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Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck

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  • Dave Smith
    Do you have a date of his death? ... maybe some of you can help with some research I am working on. My Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 11, 2007
      Do you have a date of his death?

      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Friends,
      > With all of this discussion of the fighting around Vicksburg,
      maybe some of you can help with some research I am working on. My
      Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his ancestor, Robert
      H. Jackson, a private in the 52nd Georgia, who died in a train wreck
      near Meridian Mississippi. We believe the train wreck was near Chunky
      Creek and are trying to locate the final resting place of Pvt.
      Jackson. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
      >
      > Steve Hall - Commander
      > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
      > Sons of Confederate Veterans
      > Chatsworth, Georgia
      >
    • Tony Gunter
      ... I remember reading about the wreck in question, but I cannot remember for the life of me the source. I think the river was flooded above the level of the
      Message 2 of 19 , Jul 11, 2007
        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Smith" <dmsmith001@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Do you have a date of his death?

        I remember reading about the wreck in question, but I cannot remember
        for the life of me the source. I think the river was flooded above the
        level of the tracks, and the train attempted to cross anyway, losing
        several cars filled with men in the process.
      • Steve Hall
        The information supplied by his descendant is that he was mustered in the 52nd Georgia Co. I Sept. 1, 1863 and he was killed in a train accident at Meridian
        Message 3 of 19 , Jul 11, 2007
          The information supplied by his descendant is that he was mustered in the 52nd Georgia Co. I Sept. 1, 1863 and he was killed in a train accident at Meridian Miss. in 1863.  The wreck at Chunky Creek was at 3:00 a.m. on the morning of Feb. 19, 1863.  I have not been able to find a list of the soldiers killed and there were also civilians killed in the wreck. 
           
          Steve Hall - Commander
          Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
          Sons of Confederate Veterans
          Chatsworth, Georgia
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Wednesday, July 11, 2007 11:00 AM
          Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck

          Do you have a date of his death?

          --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@ ...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Friends,
          > With all of this discussion of the fighting around Vicksburg,
          maybe some of you can help with some research I am working on. My
          Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his ancestor, Robert
          H. Jackson, a private in the 52nd Georgia, who died in a train wreck
          near Meridian Mississippi. We believe the train wreck was near Chunky
          Creek and are trying to locate the final resting place of Pvt.
          Jackson. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
          >
          > Steve Hall - Commander
          > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
          > Sons of Confederate Veterans
          > Chatsworth, Georgia
          >

        • Steve Hall
          Tony, There is a web site about the wreck and, according to it, the water was not quite that high, but had dislodged the bridge, knocking is slightly off line
          Message 4 of 19 , Jul 11, 2007
            Tony,
                There is a web site about the wreck and, according to it, the water was not quite that high, but had dislodged the bridge, knocking is slightly off line to the rest of the track and the engineer did not see the signal in time to stop.  The site is http://nchgs.org/history/trainwreck/ and I have tried to contact the site owner, but to no avail.
             
            Steve Hall - Commander
            Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
            Sons of Confederate Veterans
            Chatsworth, Georgia
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Wednesday, July 11, 2007 12:10 PM
            Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck

            --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, "Dave Smith" <dmsmith001@ ...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Do you have a date of his death?

            I remember reading about the wreck in question, but I cannot remember
            for the life of me the source. I think the river was flooded above the
            level of the tracks, and the train attempted to cross anyway, losing
            several cars filled with men in the process.

          • Dave Smith
            ... the ... That makes sense; I wondered at first if it was tied to Grierson s Raid or the later Meridian campaign. There wasn t much going on that far in the
            Message 5 of 19 , Jul 12, 2007
              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Gunter" <tony_gunter@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Smith" <dmsmith001@>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > Do you have a date of his death?
              >
              > I remember reading about the wreck in question, but I cannot remember
              > for the life of me the source. I think the river was flooded above
              the
              > level of the tracks, and the train attempted to cross anyway, losing
              > several cars filled with men in the process.
              >
              That makes sense; I wondered at first if it was tied to Grierson's Raid
              or the later Meridian campaign. There wasn't much going on that far in
              the interior in February of 1863.

              Dave
            • franbolton
              Steve, from the Historical Research Project, Newton Co (MS) History Assignment #18: In June 1863 a train carrying wounded soldiers from Chunky River about 2
              Message 6 of 19 , Jul 12, 2007
                Steve, from the Historical Research Project, Newton Co (MS) History
                Assignment #18:
                "In June 1863 a train carrying wounded soldiers from Chunky River
                about 2 miles West of Chunky wrecked on Little Chunky River. The
                soldiers were thrown into the swollen stream and nearly all were
                drowned. Many were rescued but 63 bodies were rescued and buried on
                the west bank of the stream, in 3 trenches. One of the trenches was
                on the railroad right-of-way and the other 2 in a field. No record of
                their command or identity was kept and these brave soldiers sleep in
                their nameless graves."
                Sources of information include "History of Newton County MS by AJ
                Brown. I'm not sure of the date this paper was written, but it
                mentions names of 84, 85, 94, and 95 yr old residents of Decatur Ms
                as sources of other information.
                I have the History of Newton County MS book, and a copy of the Newton
                Record Sesquicentennial newspaper that I will check for more possible
                info.
                Sincerely,
                Fran Bolton





                --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Friends,
                > With all of this discussion of the fighting around Vicksburg,
                maybe some of you can help with some research I am working on. My
                Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his ancestor,
                Robert H. Jackson, a private in the 52nd Georgia, who died in a train
                wreck near Meridian Mississippi. We believe the train wreck was near
                Chunky Creek and are trying to locate the final resting place of Pvt.
                Jackson. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
                >
                > Steve Hall - Commander
                > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                > Chatsworth, Georgia
                >
              • hank9174
                This is way cool... It is great to have requests and real information converge... ... of ... in ... Newton ... possible ... train ... near ... Pvt.
                Message 7 of 19 , Jul 12, 2007
                  This is way cool... It is great to have requests and real information
                  converge...

