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Re: General Shelby and Maximillian

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  • Carl Williams
    Pretty good book to read, so far. Not an uninterrupted string of dubious statements, in other words. But another assertion that I will have to check out,
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 14, 2008
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      Pretty good book to read, so far. Not an uninterrupted string of
      dubious statements, in other words. But another assertion that I will
      have to check out, though, is that Lincoln and advisors , hoping for a
      "new war" that would unite all Americans, did not oppose Shelby's
      cavalry going into Mexico well armed. Supposedly stopped Sheridan from
      interfering for that reason. The assumption being that Shelby would
      agree to cooperate with the "republican" forces trying to get rid of
      Maximillian.

      all this was an opening teaser, though... I have to get further into
      the book to get more on that
    • guitarmandanga
      Uh...are we talking about the same thing here? ... some ... in The ... the ... abandoned it ... pointed ... for ... majority ... arms ... likely ... sort of
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 14, 2008
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        Uh...are we talking about the same thing here?

        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > INteresting that this seems to have been a well circulated myth.
        > Historians would certainly know it was wrong, so probably survived
        > with other writers like this author.
        >
        > Sometimes shows its age ... written in 1954 by a Richmond writer,
        some
        > statements aren't too PC for today. But readability is good.
        >
        > > William C. Davis mentioned a figure like this in an essay
        in "The
        > > Cause Lost: Myths and Realities of the Confederacy", concerning
        the
        > > Trans-Mississippi Theater. The argument he was addressing was
        > > whether or not the Confederacy could---or should---have
        abandoned it
        > > and at least attempteded to move these forces east of the
        > > Mississippi to help with the more decisive campaigns. He
        pointed
        > > out that, of the 60,000 men, likely less than half were present
        for
        > > duty, and of the remaining 30,000, even assuming that the
        majority
        > > of them would have wanted to leave to help their comrades in
        arms
        > > across the River---a far-from-foregone conclusion---the means to
        > > concentrate them effectively into a large fighting force, even
        > > within the Trans-MS, were simply not there (very little
        > > infrastructure, almost no consolidation of supply departments,
        > > etc.), to say nothing of trying to get them into Mississippi or
        > > Louisiana. Plus there was the political fallout that would
        likely
        > > have resulted from this sort of "abandonment". So they were
        sort of
        > > stuck: they had a sizeable army in the Trans-MS in terms of
        numbers,
        > > but they couldn't bring it altogether in one place for a
        campaign
        > > there, nor could they move it elsewhere.
        > >
        >
      • Carl Williams
        I think so. I have gone back to referring to the book that quoted the 60,000 man army bit; you may have missed that original message, and of course it is bad
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 15, 2008
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          I think so. I have gone back to referring to the book that quoted the
          60,000 man army bit; you may have missed that original message, and of
          course it is bad form on my part not to make it clear what I am
          referring to, sorry.

          That book is "General Jo Shelby: Undefeated Rebel" by Daniel O'Flaherty

          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "guitarmandanga"
          <iceman1977_01@...> wrote:
          >
          > Uh...are we talking about the same thing here?
          >
        • William H Keene
          ... Sounds right for the entire force in the Trans-Miss, including all garrisons and subcommands. In the spring of 1864, the number was 41,000 as enumerated
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 15, 2008
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            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > well, if we've slowed down a bit, reading a book about Shelby and
            > looks like will be able to post here some stuff. ["General Jo Shelby:
            > Undefeated Rebel"]
            >
            > Already have come across a statement that I'll have to check out: a
            > claim that the CS Army of the Trans-miss was 60,000 strong at its
            > peak. That sound right?


            Sounds right for the entire force in the Trans-Miss, including all
            garrisons and subcommands. In the spring of 1864, the number was
            41,000 as enumerated by Steven Newton in the book "Lost For The
            Cause". Problem was that the force was so widely distributed that
            around 15,000 was the most ever brought into any battle in the tRans-
            Miss.
          • Carl Williams
            Reading Jo Shelby, Undefeated Rebel, now adding to the list of I didn t know that is Shelby s capture of the QUEEN CITY tinclad, reminiscent of some of
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 1, 2008
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              Reading "Jo Shelby, Undefeated Rebel," now adding to the list of "I
              didn't know that" is Shelby's capture of the QUEEN CITY tinclad,
              reminiscent of some of Forrest's feats (I always enjoy reading about
              the surprise capture of Fed gunboats).

              here is an account:
              http://tinyurl.com/2vaarf

              see also:
              http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-q/quen-cty.htm

              Seems the White River in Arkansas was an unlucky place for the Union
              Navy, they also lost the City Class MOUND CITY there IIRC.
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