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Two William Andersons

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  • franbolton
    Census records are the single most valuable tool one has today to pinpoint ancestors, and their FAMILY GROUP, at a certain time and place in the past. While
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 15, 2007
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      Census records are the single most valuable tool one has today to
      pinpoint ancestors, and their FAMILY GROUP, at a certain time and
      place in the past.
      While some may consider them "insignificant", they are certainly
      significant enough to have proven that William Columbus Anderson who
      died in 1927 in Brownwood TX, and William T "Bloody Bill" Anderson,
      who was killed in 1864 in MO, are two separate and distinct
      individuals.
      They show both men had separate and distinct family groups, before,
      during, and after Bloody Bill's death.
      Therefore, it is not possible for them to have become one, after
      Bloody Bill's death.
      After William Columbus Anderson of Brownwood claimed he was Bloody
      Bill to a local newspaper in 1924, an attempt was made to verify that
      statement. Had the records we have access to today, specifically the
      census records, been available at that time, it would have been
      proven immediately that he was not.
      William T "Bloody Bill" Anderson, who rode with Quantrill in MO, and
      wintered in Sherman, Grayson Co, TX stated his name was Lieutenant
      William T Anderson on his March 1864 Sherman, Grayson Co TX marriage
      license to Miss Bush Smith. If he didn't know his name, who would?
      While no one disputes that William Columbus Anderson of Brownwood
      Texas CLAIMED he was Bloody Bill, it has been proven his claim was
      false.
      "Twisting" records was not necessary, or even considered.
      If ALL available evidence is considered, then that evidence will fall
      into place like pieces of a puzzle, and will speak for itself.
      Sincerely,
      Fran Bolton
    • Jay Longley
      Maybe you will like to tell the members where Colonel William C. Anderson s death certificate vanished to. While you are at it, also explain where Brownwood s
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 15, 2007
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        Maybe you will like to tell the members where Colonel William C.
        Anderson's death certificate vanished to. While you are at it, also
        explain where Brownwood's greatest leader Henry Ford's went to.
        Henry Ford was one of Bloody Bill Anderson's closest confidants after
        the War.
        ~Jay~



        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "franbolton" <franbolton@...>
        wrote:
        >
        >
        > Census records are the single most valuable tool one has today to
        > pinpoint ancestors, and their FAMILY GROUP, at a certain time and
        > place in the past.
        > While some may consider them "insignificant", they are certainly
        > significant enough to have proven that William Columbus Anderson
        who
        > died in 1927 in Brownwood TX, and William T "Bloody Bill" Anderson,
        > who was killed in 1864 in MO, are two separate and distinct
        > individuals.
        > They show both men had separate and distinct family groups, before,
        > during, and after Bloody Bill's death.
        > Therefore, it is not possible for them to have become one, after
        > Bloody Bill's death.
        > After William Columbus Anderson of Brownwood claimed he was Bloody
        > Bill to a local newspaper in 1924, an attempt was made to verify
        that
        > statement. Had the records we have access to today, specifically
        the
        > census records, been available at that time, it would have been
        > proven immediately that he was not.
        > William T "Bloody Bill" Anderson, who rode with Quantrill in MO,
        and
        > wintered in Sherman, Grayson Co, TX stated his name was Lieutenant
        > William T Anderson on his March 1864 Sherman, Grayson Co TX
        marriage
        > license to Miss Bush Smith. If he didn't know his name, who would?
        > While no one disputes that William Columbus Anderson of Brownwood
        > Texas CLAIMED he was Bloody Bill, it has been proven his claim was
        > false.
        > "Twisting" records was not necessary, or even considered.
        > If ALL available evidence is considered, then that evidence will
        fall
        > into place like pieces of a puzzle, and will speak for itself.
        > Sincerely,
        > Fran Bolton
        >
      • franbolton
        I have no knowledge of where William C Anderson s death certificate vanished to . Perhaps that resulted as part of the attempt to prove his claim he was the
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 16, 2007
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          I have no knowledge of where William C Anderson's death certificate
          "vanished to". Perhaps that resulted as part of the attempt to prove his
          claim he was the actual Bloody Bill of Quantrill's band of guerrillas in
          MO during the Civil War, in his 1924 newspaper interview in Brownwood
          TX. I have been informed that the page where it would have been recorded
          was "torn out". (IF one was ever issued. He died during the wee hours,
          and was buried the next day. This was during the years when death
          certificates were not consistently used in Brown Co TX)

          I have no knowledge of Henry Brown, or his death certificate.