                  --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "franbolton" <franbolton@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Steve, from the Historical Research Project, Newton Co (MS) History
                  > Assignment #18:
                  > "In June 1863 a train carrying wounded soldiers from Chunky River
                  > about 2 miles West of Chunky wrecked on Little Chunky River. The
                  > soldiers were thrown into the swollen stream and nearly all were
                  > drowned. Many were rescued but 63 bodies were rescued and buried on
                  > the west bank of the stream, in 3 trenches. One of the trenches was
                  > on the railroad right-of-way and the other 2 in a field. No record
                  of
                  > their command or identity was kept and these brave soldiers sleep
                  in
                  > their nameless graves."
                  > Sources of information include "History of Newton County MS by AJ
                  > Brown. I'm not sure of the date this paper was written, but it
                  > mentions names of 84, 85, 94, and 95 yr old residents of Decatur Ms
                  > as sources of other information.
                  > I have the History of Newton County MS book, and a copy of the
                  Newton
                  > Record Sesquicentennial newspaper that I will check for more
                  possible
                  > info.
                  > Sincerely,
                  > Fran Bolton
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Friends,
                  > > With all of this discussion of the fighting around Vicksburg,
                  > maybe some of you can help with some research I am working on. My
                  > Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his ancestor,
                  > Robert H. Jackson, a private in the 52nd Georgia, who died in a
                  train
                  > wreck near Meridian Mississippi. We believe the train wreck was
                  near
                  > Chunky Creek and are trying to locate the final resting place of
                  Pvt.
                  > Jackson. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
                  > >
                  > > Steve Hall - Commander
                  > > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                  > > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                  > > Chatsworth, Georgia
                  > >
                  >
                • Steve Hall
                  Hmm, This is interesting. You state, from your source, that the wreck was in June, 1863, while the website http://nchgs.org/history/trainwreck/ says that the
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jul 12, 2007
                    Hmm,
                        This is interesting.  You state, from your source, that the wreck was in June, 1863, while the website http://nchgs.org/history/trainwreck/ says that the wreck happened on Feb. 19, 1863.  This makes me wonder if there were not more than one train wreck in the area in 1863, although the website mentions nothing about any other wreck.  The site does have a listing of 26 people who died and says that "Most of the passengers who had been killed were buried in trenches on a farm belonging to A. F. Temple, two miles east of Hickory Station." 
                        One very interesting point made by the article is: "Many of the passengers were killed on impact. Others were swept up in the icy waters of the flooded creek. A cry went out for help.

                    Help came quicker than expected. The First Battalion of Choctaw Indians, under the command of Major S. G. Spann, was based at a Confederate military training camp near the crash scene. Led by Jack Amos and Elder Williams, the Indians rushed to the scene, stripped, and plunged into the flooded creek. Many of the passengers were rescued due to their heroic acts."
                     
                    I had not realized that there were Choctaw Indians on this side of the Mississippi at that time.
                     
                    Steve Hall - Commander
                    Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                    Sons of Confederate Veterans
                    Chatsworth, Georgia
                     


                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2007 12:19 PM
                    Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck



                    Steve, from the Historical Research Project, Newton Co (MS) History
                    Assignment #18:
                    "In June 1863 a train carrying wounded soldiers from Chunky River
                    about 2 miles West of Chunky wrecked on Little Chunky River. The
                    soldiers were thrown into the swollen stream and nearly all were
                    drowned. Many were rescued but 63 bodies were rescued and buried on
                    the west bank of the stream, in 3 trenches. One of the trenches was
                    on the railroad right-of-way and the other 2 in a field. No record of
                    their command or identity was kept and these brave soldiers sleep in
                    their nameless graves."
                    Sources of information include "History of Newton County MS by AJ
                    Brown. I'm not sure of the date this paper was written, but it
                    mentions names of 84, 85, 94, and 95 yr old residents of Decatur Ms
                    as sources of other information.
                    I have the History of Newton County MS book, and a copy of the Newton
                    Record Sesquicentennial newspaper that I will check for more possible
                    info.
                    Sincerely,
                    Fran Bolton

                    --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@ ...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Friends,
                    > With all of this discussion of the fighting around Vicksburg,
                    maybe some of you can help with some research I am working on. My
                    Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his ancestor,
                    Robert H. Jackson, a private in the 52nd Georgia, who died in a train
                    wreck near Meridian Mississippi. We believe the train wreck was near
                    Chunky Creek and are trying to locate the final resting place of Pvt.
                    Jackson. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
                    >
                    > Steve Hall - Commander
                    > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                    > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                    > Chatsworth, Georgia
                    >

                  • Steve Hall
                    Hank, Do you mean that this is not the norm in this group? I was under the impression that this was how the group was supposed to operate. Steve Hall -
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jul 12, 2007
                      Hank,
                          Do you mean that this is not the norm in this group?  I was under the impression that this was how the group was supposed to operate.
                       
                      Steve Hall - Commander
                      Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                      Sons of Confederate Veterans
                      Chatsworth, Georgia
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: hank9174
                      Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2007 3:14 PM
                      Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck


                      This is way cool... It is great to have requests and real information
                      converge...

