentucky Volunteers. They had reorganized as the enlistment period of the original members of the Company expired.

          “Roll of Company I, First Regiment Cavalry, Kentucky Volunteers, Confederate States Army, Reorganization – Consolidated First and Third Regiments

           #27 Evans, J. Rank Private, When Enlisted Sep 10, 1863, Where Enlisted Lexington, KY

          NOTE The only roll of this company on file is dated November 1, 1862 to February 28, 1863[v]

          It is also possible that the roll is in error. James Edward Evans may not have been absent. He may have already been transferred to another Company and Regiment within the Department of Eastern Tennessee.

           

           A roll datelined February 13, 1863 , McMinnville , Tennessee reads, “In September, 1862, the company (then known as Company “G,” Forrest’s Regiment) had been captured at Fort Donelson, together with horses, equipment, etc., and was exchanged at Vicksburg, Miss.; proceeded thence to Knoxville, Tenn., and were ordered to report to General John H. Morgan, at Murfreesboro, Tenn.: acted accordingly and were assigned to Gano’s Regiment  of Morgan’s Cavalry. Since being connected with that command, the company has accompanied it into Kentucky and returned with loss of four men, as reported on the rolls. NOTE – Previous to the surrender at Fort Donelson this company was serving as Company “G,” Forrest’s 3rd Tennessee Cavalry.”

          ROLL OF COMPANY I, SEVENTH REGIMENT CAVALRY, KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS, CONFEDERATE STATES ARMY,  #31 Evans, James,  Rank : Private, When Enlisted: Sept. 7, 1862, Where Enlisted: Danville, Ky”[vi]

           

          On the Roll of Company F, 7th Regiment Kentucky Volunteers, C. S. A., twenty eight names are noted as “Member Company ‘E’ 3rd KY Cavalry; attached.”[vii] James Edward Evans’ path from 1st to 3rd to 7th becomes even clearer when one notes that six former members of Company I, 1st Regiment Cavalry (Edward Brown, W. Dickerson, James Evans, John Gray, R. H. Harmon, and S. O’Bannon) became members of Company I, 7th Regiment Cavalry.[viii] Thus, as during the Civil War the 7th was known as the 3rd, the mystery of why the Compiled Military Service Records of James Edward Evans continued to reflect him as being with the 3rd  Kentucky is solved.

           

          On 3 March 1863 James Edward Evans was wounded.[ix] I have yet to locate any document that explains the nature of this wound. (Any lead most gratefully accepted!) It appears not to have been too serious as James Edward Evans was among the cavalrymen Pegram lead on the ill-fated Kentucky raid. They encountered and skirmished with Yankees on March 28th at Hickman’s Bridge. Then, narrowly evading the closely following 44th and 45th Regiments Ohio Infantry, Pegram’s Calvary captured about 750 cattle. They had taken 537 of the cattle across the Cumberland River when their luck ran out. James Edward Evans was captured by Union forces on March 30, 1863 in Somerset , Kentucky , during the Dutton's Hill Battle.[x]  Now a prisoner of war, he was taken to Louisville and held at the military prison.  On April 13, 1863 he was processed to be sent to City Point , Virginia by way of Fort McHenry , Baltimore , Maryland . This travel would have been done by railroad, usually in unheated cars.  James Edward Evans was paroled at Fort Monroe , Virginia on April 21, 1863 .  He was exchanged under the terms of the Dix-Hill Cartel with in a group of 527 Confederate Prisoners of War and one surgeon on April 22, 1863 at City Point , Virginia . The surgeon’s name was J. H. Thompson.[xi]

           

          The story resumes with James Edward Evans rejoining his company and riding on the Great Raid.  (I’ve the names of all 71 men in Co. I should you wish them. It only seems fitting to mention his comrades by name in retelling this tale.)  He was captured in Cheshire , Gallia County , Ohio on July 20, 1863 , He was sent to Cincinnati , Ohio . On July 26, 1863 he was moved by steamboat to Camp Chase , near Columbus , Ohio .[xii] On August 20, 1863 James Evans was put aboard a railway car and  moved to Camp Douglas in Chicago , Illinois . Here he languished for a year and a half as the Dix- Hill Cartel general exchange agreement had collapsed in July of 1863.[xiii]

           

          On 2 March 1865 , James Edward Evans was transferred to Point Lookout to await exchange.[xiv] Joseph M. Dunavan, who composed “Twas a Pleasant Home of Ours Sister,” and Curtis R. Burke whose diary entries shed much light on the life of prisoners at Camp Douglas were also in this group. Over 1,000 prisoners of war were paroled for exchange at Fort Delaware in February 1865. Another group of similar size were paroled in March 1865. The collapse of the Confederate defenses of Richmond on April 2, 1865 resulted in the loss of many exchange records, including those of James Edward Evans. However, it appears very likely that James was among those in the second exchange who were delivered to Confederate authorities at Bouleware’s and Cox’s Wharves on the James River, Virginia, March 10 -12 1865. [xv]