          Is William C Anderson's death certificate available in your files?

          Sincerely, Fran Bolton
          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Maybe you will like to tell the members where Colonel William C.
          > Anderson's death certificate vanished to. While you are at it, also
          > explain where Brownwood's greatest leader Henry Ford's went to.
          > Henry Ford was one of Bloody Bill Anderson's closest confidants after
          > the War.
          > ~Jay~
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "franbolton" franbolton@
          > wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Census records are the single most valuable tool one has today to
          > > pinpoint ancestors, and their FAMILY GROUP, at a certain time and
          > > place in the past.
          > > While some may consider them "insignificant", they are certainly
          > > significant enough to have proven that William Columbus Anderson
          > who
          > > died in 1927 in Brownwood TX, and William T "Bloody Bill" Anderson,
          > > who was killed in 1864 in MO, are two separate and distinct
          > > individuals.
          > > They show both men had separate and distinct family groups, before,
          > > during, and after Bloody Bill's death.
          > > Therefore, it is not possible for them to have become one, after
          > > Bloody Bill's death.
          > > After William Columbus Anderson of Brownwood claimed he was Bloody
          > > Bill to a local newspaper in 1924, an attempt was made to verify
          > that
          > > statement. Had the records we have access to today, specifically
          > the
          > > census records, been available at that time, it would have been
          > > proven immediately that he was not.
          > > William T "Bloody Bill" Anderson, who rode with Quantrill in MO,
          > and
          > > wintered in Sherman, Grayson Co, TX stated his name was Lieutenant
          > > William T Anderson on his March 1864 Sherman, Grayson Co TX
          > marriage
          > > license to Miss Bush Smith. If he didn't know his name, who would?
          > > While no one disputes that William Columbus Anderson of Brownwood
          > > Texas CLAIMED he was Bloody Bill, it has been proven his claim was
          > > false.
          > > "Twisting" records was not necessary, or even considered.
          > > If ALL available evidence is considered, then that evidence will
          > fall
          > > into place like pieces of a puzzle, and will speak for itself.
          > > Sincerely,
          > > Fran Bolton
          > >
          >
        • Chuck Rabas
          Fran, In my decades of research, I have yet to find even a hint of evidence that Wm. C. Anderson was associated with any group of guerrillas, let alone the
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 16, 2007
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            Fran,
            In my decades of research, I have yet to find even a hint of evidence that Wm. C. Anderson was associated with any group of guerrillas, let alone the better-known ones of Quantrill, Thrailkill, Thornton, Gordon, Todd, Wm. T. Anderson, etc.
            There is documentation, however, that Wm. C. Anderson killed a Unionist in Stone County, Missouri and fled to Texas.  A few years ago, I had an extended correspondence with the g-g-grandson of the victim of that encounter.
            Chuck Rabas


            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "franbolton" <franbolton@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > I have no knowledge of where William C Anderson's death certificate
            > "vanished to". Perhaps that resulted as part of the attempt to prove his
            > claim he was the actual Bloody Bill of Quantrill's band of guerrillas in
            > MO during the Civil War, in his 1924 newspaper interview in Brownwood
            > TX. I have been informed that the page where it would have been recorded
            > was "torn out". (IF one was ever issued. He died during the wee hours,
            > and was buried the next day. This was during the years when death
            > certificates were not consistently used in Brown Co TX)
            >
            > I have no knowledge of Henry Brown, or his death certificate.
            >
            > Is William C Anderson's death certificate available in your files?
            >
            > Sincerely, Fran Bolton

          • franbolton
            Chuck, then there is no verification of his being a Colonel? In awarding pensions for Confederate service, Texas, like most other southern states, confined
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 16, 2007
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              Chuck, then there is no verification of his being a Colonel?