                      --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, "franbolton" <franbolton@ ...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Steve, from the Historical Research Project, Newton Co (MS) History
                      > Assignment #18:
                      > "In June 1863 a train carrying wounded soldiers from Chunky River
                      > about 2 miles West of Chunky wrecked on Little Chunky River. The
                      > soldiers were thrown into the swollen stream and nearly all were
                      > drowned. Many were rescued but 63 bodies were rescued and buried on
                      > the west bank of the stream, in 3 trenches. One of the trenches was
                      > on the railroad right-of-way and the other 2 in a field. No record
                      of
                      > their command or identity was kept and these brave soldiers sleep
                      in
                      > their nameless graves."
                      > Sources of information include "History of Newton County MS by AJ
                      > Brown. I'm not sure of the date this paper was written, but it
                      > mentions names of 84, 85, 94, and 95 yr old residents of Decatur Ms
                      > as sources of other information.
                      > I have the History of Newton County MS book, and a copy of the
                      Newton
                      > Record Sesquicentennial newspaper that I will check for more
                      possible
                      > info.
                      > Sincerely,
                      > Fran Bolton
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@ >
                      > wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Friends,
                      > > With all of this discussion of the fighting around Vicksburg,
                      > maybe some of you can help with some research I am working on. My
                      > Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his ancestor,
                      > Robert H. Jackson, a private in the 52nd Georgia, who died in a
                      train
                      > wreck near Meridian Mississippi. We believe the train wreck was
                      near
                      > Chunky Creek and are trying to locate the final resting place of
                      Pvt.
                      > Jackson. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
                      > >
                      > > Steve Hall - Commander
                      > > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                      > > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                      > > Chatsworth, Georgia
                      > >
                      >

                    • franbolton
                      Steve, I knew there was a difference in the reported dates, but I copied as it was. There was a band of Choctaw Indians north of Decatur MS, near Philadelphia,
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jul 12, 2007
                        Steve, I knew there was a difference in the reported dates, but I
                        copied as it was.
                        There was a band of Choctaw Indians north of Decatur MS, near
                        Philadelphia, that took land in MS and agreed to become US citizens
                        in lieu of land in IT. That band has grown today, they have their own
                        town, Choctaw MS, own the American Greeting Card Co (the one with the
                        red heart on the back) among other companies, and are totally self-
                        sufficient, with their own hospital, fire department, etc. An amazing
                        story. Their future chief was in Germany rebuilding the devastation
                        after WW11, came home with the thought that if a town could be
                        rebuilt from ruins, he could build a town from nothing.....which he
                        did. The tribe, The Mississippi Band of Choctaw was federally
                        recognized by the US Gov in 1945.
                        Another interesting story I read about the train wreck rescue was
                        that Indians don't swim, but they plunged into the waters to help
                        rescue the victims. Sincerely,Fran Bolton--

                        In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hmm,
                        > This is interesting. You state, from your source, that the
                        wreck was in June, 1863, while the website
                        http://nchgs.org/history/trainwreck/ says that the wreck happened on
                        Feb. 19, 1863. This makes me wonder if there were not more than one
                        train wreck in the area in 1863, although the website mentions
                        nothing about any other wreck. The site does have a listing of 26
                        people who died and says that "Most of the passengers who had been
                        killed were buried in trenches on a farm belonging to A. F. Temple,
                        two miles east of Hickory Station."
                        > One very interesting point made by the article is: "Many of the
                        passengers were killed on impact. Others were swept up in the icy
                        waters of the flooded creek. A cry went out for help.
                        >
                        > Help came quicker than expected. The First Battalion of Choctaw
                        Indians, under the command of Major S. G. Spann, was based at a
                        Confederate military training camp near the crash scene. Led by Jack
                        Amos and Elder Williams, the Indians rushed to the scene, stripped,
                        and plunged into the flooded creek. Many of the passengers were
                        rescued due to their heroic acts."
                        >
                        > I had not realized that there were Choctaw Indians on this side of
                        the Mississippi at that time.
                        >
                        > Steve Hall - Commander
                        > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                        > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                        > Chatsworth, Georgia
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: franbolton
                        > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2007 12:19 PM
                        > Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Steve, from the Historical Research Project, Newton Co (MS)
                        History
                        > Assignment #18:
                        > "In June 1863 a train carrying wounded soldiers from Chunky River
                        > about 2 miles West of Chunky wrecked on Little Chunky River. The
                        > soldiers were thrown into the swollen stream and nearly all were
                        > drowned. Many were rescued but 63 bodies were rescued and buried
                        on
                        > the west bank of the stream, in 3 trenches. One of the trenches
                        was
                        > on the railroad right-of-way and the other 2 in a field. No
                        record of
                        > their command or identity was kept and these brave soldiers sleep
                        in
                        > their nameless graves."
                        > Sources of information include "History of Newton County MS by AJ
                        > Brown. I'm not sure of the date this paper was written, but it
                        > mentions names of 84, 85, 94, and 95 yr old residents of Decatur
                        Ms
                        > as sources of other information.
                        > I have the History of Newton County MS book, and a copy of the
                        Newton
                        > Record Sesquicentennial newspaper that I will check for more
                        possible
                        > info.
                        > Sincerely,
                        > Fran Bolton
                        >
                        > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@>
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Friends,
                        > > With all of this discussion of the fighting around Vicksburg,
                        > maybe some of you can help with some research I am working on. My
                        > Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his ancestor,
                        > Robert H. Jackson, a private in the 52nd Georgia, who died in a
                        train
                        > wreck near Meridian Mississippi. We believe the train wreck was
                        near
                        > Chunky Creek and are trying to locate the final resting place of
                        Pvt.
                        > Jackson. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
                        > >
                        > > Steve Hall - Commander
                        > > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                        > > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                        > > Chatsworth, Georgia
                        > >
                        >
                      • Sweetsstar@aol.com
                        In a message dated 7/12/2007 9:53:38 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, franbolton@yahoo.com writes: Another interesting story I read about the train wreck rescue was
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jul 12, 2007
                          In a message dated 7/12/2007 9:53:38 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, franbolton@... writes:
                          Another interesting story I read about the train wreck rescue was
                          that Indians don't swim, but they plunged into the waters to help
                          rescue the victims. Sincerely,Fran Bolton--

