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For the conspiracy theorists ...

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  • Tony Gunter
    General Grant reports that General Johnston gave his infamous attack Sherman at Clinton order to three riders, one of which was a Unionist spy who had been
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 24, 2007
      General Grant reports that General Johnston gave his infamous "attack
      Sherman at Clinton" order to three riders, one of which was a
      Unionist spy who had been very publicly run out of town in Memphis in
      1862.

      However, General Johnston's memoirs specifically state that he gave
      the message only to Capt. Yerger, who said that he tried nearly all
      night to find Pemberton's HQ but, exhausted, decided to call it quits
      for the night and rent a room at a local inn. Yerger claimed that he
      handed the message off to a Pemberton staffer that was staying at the
      same inn ... and of course, the message ended up in McPherson's
      hands.

      Previously, the same Capt. Yerger had arrived in Raymond around 3
      a.m. and took command of the squadron of Wirt Adams' men who were
      supposed to be patrolling the roads towards Utica and Port Gibson.
      Yerger ends up conveniently unengaged on the Port Gibson road all
      day, and Wirt Adams, who had been ordered to move with his entire
      force to Raymond, does not show up with his force of 1300 men (Wirt
      Adams' cavalry plus nearly 500 men of the 20th Mississippi Mounted
      Infantry) until the Confederate force is in full retreat.

      The bottom line is that Capt. Yerger ends up connected to McPherson
      during two of the campaign's most critical turning points: Raymond
      and Champion Hill.
    • Carl Williams
      I m sorry to say I should get a little more background on the order to attack Sherman at Clinton and what that strategy even was. I ll try to look that up
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007
        I'm sorry to say I should get a little more background on the "order
        to attack Sherman at Clinton" and what that strategy even was.

        I'll try to look that up but perhaps someone can also explain?
      • Tony Gunter
        ... From Grant s Memoirs: On the night of the 13th Johnston sent the following dispatch to Pemberton at Edward s station: I have lately arrived, and learn
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007
          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I'm sorry to say I should get a little more background on the "order
          > to attack Sherman at Clinton" and what that strategy even was.
          >
          > I'll try to look that up but perhaps someone can also explain?
          >

          From Grant's Memoirs:

          "On the night of the 13th Johnston sent the following dispatch to
          Pemberton at Edward's station: "I have lately arrived, and learn that
          Major-General Sherman is between us with four divisions at Clinton.
          It is important to establish communication, that you may be
          reinforced. If practicable, come up in his rear at once. To beat such
          a detachment would be of immense value. All the troops you can
          quickly assemble should be brought. Time is all-important." This
          dispatch was sent in triplicate, by different messengers. One of the
          messengers happened to be a loyal man who had been expelled from
          Memphis some months before by Hurlbut for uttering disloyal and
          threatening sentiments. There was a good deal of parade about his
          expulsion, ostensibly as a warning to those who entertained the
          sentiments he expressed; but Hurlbut and the expelled man understood
          each other. He delivered his copy of Johnston's dispatch to McPherson
          who forwarded it to me."

          Johnston's Memoirs state specifically that Johnston handed the
          message to Capt. Yerger to deliver to Pemberton's HQ. Yerger further
          explained that he rode all night (the creeks had all been swollen by
          rain) trying to find Pemberton's HQ and finally decided to call it
          quits and rent a room in a local inn, where he finally handed the
          message off to a Pemberton staffer who was staying in the same inn.

          The same Captain Yerger showed up mysteriously at Raymond just before
          the battle and assumed command of the cavalry, which remained
          unengaged all day on the Port Gibson road.

          Just an interesting coincidence (?).
        • Carl Williams
          I can see you can t comprehend the density of my ignorance. But I have boned up on it and get it a little better. Sherman came up may 7th with a corps: Clinton
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007
            I can see you can't comprehend the density of my ignorance.

            But I have boned up on it and get it a little better. Sherman came up
            may 7th with a corps: Clinton is roughly somewhat east of Raymond
            where there was that battle of the 12th or so.

            Somehow I thought sherman was not in the area till much later.
          • Tony Gunter
            ... up ... Oh, sorry! On May 12, McClernand was due south of Edwards at Mt. Moriah, Sherman was five miles east at Dillon s, and McPherson was 7 miles east of
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007
              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I can see you can't comprehend the density of my ignorance.
              >
              > But I have boned up on it and get it a little better. Sherman came
              up
              > may 7th with a corps: Clinton is roughly somewhat east of Raymond
              > where there was that battle of the 12th or so.
              >
              > Somehow I thought sherman was not in the area till much later.

              Oh, sorry! On May 12, McClernand was due south of Edwards at Mt.
              Moriah, Sherman was five miles east at Dillon's, and McPherson was 7
              miles east of that at Raymond.

              Grant's plan had been for McPherson to operate independently against
              Jackson while McClernand and Sherman's corps operated against
              Pemberton's main body. However, McPherson's report that he had faced
              about 6,000 men at Raymond, all of whom were falling back to the
              entrenchments at Jackson, changed Grant's plan. McClernand had the
              seige guns, and McPherson's men alone (12,000) didn't have the
              strength to face an entrenched foe of 6000 plus whatever
              reinforcements had arrived, so Grant turned his entire force towards
              Jackson on the night of the 12th. On the 13th, McPherson started for
              Clinton with one division, and continued to skirmish towards
              Mississippi Springs with the other. Sherman then assumed the drive
              on Jackson through Mississippi Springs, at which point Gregg's force
              retreated into Jackson and McPherson's displaced division rejoined
              him in Clinton. McClernand carried up the rear moving within
              supporting distance of both Sherman and McPherson.

