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Gunshots they claim killed Bill Anderson.

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  • Jay Longley
    One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the Bloody Bill Anderson story has been presented by historians and writers for over 140 years, has been the
    Message 1 of 29 , Apr 27, 2007
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      One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the Bloody Bill
      Anderson story has been presented by historians and writers for over
      140 years, has been the many contradictory accounts of both the
      number of gunshots and the location of gunshot wounds these writers
      claim killed Bloody Bill Anderson in the ambush near Orrick, Missouri
      on October 26th or 27th depending on which story you believe. Going
      back through my notes on this event, I came across over a dozen
      different and contradictory stories of both the number of gunshots
      this guerrilla was said to have taken and their location on the body.
      The contradictions are quite obvious and the differences are as
      numerous as the writers who told about these very important gunshots.
      If one accepts that Bloody Bill Anderson was killed in this ambush,
      which I don't, then it must be amply certain that only one of these
      reports can possibly be the true account. I will give you all just a
      sampling of these accounts and will leave it up to those who have
      written and published these opposing versions to explain their
      positions and give their sources.
      ****

      The following article was written, on October 8, 1989, by Lorene
      Bishop who was a writer for the Brownwood Bulletin and President of
      the Brown County Historical Society. Lorene Bishop, as almost every
      reputable Brown County historian believed firmly that Bloody Bill
      Anderson lived out his life in Brown County, Texas until his death in
      1927. I am posting only the portion of Bishop's book that deals with
      the ambush below as told by James S. Hackley:

      "... The existence of the Bill Anderson of Texas that became known to
      Missourians in 1924 when a short article about him appeared in The
      Houston Post and was copied in Missouri papers. At once Colonel
      James S. Hackley, an early settler of Mobeby Missouri present his
      knowledge of the facts preceeding the slaying. His story indicates
      that the guerrilla's body was identified by his, Hackley's mother, a
      cousin of the slain Confederate irregular...
      Four weeks later we drove to Richmond to my mother's brother. When
      my uncle came out to greet my mother, a boy ran up and said that Bill
      Anderson had been killed and his body was at Tice's gallery.
      We went to Tice's gallery. When my mother saw the blood on
      Anderson's face, and his clotted hair, she pleaded that the picture
      not be taken until she had washed his face and combed his hair. Her
      plea was refused by Captain Cox, who was present and claimed to have
      killed Anderson.
      Anderson was buried in Richmond. The bullet that ended his life
      struck him in the back of his head and came out through his
      forehead.' "

      (This account says ONE bullet "struck him in the back of the head and
      came out through his forehead.")
      ***

      This next account is from the War of the Rebellion Records and comes
      from no other that Lt. Colonel S.P. Cox himself.

      "Report of Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Cox, Thirty-third Infanty Enrolled
      Missouri Militia.
      Richmond, Mo., October 27, 1864.

      DEAR SIR: We have the honor to report the result of our expedition on
      yesterday against the notorious bushwhacker, William T. Anderson and
      his forces, near Albany, in the soutwest corner of this county (Ray).
      Learning his whereabouts we struck camp on yesterday morning
      and made a forced march and came in contact with their pickets about
      a mile this side of Albany; drove them in and through Albany and into
      the woods beyond. We dismounted our men in the town, threw our
      infantry force into the woods beyond, sending a cavalry advance who
      engaged the enemy and fell back, when Anderson and his fiendish gang,
      about 300 strong, raised the Indian yell and came in full speed upon
      our lines, shooting and yelling as they came. Our lines held their
      position without a break.The notorious bushwhacker, Anderson, and one
      of his men, supposed to be Captain Rains, son of General Rains,
      charged through our lines. Anderson was killed and fell some fifty
      steps in our rear, receiving two balls in the side of the head. Rains
      made his escape and their forces retreated in full speed, being
      completely routed; our cavalry pursued them some ten miles, finding
      the road strewn with blood for miles. We hear of them scattered in
      various directions, some considerable force of them making thier way
      toward Richfield, in Clay County. We capured on Anderson private
      papers and orders from General Price that identify him beyond a
      doubt.
      I have the honor to report that my officers and me conducted
      themselves well and fought bravely on the field. We had 4 men
      wounded; lost none. The forces of my command consisted of a portion
      of Major Grimes, of Ray County, Fifty first Regiment Enrolled
      Missouri Militia, and a portion of the Thirty-Third Enrolled Missouri
      Militia, from Daviess and Caldwell Counties.

      Respectfully yours,

      S.P. COX
      Lieut. Col., Comdg. Thirty-third Regt. Enrolled Missouri
      Militia.
      GENERAL CRAIG

      (This one claims Anderson was hit with "two balls in the side of the
      head." Quite a feat of markmanship I would say.)