                           Wow Fran I was wondering when I read the first posting if they could swim.  That is amazing.  The whole story you posted on the Choctaw is interesting . Thanks for the information .  Amazing what we learn here .
                          Susan




                          Get a sneak peak of the all-new AOL.com.
                        • franbolton
                          Steve, these are the sources given for the Chunky Creek train wreck of Feb 19, 1863 on the http://nchgs.org/history/trainwreck/ site. I would tend to think
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jul 12, 2007
                            Steve, these are the sources given for the Chunky Creek train wreck
                            of Feb 19, 1863 on the http://nchgs.org/history/trainwreck/ site. I
                            would tend to think this is correct, as the #1 source appears to be a
                            newspaper dated just a few days later.

                            1.The Daily Southern Crisis, Jackson, Mississippi, February 26, 1863
                            and February 28, 1863
                            2. McClung Collection, Knox County (Tennessee) Public Library
                            3.Confederate Veterans Magazine, Vol. XIII, December 1905, pp. 560-561
                            Official Records of the Confederate Army, Department of Archives &
                            History, Jackson, Mississippi.

                            Sincerely,
                            Fran Bolton





                            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "franbolton" <franbolton@...>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > Steve, I knew there was a difference in the reported dates, but I
                            > copied as it was.
                            > There was a band of Choctaw Indians north of Decatur MS, near
                            > Philadelphia, that took land in MS and agreed to become US citizens
                            > in lieu of land in IT. That band has grown today, they have their
                            own
                            > town, Choctaw MS, own the American Greeting Card Co (the one with
                            the
                            > red heart on the back) among other companies, and are totally self-
                            > sufficient, with their own hospital, fire department, etc. An
                            amazing
                            > story. Their future chief was in Germany rebuilding the devastation
                            > after WW11, came home with the thought that if a town could be
                            > rebuilt from ruins, he could build a town from nothing.....which he
                            > did. The tribe, The Mississippi Band of Choctaw was federally
                            > recognized by the US Gov in 1945.
                            > Another interesting story I read about the train wreck rescue was
                            > that Indians don't swim, but they plunged into the waters to help
                            > rescue the victims. Sincerely,Fran Bolton--
                            >
                            > In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Hmm,
                            > > This is interesting. You state, from your source, that the
                            > wreck was in June, 1863, while the website
                            > http://nchgs.org/history/trainwreck/ says that the wreck happened
                            on
                            > Feb. 19, 1863. This makes me wonder if there were not more than
                            one
                            > train wreck in the area in 1863, although the website mentions
                            > nothing about any other wreck. The site does have a listing of 26
                            > people who died and says that "Most of the passengers who had been
                            > killed were buried in trenches on a farm belonging to A. F. Temple,
                            > two miles east of Hickory Station."
                            > > One very interesting point made by the article is: "Many of
                            the
                            > passengers were killed on impact. Others were swept up in the icy
                            > waters of the flooded creek. A cry went out for help.
                            > >
                            > > Help came quicker than expected. The First Battalion of Choctaw
                            > Indians, under the command of Major S. G. Spann, was based at a
                            > Confederate military training camp near the crash scene. Led by
                            Jack
                            > Amos and Elder Williams, the Indians rushed to the scene, stripped,
                            > and plunged into the flooded creek. Many of the passengers were
                            > rescued due to their heroic acts."
                            > >
                            > > I had not realized that there were Choctaw Indians on this side
                            of
                            > the Mississippi at that time.
                            > >
                            > > Steve Hall - Commander
                            > > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                            > > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                            > > Chatsworth, Georgia
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > ----- Original Message -----
                            > > From: franbolton
                            > > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                            > > Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2007 12:19 PM
                            > > Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Steve, from the Historical Research Project, Newton Co (MS)
                            > History
                            > > Assignment #18:
                            > > "In June 1863 a train carrying wounded soldiers from Chunky
                            River
                            > > about 2 miles West of Chunky wrecked on Little Chunky River.
                            The
                            > > soldiers were thrown into the swollen stream and nearly all
                            were
                            > > drowned. Many were rescued but 63 bodies were rescued and
                            buried
                            > on
                            > > the west bank of the stream, in 3 trenches. One of the trenches
                            > was
                            > > on the railroad right-of-way and the other 2 in a field. No
                            > record of
                            > > their command or identity was kept and these brave soldiers
                            sleep
                            > in
                            > > their nameless graves."
                            > > Sources of information include "History of Newton County MS by
                            AJ
                            > > Brown. I'm not sure of the date this paper was written, but it
                            > > mentions names of 84, 85, 94, and 95 yr old residents of
                            Decatur
                            > Ms
                            > > as sources of other information.
                            > > I have the History of Newton County MS book, and a copy of the
                            > Newton
                            > > Record Sesquicentennial newspaper that I will check for more
                            > possible
                            > > info.
                            > > Sincerely,
                            > > Fran Bolton
                            > >
                            > > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@>
                            > > wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Friends,
                            > > > With all of this discussion of the fighting around Vicksburg,
                            > > maybe some of you can help with some research I am working on.
                            My
                            > > Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his ancestor,
                            > > Robert H. Jackson, a private in the 52nd Georgia, who died in a
                            > train
                            > > wreck near Meridian Mississippi. We believe the train wreck was
                            > near
                            > > Chunky Creek and are trying to locate the final resting place
                            of
                            > Pvt.
                            > > Jackson. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
                            > > >
                            > > > Steve Hall - Commander
                            > > > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                            > > > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                            > > > Chatsworth, Georgia
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • franbolton
                            Susan, have you also heard that Indians don t swim? I m still looking for where I read that in connection with the Chunky River train wreck, I have spent some
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jul 12, 2007
                              Susan, have you also heard that Indians don't swim? I'm still looking
                              for where I read that in connection with the Chunky River train
                              wreck, I have spent some time tonight re-reading "The History of
                              Newton Co MS 1834-1894, written in 1894, but without an index it is
                              time consuming. One other place I will try tomorrow is the
                              Sesquicentennial issue of the Newton County (MS)Record newspaper.
                              Sincerely, Fran Bolton

