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RE: [civilwarwest] Re: Campaign

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  • Nick KURTZ
    The modern military defines a campaign as: A campaign is a phase of a war involving a series of operations related in time and space and aimed towards a
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 7, 2008
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      The modern military defines a campaign as:
      "A campaign is a phase of a war involving a series of operations related in
      time and space and aimed towards a single, specific, strategic objective or
      result in the war. A campaign may include a single battle, but more often it
      comprises a number of battles over a protracted period of time or a
      considerable distance, but within a single theatre of operations or
      delimited area. A campaign may last only a few weeks, but usually lasts
      several months or even a year." From Trevor Dupuy.



      >From: Tom Gilbert <tommygeebassman@...>
      >Reply-To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      >To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Campaign
      >Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 11:34:48 -0700 (PDT)
      >
      >Hello Dick and all ..� when I was teaching my Gettysburg course, I began it
      >on Jun 2, 1863 (actually even earlier than that)�and carried it through
      >(and a ways beyond)�July 14 (as I'm�sure everyone knows, even
      >though�"Gettysburg" is out of our realm, the "official" battle days were
      >July 1-3) .. the events leading up to a battle and those following go a
      >long way to help describe the battle itself .. example (if I may continue
      >with Gettysburg only as an example), a study of the campaign reveals why
      >Lee and�the ANV approached from the north and west while Meade and the AoP
      >came in from the south and east .. plus you get exposed to some wonderful
      >little jewels, such as Meade's Pipe Creek Plan, which, after Dick shared a
      >lot of info with me about, became an intregal part of my course ..... Tom
      >Gilbert
      >
      >--- On Wed, 8/6/08, Dick Weeks <shotgun@...> wrote:
      >
      >From: Dick Weeks <shotgun@...>
      >Subject: Re: [SPAM][civilwarwest] New Stone's River Title
      >To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
      >Date: Wednesday, August 6, 2008, 5:10 PM
      >
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      >No I haven't Mike.� However, it seems like it might be interesting.� I have
      >never really thought about Stone's River (Murfreesboro) as being a campaign
      >but�I will certainly look at it.� By the way, this brings up another
      >question.� What makes something a battle or campaign?� I can understand
      >Jackson's Valley Campaign but I have also heard Gettysburg (not trying to
      >get into the Eastern Theater here) referred to as the Gettysburg Campaign.�
      >I know that Coddington refers� to it as the "Gettysburg Campaign".� I would
      >suppose it is the�actions leading up to the major battle and then the
      >retreat from the battle might constitute a "campaign."�� Also it may be the
      >dates involved with the overall action.� Any thoughts on this anyone?
      >�
      >I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
      >Dick (a.k.a. Shotgun)
      >http://www.civilwar home.com
      >
      >----- Original Message -----
      >From: NPeters102@aol. com
      >To: civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com
      >Sent: Wednesday, August 06, 2008 4:09 PM
      >Subject: [SPAM][civilwarwest ] New Stone's River Title
      >
      >
      >Anyone�read "The Stone's River Campaign: 26 December 1862-5 January 1863
      >(The Union Army),"�by Lanny Kelton Smith?
      >�
      >Respectfully,
      >
      >Mike Peters
      >npeters102@aol. com
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