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Re: books

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  • James W. Durney
    We seem to be in a position where most books are due in 2008. I am looking forward to: Scheduled for publication in January is The Maryland Campaign of
    Message 1 of 109 , Dec 12, 2007
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      We seem to be in a position where most books are due in 2008. I am
      looking forward to:
      Scheduled for publication in January is "The Maryland Campaign of
      September 1862: Ezra A. Carman's Definitive Study of the Union and
      Confederate Armies at Antietam" Joseph Pierro Editor. Ezra Carman
      did the research for Antietam and left a 1,700+ page handwritten
      manuscript. The manuscript has been used by scholars for almost one
      hundred years when writing about the battle. For the first time, the
      manuscript will be available to the public.
      "How the South Could Have Won the Civil War: The Fatal Errors That
      Led to Confederate Defeat" by Bevin Alexander. The author has
      written several "what if" and general histories. He presents a
      number of key points where the South failed to take full advantage of
      the situation or made the wrong decision.
      "MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT E RODES OF THE ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA: A
      Biography" by Darrell L. Collins. This is the first biography of the
      man considered the best division commander in the AoNV by many of his
      contemporaries. The author has an impressive resume of books on the
      AoNV.

      Scheduled for publication in February is "The Artillery of
      Gettysburg" by Bradley M. Gottfried. Any book on Gettysburg by
      Bradley Gottfried is not to be ignored. His Brigades and Maps books
      are excellent and needed by every serious student of this battle.

      Schedule for publication in March is "Roll Call to Destiny: The
      Soldier's Eye View of Civil War Battles" by Brent Nosworthy. He is
      the author of the well received "The Bloody Crucible of Courage:
      Fighting Methods and Combat Experience of the Civil War". This book
      continues and expands on how troops actually fought.
    • James W. Durney
      ... I don t think it was possible to find a way to ship 10,000 men across the Mississippi in 1864. Even if their was, I fail to see how the CSA would have
      Message 109 of 109 , Dec 12, 2007
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        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "derylsellm" <gsandds@...> wrote:
        >
        > The title "How the South Could Have Won the Civil War: The Fatal
        > Errors That Led to Confederate Defeat" strikes a nerve with me. It
        > seems the fate of the Confederacy in 1864 turned on whether Lincoln
        > would be elected again. I recently visited a Civil War battlefield
        > park at Franklin, Tennessee, commemorating the terrible Confederate
        > defeat there. I really wondered "what if" General Kirby Smith had
        > found a way to obey President Davis's order to send Lieutenant
        > General Richard Taylor's infantry corps across the Mississippi during
        > the summer of 1864. Could ten thousand more veteran infantry have
        > made a difference at the battle at Spring Hill, Tennessee, and
        > changed the outcome at Franklin, and perhaps the war? Or would
        > General Hood have just got them killed?
        > Best Regards,
        > Deryl P. Sellmeyer
        > Author, Jo Shelby's Iron Brigade
        >

        I don't think it was possible to find a way to ship 10,000 men across
        the Mississippi in 1864. Even if their was, I fail to see how the CSA
        would have moved them to TN in time for Hood's invasion. Lastly, I
        don't see more men helping Hood. The problem isn't men but supplies
        and transport. The AoT just lacks the ability to supply an army in the
        field. Richmond sent the majority of supplies to the AoNV and that
        included wagons and the teams to pull them.
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