                              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, Sweetsstar@... wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > In a message dated 7/12/2007 9:53:38 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
                              > franbolton@... writes:
                              >
                              > Another interesting story I read about the train wreck rescue was
                              > that Indians don't swim, but they plunged into the waters to help
                              > rescue the victims. Sincerely,Fran Bolton--
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Wow Fran I was wondering when I read the first posting if they
                              could swim.
                              > That is amazing. The whole story you posted on the Choctaw is
                              interesting .
                              > Thanks for the information . Amazing what we learn here .
                              > Susan
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ************************************** Get a sneak peak of the all-
                              new AOL at
                              > http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour
                              >
                            • Sweetsstar@aol.com
                              In a message dated 7/12/2007 10:40:11 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, franbolton@yahoo.com writes: Susan, have you also heard that Indians don t swim? I m still
                              Message 14 of 19 , Jul 12, 2007
                                In a message dated 7/12/2007 10:40:11 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, franbolton@... writes:
                                Susan, have you also heard that Indians don't swim? I'm still looking
                                for where I read that in connection with the Chunky River train
                                wreck, I have spent some time tonight re-reading "The History of
                                Newton Co MS 1834-1894, written in 1894, but without an index it is
                                time consuming. One other place I will try tomorrow is the
                                Sesquicentennial issue of the Newton County (MS)Record newspaper.
                                Sincerely, Fran Bolton

                                Fran I have not heard that Indians don't swim but was thinking maybe these never learned to swim but just dived in to save the people which was an amazing feat if they didn't swim and how cold the water would have been if the one date is the right date.  I never realized the Choctaw owned the greeting card company .  Amazing . 
                                Susan




                                Get a sneak peak of the all-new AOL.com.
                              • franbolton
                                Steve, here is another site that gives the date of the Chunky Creek Train wreck as June 1863, Choctaw Indians As Confederate Soldiers By Maj. S. G. Spann,
                                Message 15 of 19 , Jul 12, 2007
                                  Steve, here is another site that gives the date of the Chunky Creek
                                  Train wreck as June 1863,
                                  Choctaw Indians As Confederate Soldiers
                                  By
                                  Maj. S. G. Spann, Commander
                                  Dabney H. Maury Camp, No. 1312, U.C.V., Meridian Miss.

                                  http://www.choctaw.org/history/confederate.htm
                                  Exerpt:
                                  "At this juncture, with my interpreter, Jack Amos, I went up to the
                                  Newton County camp. While there in the early part of June, 1863, rain
                                  fell in torrents, flooding the streams, the roads became impassable,
                                  and country bridges were washed away. Vicksburg was being besieged by
                                  Grant, and reenforcements were ordered to the assistance of
                                  Pemberton. Chunkey River intervened, and the bridge across the river
                                  was submerged and the water far out of the river banks. The engineer
                                  was under military orders, and his long train of cars was filled with
                                  Confederate soldiers, who, like the engineer, were animated with but
                                  one impulse-to Vicksburg! to victory or death!
                                  Onward rushed the engineer. All passed over except the hindmost car.
                                  The bridge had swerved out of plumb, and into the raging waters with
                                  nearly one hundred soldiers the rear car was precipitated."

                                  I also checked the 150 yr anniversary issue of the Newton Record
                                  newspaper of 1986, (dusty!)and it too gives the June 1863 date.
                                  It told of another train wreck on at the "trestle" in Chunky in
                                  1912, killing one man. There were photos of another wreck, a fast
                                  passenger train passing through Chunky that jumped the track, no date
                                  given, but said no one was killed in that one.
                                  Susan said we learn a lot here... I agree.... we have learned NOT to
                                  ride a train in, around or through Chunky MS!
                                  Fran Bolton