              "In awarding pensions for Confederate service, Texas, like most other southern states, confined its relief payments to veterans or their widows resident in Texas since 1880 who were disabled or indigent. Therefore, the index of applicants for Confederate pensions in no way represents a complete roster of Texas residents who had fought for the Confederacy."

              Source:  http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/pensions/introcpi.html

              Sincerely,

              Fran Bolton

              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck Rabas" <c_r_rabas@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Fran,
              > In my decades of research, I have yet to find even a hint of evidence
              > that Wm. C. Anderson was associated with any group of guerrillas, let
              > alone the better-known ones of Quantrill, Thrailkill, Thornton, Gordon,
              > Todd, Wm. T. Anderson, etc.
              > There is documentation, however, that Wm. C. Anderson killed a Unionist
              > in Stone County, Missouri and fled to Texas. A few years ago, I had an
              > extended correspondence with the g-g-grandson of the victim of that
              > encounter.
              > Chuck Rabas
              >
              >
              > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "franbolton" franbolton@
              > wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > I have no knowledge of where William C Anderson's death certificate
              > > "vanished to". Perhaps that resulted as part of the attempt to prove
              > his
              > > claim he was the actual Bloody Bill of Quantrill's band of guerrillas
              > in
              > > MO during the Civil War, in his 1924 newspaper interview in Brownwood
              > > TX. I have been informed that the page where it would have been
              > recorded
              > > was "torn out". (IF one was ever issued. He died during the wee hours,
              > > and was buried the next day. This was during the years when death
              > > certificates were not consistently used in Brown Co TX)
              > >
              > > I have no knowledge of Henry Brown, or his death certificate.
              > >
              > > Is William C Anderson's death certificate available in your files?
              > >
              > > Sincerely, Fran Bolton
              >

            • Chuck Rabas
              Fran, In March, 1864, he gave his name on his marriage license as Lieut. William T. Anderson. The orders from Gen. Price that were found on his body in Oct.,
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 20, 2007
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                Fran,
                In March, 1864, he gave his name on his marriage license as Lieut.
                William T. Anderson. The orders from Gen. Price that were found on
                his body in Oct., 1864 were addressed to Captain Wm. Anderson. The
                only indication of him being a colonel was that one of his men was
                heard by Sgt. Goodman (a Union soldier held captive in Sept., 1864 by
                Anderson following Centralia) to address Anderson as Colonel --
                pretty flimsy evidence in my book.
                Chuck Rabas

                --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "franbolton" <franbolton@...>
                wrote:
                >
                >
                > Chuck, then there is no verification of his being a Colonel?
                >
                > "In awarding pensions for Confederate service, Texas, like most
                other
                > southern states, confined its relief payments to veterans or their
                > widows resident in Texas since 1880 who were disabled or indigent.
                > Therefore, the index of applicants for Confederate pensions in no
                way
                > represents a complete roster of Texas residents who had fought for
                the
                > Confederacy."
                >
                > Source: http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/pensions/introcpi.html
                > <http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/pensions/introcpi.html>
                >
                > Sincerely,
                >
                > Fran Bolton
                > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck Rabas" <c_r_rabas@>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > Fran,
                > > In my decades of research, I have yet to find even a hint of
                evidence
                > > that Wm. C. Anderson was associated with any group of guerrillas,
                let
                > > alone the better-known ones of Quantrill, Thrailkill, Thornton,
                > Gordon,
                > > Todd, Wm. T. Anderson, etc.
                > > There is documentation, however, that Wm. C. Anderson killed a
                > Unionist
                > > in Stone County, Missouri and fled to Texas. A few years ago, I
                had an
                > > extended correspondence with the g-g-grandson of the victim of
                that
                > > encounter.
                > > Chuck Rabas
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