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Re: the little breechloader

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  • Carl Williams
    interesting indeed that such a small weapon was so innovative that it drew such attention. And it originally was in the hands of the CSA? Probably British. I
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 7, 2007
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      interesting indeed that such a small weapon was so innovative that it
      drew such attention. And it originally was in the hands of the CSA?
      Probably British. I assume it didnt use metal cartridges; perhaps
      "prepared rounds" made for fast fire, however.
    • Tony Gunter
      ... worked ... cavalry ... aided ... from ... their ... the ... were ... Vicksburg ... Doh! Apparently, the website hasn t been updated in a while ... the
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 7, 2007
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        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Gunter" <tony_gunter@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > In the latest issue of North & South, a friend of mine, Jeff
        > Giambrone, has an article related to Vicksburg. Jeff formerly
        worked
        > at the Old Courthouse Museum and has mainly been involved in
        > regimental-history type writing, but this article is about a
        cavalry
        > battle west of the Big Black River just before the surrender of
        > Vicksburg. The 4th Iowa Cavalry was surprised and overwhelmed by 4
        > times their number, their avenue of retreat quickly interdicted,
        > while setting up a road block at Jones' Ford. The 4th Iowa was
        aided
        > by a little two-pounder breechloader that had been captured at
        > Jackson. The little gun was interesting enough to draw mention
        from
        > Sherman to Grant (and I paraphrase) "the enemy captured that little
        > two-pounder that we saw in Jackson." Fortunately, the 4th Iowa
        > managed to disable it by making off with the breech pin.
        >
        > Sherman, being typical Sherman, quipped "the men must not have
        their
        > pickets out." In reality, the pickets were quickly overrun, and
        the
        > men who filtered back to the union lines over the next few days
        were
        > lucky to have made it out with their lives.
        >
        > Should be an interesting little article, especially for any
        Vicksburg
        > fanatics.

        Doh! Apparently, the website hasn't been updated in a while ... the
        issue that has this article is a few issues old: Vol. 9, No. 7.
      • Tony Gunter
        ... I m not sure if it was the innovation or the size of the weapon that drew notice. Like what would you use something this small for ... hey, I know, let s
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 7, 2007
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          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > interesting indeed that such a small weapon was so innovative that it
          > drew such attention. And it originally was in the hands of the CSA?
          > Probably British. I assume it didnt use metal cartridges; perhaps
          > "prepared rounds" made for fast fire, however.
          >

          I'm not sure if it was the innovation or the size of the weapon that
          drew notice. Like "what would you use something this small for ...
          hey, I know, let's give it to the cavalry."

          :)
        • Tony Gunter
          ... that it ... CSA? ... that ... I believe Jeff s theory is that it was a two-pounder Hughes gun, some of which were actually forged right there in Jackson,
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 8, 2007
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            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Gunter" <tony_gunter@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > interesting indeed that such a small weapon was so innovative
            that it
            > > drew such attention. And it originally was in the hands of the
            CSA?
            > > Probably British. I assume it didnt use metal cartridges; perhaps
            > > "prepared rounds" made for fast fire, however.
            > >
            >
            > I'm not sure if it was the innovation or the size of the weapon
            that
            > drew notice. Like "what would you use something this small for ...
            > hey, I know, let's give it to the cavalry."
            >
            > :)
            >

            I believe Jeff's theory is that it was a two-pounder Hughes gun, some
            of which were actually forged right there in Jackson, Mississippi.
            The weight of the gun was something like 80 pounds, if I remember
            correctly, which made it easy for cavalry to haul around.
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