                                  --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "franbolton" <franbolton@...>
                                  wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Steve, these are the sources given for the Chunky Creek train wreck
                                  > of Feb 19, 1863 on the http://nchgs.org/history/trainwreck/ site.
                                  I
                                  > would tend to think this is correct, as the #1 source appears to be
                                  a
                                  > newspaper dated just a few days later.
                                  >
                                  > 1.The Daily Southern Crisis, Jackson, Mississippi, February 26,
                                  1863
                                  > and February 28, 1863
                                  > 2. McClung Collection, Knox County (Tennessee) Public Library
                                  > 3.Confederate Veterans Magazine, Vol. XIII, December 1905, pp. 560-
                                  561
                                  > Official Records of the Confederate Army, Department of Archives &
                                  > History, Jackson, Mississippi.
                                  >
                                  > Sincerely,
                                  > Fran Bolton
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "franbolton" <franbolton@>
                                  > wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > Steve, I knew there was a difference in the reported dates, but I
                                  > > copied as it was.
                                  > > There was a band of Choctaw Indians north of Decatur MS, near
                                  > > Philadelphia, that took land in MS and agreed to become US
                                  citizens
                                  > > in lieu of land in IT. That band has grown today, they have their
                                  > own
                                  > > town, Choctaw MS, own the American Greeting Card Co (the one with
                                  > the
                                  > > red heart on the back) among other companies, and are totally
                                  self-
                                  > > sufficient, with their own hospital, fire department, etc. An
                                  > amazing
                                  > > story. Their future chief was in Germany rebuilding the
                                  devastation
                                  > > after WW11, came home with the thought that if a town could be
                                  > > rebuilt from ruins, he could build a town from nothing.....which
                                  he
                                  > > did. The tribe, The Mississippi Band of Choctaw was federally
                                  > > recognized by the US Gov in 1945.
                                  > > Another interesting story I read about the train wreck rescue was
                                  > > that Indians don't swim, but they plunged into the waters to help
                                  > > rescue the victims. Sincerely,Fran Bolton--
                                  > >
                                  > > In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@> wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Hmm,
                                  > > > This is interesting. You state, from your source, that the
                                  > > wreck was in June, 1863, while the website
                                  > > http://nchgs.org/history/trainwreck/ says that the wreck happened
                                  > on
                                  > > Feb. 19, 1863. This makes me wonder if there were not more than
                                  > one
                                  > > train wreck in the area in 1863, although the website mentions
                                  > > nothing about any other wreck. The site does have a listing of
                                  26
                                  > > people who died and says that "Most of the passengers who had
                                  been
                                  > > killed were buried in trenches on a farm belonging to A. F.
                                  Temple,
                                  > > two miles east of Hickory Station."
                                  > > > One very interesting point made by the article is: "Many of
                                  > the
                                  > > passengers were killed on impact. Others were swept up in the icy
                                  > > waters of the flooded creek. A cry went out for help.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Help came quicker than expected. The First Battalion of Choctaw
                                  > > Indians, under the command of Major S. G. Spann, was based at a
                                  > > Confederate military training camp near the crash scene. Led by
                                  > Jack
                                  > > Amos and Elder Williams, the Indians rushed to the scene,
                                  stripped,
                                  > > and plunged into the flooded creek. Many of the passengers were
                                  > > rescued due to their heroic acts."
                                  > > >
                                  > > > I had not realized that there were Choctaw Indians on this side
                                  > of
                                  > > the Mississippi at that time.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Steve Hall - Commander
                                  > > > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                                  > > > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                                  > > > Chatsworth, Georgia
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > > ----- Original Message -----
                                  > > > From: franbolton
                                  > > > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                  > > > Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2007 12:19 PM
                                  > > > Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Steve, from the Historical Research Project, Newton Co (MS)
                                  > > History
                                  > > > Assignment #18:
                                  > > > "In June 1863 a train carrying wounded soldiers from Chunky
                                  > River
                                  > > > about 2 miles West of Chunky wrecked on Little Chunky River.
                                  > The
                                  > > > soldiers were thrown into the swollen stream and nearly all
                                  > were
                                  > > > drowned. Many were rescued but 63 bodies were rescued and
                                  > buried
                                  > > on
                                  > > > the west bank of the stream, in 3 trenches. One of the
                                  trenches
                                  > > was
                                  > > > on the railroad right-of-way and the other 2 in a field. No
                                  > > record of
                                  > > > their command or identity was kept and these brave soldiers
                                  > sleep
                                  > > in
                                  > > > their nameless graves."
                                  > > > Sources of information include "History of Newton County MS
                                  by
                                  > AJ
                                  > > > Brown. I'm not sure of the date this paper was written, but
                                  it
                                  > > > mentions names of 84, 85, 94, and 95 yr old residents of
                                  > Decatur
                                  > > Ms
                                  > > > as sources of other information.
                                  > > > I have the History of Newton County MS book, and a copy of
                                  the
                                  > > Newton
                                  > > > Record Sesquicentennial newspaper that I will check for more
                                  > > possible
                                  > > > info.
                                  > > > Sincerely,
                                  > > > Fran Bolton
                                  > > >
                                  > > > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall"
                                  <Tunnelhill@>
                                  > > > wrote:
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Friends,
                                  > > > > With all of this discussion of the fighting around
                                  Vicksburg,
                                  > > > maybe some of you can help with some research I am working
                                  on.
                                  > My
                                  > > > Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his
                                  ancestor,
                                  > > > Robert H. Jackson, a private in the 52nd Georgia, who died in
                                  a
                                  > > train
                                  > > > wreck near Meridian Mississippi. We believe the train wreck
                                  was
                                  > > near
                                  > > > Chunky Creek and are trying to locate the final resting place
                                  > of
                                  > > Pvt.
                                  > > > Jackson. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Steve Hall - Commander
                                  > > > > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                                  > > > > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                                  > > > > Chatsworth, Georgia
                                  > > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                • Steve Hall
                                  Thanks for the information. I hope you don t think I was doubting your word on the dates, but you know as well as I that different sources sometimes give
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Jul 13, 2007
                                    Thanks for the information.  I hope you don't think I was doubting your word on the dates, but you know as well as I that different sources sometimes give different information.  Since I am researching this to help my department supervisor find the location of his ancestor's grave, I didn't want to send him in the wrong direction if there were two different train wrecks in the area.  Thanks again for all of the help.
                                     