              Somehow, all of this translated to "Sherman has four divisions at
              Clinton" after being digested through Johnston's intel apparatus.
            • Carl Williams
              http://www.dean.usma.edu/history/web03/atlases/american_civil_war/html/acw20.html found this map which helps [these maps can be found in our links btw]
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007
                http://www.dean.usma.edu/history/web03/atlases/american_civil_war/html/acw20.html


                found this map which helps [these maps can be found in our links btw]
              • keeno2@aol.com
                Excellent map, Carl. Thanx. Ken ************************************** See what s free at http://www.aol.com.
                Message 7 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007
                  Excellent map, Carl. Thanx.
                   
                  Ken




                  See what's free at AOL.com.
                • Carl Williams
                  the west point map links have been a bit slippery [links go bad] but sure are great... you and fran are welcome, I ll try to keep those links in order. ...
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007
                    the west point map links have been a bit slippery [links go bad] but
                    sure are great... you and fran are welcome, I'll try to keep those
                    links in order.



                    --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
                    >
                    > Excellent map, Carl. Thanx.
                    >
                    > Ken
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ************************************** See what's free at
                    http://www.aol.com
                    >
                  • Carl Williams
                    getting back to the original question, I have to think this Yerger had some kind of a wierd story here. Calls it quits and just hands it off to somebody... I d
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007
                      getting back to the original question, I have to think this Yerger had
                      some kind of a wierd story here. Calls it quits and just hands it off
                      to somebody... I'd think you could get executed for mis-handling
                      something like that.
                      Did he name this Pemberton aide?

                      > However, General Johnston's memoirs specifically state that he gave
                      > the message only to Capt. Yerger, who said that he tried nearly all
                      > night to find Pemberton's HQ but, exhausted, decided to call it quits
                      > for the night and rent a room at a local inn. Yerger claimed that he
                      > handed the message off to a Pemberton staffer that was staying at the
                      > same inn ... and of course, the message ended up in McPherson's
                      > hands.
                      >
                    • Tony Gunter
                      ... No.
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007
                        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > getting back to the original question, I have to think this Yerger had
                        > some kind of a wierd story here. Calls it quits and just hands it off
                        > to somebody... I'd think you could get executed for mis-handling
                        > something like that.
                        > Did he name this Pemberton aide?

                        No.
                      • Tony Gunter
                        ... http://www.dean.usma.edu/history/web03/atlases/american_civil_war/html/a cw20.html ... That s a pretty nice map, but it gives Pemberton a little too much
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007
                          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          http://www.dean.usma.edu/history/web03/atlases/american_civil_war/html/a
                          cw20.html
                          >
                          >
                          > found this map which helps [these maps can be found in our links btw]
                          >

                          That's a pretty nice map, but it gives Pemberton a little too much
                          credit for how far he moved between the 12th and the 16th (answer:
                          about five miles).
                        • Tom Mix
                          Thanks, Carl. I m heading down to Ft. Donelson next week and used it for that. Tom ... From: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com [mailto:civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com]
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007

                            Thanks, Carl. I’m heading down to Ft. Donelson next week and used it for that.

                            Tom

                             

                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com [mailto:civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Carl Williams
                            Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2007 8:48 PM
                            To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: For the conspiracy theorists ...

                             

                            the west point map links have been a bit slippery [links go bad] but
                            sure are great... you and fran are welcome, I'll try to keep those
                            links in order.

                            --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, keeno2@... wrote:

                            >
                            > Excellent map, Carl. Thanx.
                            >
                            > Ken
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > ************ ********* ********* ******** See what's free at
                            http://www.aol. com.
                            >

                          • Tony Gunter
                            ... infamous attack ... in ... quits ... the ... Interestingly enough, the Yergers were very prominent and passionate Unionists.
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jun 26, 2007
                              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Gunter" <tony_gunter@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > General Grant reports that General Johnston gave his
                              infamous "attack
                              > Sherman at Clinton" order to three riders, one of which was a
                              > Unionist spy who had been very publicly run out of town in Memphis
                              in
                              > 1862.
                              >
                              > However, General Johnston's memoirs specifically state that he gave
                              > the message only to Capt. Yerger, who said that he tried nearly all
                              > night to find Pemberton's HQ but, exhausted, decided to call it
                              quits
                              > for the night and rent a room at a local inn. Yerger claimed that he
                              > handed the message off to a Pemberton staffer that was staying at
                              the
                              > same inn ... and of course, the message ended up in McPherson's
                              > hands.
                              >
                              > Previously, the same Capt. Yerger had arrived in Raymond around 3
                              > a.m. and took command of the squadron of Wirt Adams' men who were
                              > supposed to be patrolling the roads towards Utica and Port Gibson.
                              > Yerger ends up conveniently unengaged on the Port Gibson road all
                              > day, and Wirt Adams, who had been ordered to move with his entire
                              > force to Raymond, does not show up with his force of 1300 men (Wirt
                              > Adams' cavalry plus nearly 500 men of the 20th Mississippi Mounted
                              > Infantry) until the Confederate force is in full retreat.
                              >
                              > The bottom line is that Capt. Yerger ends up connected to McPherson
                              > during two of the campaign's most critical turning points: Raymond
                              > and Champion Hill.
                              >

                              Interestingly enough, the Yergers were very prominent and passionate
                              Unionists.
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