           

          James Edward Evans, as many of the surviving members of Morgan’s Raiders, chose to become part of Duke’s Brigade.  As you well know,Basil W. Duke was John Hunt Morgan’s brother-in-law and chief lieutenant. Most of the men in Duke’s Brigade had served under John Hunt Morgan during the Great Raid. These men escorted President Jefferson Davis and the Confederate Treasury through Georgia. On May 8, 1865, the remnants of Duke’s Cavalry Brigade gathered for their last muster in Woodstock, Georgia.  The unit, containing about 100 men, was ordered to surrender at Washington , Georgia , on May 11, 1865 . James Edward Evans became a prisoner of war for a third time. He was transported to Nashville , Tennessee where he swore an Oath of Allegiance on May 22, 1865 ending his CSA service. His description was recorded as fair complexion, dark hair, hazel eyes, 5 feet, 10 inches tall. [xvi]

           

          Thank you very much for considering my desire for futher information and coming to my assistance,

           

          Mary Beth


          [i] Compiled Military Service Record of James Edward Evans

          [ii] “War of Rebellion, Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies” Washington : Government Printing Office 1890 Vol. 16 II, p. 971

          [iii] Kenneth A Hafendorfer, “They Died By Twos and Tens” 1995 p. 834-835 and 838-839

          [iv] Compiled Military Service Record for James Edward Evans

          [v] McDowell, “The Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky ”, Civil War, Confederate, Vol. I p. 528 - 530

          [vi]  McDowell, “The Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky, Civil War, Confederate”, Vol. I  pgs 710 -713

          [vii] McDowell, “The Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky, Civil War, Confederate”, Vol. I  pgs 700 -705

          [viii] McDowell, “The Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky, Civil War, Confederate”, Vol. I  pgs 528 -529 and 710 -713

          [ix] Drs. Elizabeth and Dwight G. Watkins, “ Morgan’s Light Brigade” Alphabetical Roll of Morgan’s Old Division Through 1863 pages 234 -235

          [x] Compiled Military Service Record of James Edward Evans 1862 – 1865

          [xi] Compiled Military Service Record of James Edward Evans 1862 – 1865

          [xii] Compiled Military Service Record of James Edward Evans 1862 – 1865

          [xiii] Compiled Military Service Record of James Edward Evans 1862 – 1865

          [xiv] Compiled Military Service Record of James Edward Evans 1862 – 1865

          [xv] Compiled Military Service Record of James Edward Evans 1862 - 1865

          [xvi] Compiled Military Service Record of James Edward Evans 1862 - 1865

        • John LaPorta
          Welcome Marybeth, This site is awsome I`ve learned sooo much.. thanks to all here !! John... the captain in Mississippi ... From: Abordo
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 11, 2008
            Welcome Marybeth,
            This site is awsome I`ve learned sooo much.. thanks to all here !!
            John... the captain in Mississippi

            --- On Sat, 9/6/08, Abordo <rama@...> wrote:
            From: Abordo <rama@...>
            Subject: [civilwarwest] 1st/3rd Ky Cav. Vol. CSA
            To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, September 6, 2008, 11:23 AM

            Dear List Members,
             
            Hello! As a new member, I am hoping  am hoping to make aquaintance with others who are researching the history of the 1st/3rd Kentucky Cavalry (CSA). 
             
            With the original 12 month enlistment period ending in the Autumn of 1862, the 1st was reorganized into the 3rd. They were in Lexington, KY by 10 September 1862 with Brig. Gen. Abraham Buford taking enlistments. Later, they appear to have covered the withdrawal (CSA) after the battle of Perryville.
             
            Interesting aside, General Buford, was a native of Kentucky . Buford had attended West Point and served in the Mexican War yet, he did not cut the figure of a dashing cavalryman. Buford was older, and a very large, weighing 320 pounds. He was hardly the sort of man one could envision astride a galloping horse! When the Civil War erupted Buford was retired from military service, living happily as a horse and cattle breeder. He publicly maintained a position of neutrality until Bragg’s invasion of Kentucky . Back in uniform, Buford had just been made a Brigadier General on September 2, 1862 .[i] .
             
            Perhaps a list member could direct me to archives should this topic have already have been discussed and exhausted.
             
            With gratitude,
             
            Mary Beth
             
             
             
             


            [i] Stewart Sifakis, “Who Was Who In the Confederacy,” Volume II of Who Was Who In the Civil War p. 41


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