                                    Steve Hall - Commander
                                    Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                                    Sons of Confederate Veterans
                                    Chatsworth, Georgia
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    Sent: Friday, July 13, 2007 12:53 AM
                                    Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck

                                    Steve, I knew there was a difference in the reported dates, but I
                                    copied as it was.
                                    There was a band of Choctaw Indians north of Decatur MS, near
                                    Philadelphia, that took land in MS and agreed to become US citizens
                                    in lieu of land in IT. That band has grown today, they have their own
                                    town, Choctaw MS, own the American Greeting Card Co (the one with the
                                    red heart on the back) among other companies, and are totally self-
                                    sufficient, with their own hospital, fire department, etc. An amazing
                                    story. Their future chief was in Germany rebuilding the devastation
                                    after WW11, came home with the thought that if a town could be
                                    rebuilt from ruins, he could build a town from nothing..... which he
                                    did. The tribe, The Mississippi Band of Choctaw was federally
                                    recognized by the US Gov in 1945.
                                    Another interesting story I read about the train wreck rescue was
                                    that Indians don't swim, but they plunged into the waters to help
                                    rescue the victims. Sincerely,Fran Bolton--

                                    In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@ ...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Hmm,
                                    > This is interesting. You state, from your source, that the
                                    wreck was in June, 1863, while the website
                                    http://nchgs. org/history/ trainwreck/ says that the wreck happened on
                                    Feb. 19, 1863. This makes me wonder if there were not more than one
                                    train wreck in the area in 1863, although the website mentions
                                    nothing about any other wreck. The site does have a listing of 26
                                    people who died and says that "Most of the passengers who had been
                                    killed were buried in trenches on a farm belonging to A. F. Temple,
                                    two miles east of Hickory Station."
                                    > One very interesting point made by the article is: "Many of the
                                    passengers were killed on impact. Others were swept up in the icy
                                    waters of the flooded creek. A cry went out for help.
                                    >
                                    > Help came quicker than expected. The First Battalion of Choctaw
                                    Indians, under the command of Major S. G. Spann, was based at a
                                    Confederate military training camp near the crash scene. Led by Jack
                                    Amos and Elder Williams, the Indians rushed to the scene, stripped,
                                    and plunged into the flooded creek. Many of the passengers were
                                    rescued due to their heroic acts."
                                    >
                                    > I had not realized that there were Choctaw Indians on this side of
                                    the Mississippi at that time.
                                    >
                                    > Steve Hall - Commander
                                    > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                                    > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                                    > Chatsworth, Georgia
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ----- Original Message -----
                                    > From: franbolton
                                    > To: civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com
                                    > Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2007 12:19 PM
                                    > Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Steve, from the Historical Research Project, Newton Co (MS)
                                    History
                                    > Assignment #18:
                                    > "In June 1863 a train carrying wounded soldiers from Chunky River
                                    > about 2 miles West of Chunky wrecked on Little Chunky River. The
                                    > soldiers were thrown into the swollen stream and nearly all were
                                    > drowned. Many were rescued but 63 bodies were rescued and buried
                                    on
                                    > the west bank of the stream, in 3 trenches. One of the trenches
                                    was
                                    > on the railroad right-of-way and the other 2 in a field. No
                                    record of
                                    > their command or identity was kept and these brave soldiers sleep
                                    in
                                    > their nameless graves."
                                    > Sources of information include "History of Newton County MS by AJ
                                    > Brown. I'm not sure of the date this paper was written, but it
                                    > mentions names of 84, 85, 94, and 95 yr old residents of Decatur
                                    Ms
                                    > as sources of other information.
                                    > I have the History of Newton County MS book, and a copy of the
                                    Newton
                                    > Record Sesquicentennial newspaper that I will check for more
                                    possible
                                    > info.
                                    > Sincerely,
                                    > Fran Bolton
                                    >
                                    > --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@ >
                                    > wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Friends,
                                    > > With all of this discussion of the fighting around Vicksburg,
                                    > maybe some of you can help with some research I am working on. My
                                    > Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his ancestor,
                                    > Robert H. Jackson, a private in the 52nd Georgia, who died in a
                                    train
                                    > wreck near Meridian Mississippi. We believe the train wreck was
                                    near
                                    > Chunky Creek and are trying to locate the final resting place of
                                    Pvt.
                                    > Jackson. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
                                    > >
                                    > > Steve Hall - Commander
                                    > > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                                    > > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                                    > > Chatsworth, Georgia
                                    > >
                                    >

                                  • Steve Hall
                                    Susan, Keep in mind that the cause of the train wreck was due to damage of the bridge from the flooding! Not only was the water cold, but it would have been
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Jul 13, 2007
                                      Susan,
                                          Keep in mind that the cause of the train wreck was due to damage of the bridge from the flooding!  Not only was the water cold, but it would have been swift as well!
                                       
                                      Steve Hall - Commander
                                      Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                                      Sons of Confederate Veterans
                                      Chatsworth, Georgia
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      Sent: Friday, July 13, 2007 1:43 AM
                                      Subject: Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck

                                      In a message dated 7/12/2007 10:40:11 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, franbolton@yahoo. com writes:
                                      Susan, have you also heard that Indians don't swim? I'm still looking
                                      for where I read that in connection with the Chunky River train
                                      wreck, I have spent some time tonight re-reading "The History of
                                      Newton Co MS 1834-1894, written in 1894, but without an index it is
                                      time consuming. One other place I will try tomorrow is the
                                      Sesquicentennial issue of the Newton County (MS)Record newspaper.
                                      Sincerely, Fran Bolton

                                      Fran I have not heard that Indians don't swim but was thinking maybe these never learned to swim but just dived in to save the people which was an amazing feat if they didn't swim and how cold the water would have been if the one date is the right date.  I never realized the Choctaw owned the greeting card company .  Amazing . 
                                      Susan




                                      Get a sneak peak of the all-new AOL.com.

                                    • franbolton
                                      Steve, that is quite a difference in dates, freezing water in Feb, river swollen from torrential rains in June, but SURELY there were not two train derailment
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Jul 14, 2007
                                        Steve, that is quite a difference in dates, freezing water in Feb,
                                        river swollen from torrential rains in June, but SURELY there were
                                        not two train derailment accidents so similar?? And both confused
                                        into one, by so many accounts? Let's keep checking, Fran
                                        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@...>
                                        wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Thanks for the information. I hope you don't think I was doubting
                                        your word on the dates, but you know as well as I that different
                                        sources sometimes give different information. Since I am researching
                                        this to help my department supervisor find the location of his
                                        ancestor's grave, I didn't want to send him in the wrong direction if
                                        there were two different train wrecks in the area. Thanks again for
                                        all of the help.
                                        >
                                        > Steve Hall - Commander
                                        > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                                        > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                                        > Chatsworth, Georgia
                                        >
                                        > ----- Original Message -----
                                        > From: franbolton
                                        > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                        > Sent: Friday, July 13, 2007 12:53 AM
                                        > Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Steve, I knew there was a difference in the reported dates, but I
                                        > copied as it was.
                                        > There was a band of Choctaw Indians north of Decatur MS, near
                                        > Philadelphia, that took land in MS and agreed to become US
                                        citizens
                                        > in lieu of land in IT. That band has grown today, they have their
                                        own
                                        > town, Choctaw MS, own the American Greeting Card Co (the one with
                                        the
                                        > red heart on the back) among other companies, and are totally
                                        self-
                                        > sufficient, with their own hospital, fire department, etc. An
                                        amazing
                                        > story. Their future chief was in Germany rebuilding the
                                        devastation
                                        > after WW11, came home with the thought that if a town could be
                                        > rebuilt from ruins, he could build a town from nothing.....which
                                        he
                                        > did. The tribe, The Mississippi Band of Choctaw was federally
                                        > recognized by the US Gov in 1945.
                                        > Another interesting story I read about the train wreck rescue was
                                        > that Indians don't swim, but they plunged into the waters to help
                                        > rescue the victims. Sincerely,Fran Bolton--
                                        >
                                        > In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > Hmm,
                                        > > This is interesting. You state, from your source, that the
                                        > wreck was in June, 1863, while the website
                                        > http://nchgs.org/history/trainwreck/ says that the wreck happened
                                        on
                                        > Feb. 19, 1863. This makes me wonder if there were not more than
                                        one
                                        > train wreck in the area in 1863, although the website mentions
                                        > nothing about any other wreck. The site does have a listing of 26
                                        > people who died and says that "Most of the passengers who had
                                        been
                                        > killed were buried in trenches on a farm belonging to A. F.
                                        Temple,
                                        > two miles east of Hickory Station."
                                        > > One very interesting point made by the article is: "Many of the
                                        > passengers were killed on impact. Others were swept up in the icy
                                        > waters of the flooded creek. A cry went out for help.
                                        > >
                                        > > Help came quicker than expected. The First Battalion of Choctaw
                                        > Indians, under the command of Major S. G. Spann, was based at a
                                        > Confederate military training camp near the crash scene. Led by
                                        Jack
                                        > Amos and Elder Williams, the Indians rushed to the scene,
                                        stripped,
                                        > and plunged into the flooded creek. Many of the passengers were
                                        > rescued due to their heroic acts."
                                        > >
                                        > > I had not realized that there were Choctaw Indians on this side
                                        of
                                        > the Mississippi at that time.
                                        > >
                                        > > Steve Hall - Commander
                                        > > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                                        > > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                                        > > Chatsworth, Georgia
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > ----- Original Message -----
                                        > > From: franbolton
                                        > > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                        > > Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2007 12:19 PM
                                        > > Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Meridian Mississippi train wreck
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > Steve, from the Historical Research Project, Newton Co (MS)
                                        > History
                                        > > Assignment #18:
                                        > > "In June 1863 a train carrying wounded soldiers from Chunky
                                        River
                                        > > about 2 miles West of Chunky wrecked on Little Chunky River.
                                        The
                                        > > soldiers were thrown into the swollen stream and nearly all
                                        were
                                        > > drowned. Many were rescued but 63 bodies were rescued and
                                        buried
                                        > on
                                        > > the west bank of the stream, in 3 trenches. One of the trenches
                                        > was
                                        > > on the railroad right-of-way and the other 2 in a field. No
                                        > record of
                                        > > their command or identity was kept and these brave soldiers
                                        sleep
                                        > in
                                        > > their nameless graves."
                                        > > Sources of information include "History of Newton County MS by
                                        AJ
                                        > > Brown. I'm not sure of the date this paper was written, but it
                                        > > mentions names of 84, 85, 94, and 95 yr old residents of
                                        Decatur
                                        > Ms
                                        > > as sources of other information.
                                        > > I have the History of Newton County MS book, and a copy of the
                                        > Newton
                                        > > Record Sesquicentennial newspaper that I will check for more
                                        > possible
                                        > > info.
                                        > > Sincerely,
                                        > > Fran Bolton
                                        > >
                                        > > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Hall" <Tunnelhill@>
                                        > > wrote:
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Friends,
                                        > > > With all of this discussion of the fighting around Vicksburg,
                                        > > maybe some of you can help with some research I am working on.
                                        My
                                        > > Department Supervisor has contacted me concerning his ancestor,
                                        > > Robert H. Jackson, a private in the 52nd Georgia, who died in a
                                        > train
                                        > > wreck near Meridian Mississippi. We believe the train wreck was
                                        > near
                                        > > Chunky Creek and are trying to locate the final resting place
                                        of
                                        > Pvt.
                                        > > Jackson. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
                                        > > >
                                        > > > Steve Hall - Commander
                                        > > > Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp #938
                                        > > > Sons of Confederate Veterans
                                        > > > Chatsworth, Georgia
                                        > > >
                                        > >
                                        >
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