      ***
      The next is from a message by one of the members of our Bloody Bill
      Anderson Mystery group, Laura Anderson Way, in which she quotes Paul
      Petersen.

      "The following is from the book "Quantrill of Missouri" by Paul
      Petersen, page 392 and 393."

      "In late October, in Ray County, Anderson saw the report that Price
      had been defeated and that George Todd had been killed. On October 24
      he determined to punish the Federals for the Southern defeat at
      Westport."

      "Harrison Trow recalled that William Smith, a veteran guerrilla with
      four years' experience, rode next to Anderson. Trow claimed that five
      bullets struck Smith and three struck Anderson, and at the end of the
      fight, both men were dead."

      (Here Trow is quoted as saying "three (bullets) struck Anderson.
      Another strange fact is that, while this report claims William Smith
      was killed in this ambush, Smith's name appears nowhere on the
      monument erected to the guerrillas killed that day.)

      ***
      From: http://www.history.com/tdih.do?action=tdihArticleYear&id=2366

      "...Anderson went to Texas that winter, got married, and returned to
      Missouri in 1864 with a band of about 50 fighters. Anderson embarked
      on a summer of violence, leading his group on a campaign that killed
      hundreds and caused extensive damage. The climax came on September 27
      when Anderson's gang joined with several others to pillage the town
      of Centralia, Missouri. When more than 100 Union soldiers pursued
      them, the guerillas ambushed and massacred the entire detachment.
      Just a month later, Anderson's band was caught in a Union ambush
      outside of Albany, Missouri, and Anderson was killed by two bullets
      to his head. The body of the "blood-drenched savage," as he became
      known in the area, was placed on public display. Anderson kept a rope
      to record his killings, and there were 54 knots in it at the time of
      his death..."

      ***

      From:
      http://www.bullshido.net/modules. php?
      name=Reviews& file=viewarticle &id=291

      Adult language is used on that site.

      "...After completely decimating the town, he moved his men to the
      south of town and set up an ambush for 150 Union Calvary men moving
      in after him. They killed 116 of them. They shot them through the
      head, then scalped them and thrust them with bayonets. They even
      chopped of ears and noses.

      On October 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox and
      his Union troops. He and one other man charged the line guns blazing.
      His horse was shot and he bit the dust, he was then shot in the back
      of the head 2 times. His body was taken to Richmond, Missouri where
      they decapitated his corpse and stuck his head on a telegraph pole.
      His body was then dragged through the streets and dumped in an
      unmarked grave.

      Bloody Bill was passionate, angry and ruthless ~ described by Jim
      Cummins as "The most desperate man I ever met." "

      (This one seems to be saying Anderson's horse "bit the dust" and then
      Anderson was executed with two shots in the back of the head.)

      ***

      http://www.civilwarhistory.com/quantrill/anderson.htm

      "While leading his guerilla band near Orrick, Missouri on October
      27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox and his Union
      troops. Anderson was caught completely unaware and was riddled with
      bullets then left for dead in his saddle. His loyal followers put up
      a fight to try and recover Anderson's corpse, but they were driven
      back by superior firepower.

      Anderson's body was taken to Richmond, Missouri where it was propped
      up in a chair and a pistol was placed in the dead man's hand then
      photographs were taken. A short while later, the Union troopers, full
      of loathing for the dead man, decapitated Anderson and impaled his
      head on a telegraph pole at the entrance to the town as a signature
      to all that the infamous killer was indeed dead. Anderson's torso was
      roped and tied to a horse then dragged along the streets of Richmond
      before being dumped in an unmarked grave outside of town."

      (This is just one of many accounts that claim that Bill Anderson's
      body was "riddled with bullets".)

      ***

      Carl W. Breihan tells the story a little different in his account
      from page 78 of his "Killer Legions of Quantrill", 1971, by saying
      the following:

      "...Anderson was the first to fall, his body caught in a crossfire
      and riddled as he toppled from the saddle..."

      ***

      If it weren't for the seriousness of this historical event, all of
      these different and contradictory accounts would be laughable. To say
      the least, EVERY writer who has made money selling books containing a
      version of this ambush story owes the American public an explanation
      for writing whatever tale he/she chose to tell in the book(s),
      regarding the way they claim Bloody Bill Anderson was killed that
      day. They should step forward and give their sources for this
      misinformation.
      Thank you,
      ~Jay~
    • Carl Williams
      Jay, I would be the first to say maybe you re right, so let me say that and get it out of the way. Thanks, too, for taking the trouble to post all this and I
      Message 2 of 29 , Apr 28, 2007
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        Jay, I would be the first to say "maybe you're right," so let me say
        that and get it out of the way. Thanks, too, for taking the trouble to
        post all this and I don't see why Bloody Bill wouldnt be a good topic
        for us.

        I'd just say that anyone who would want to explore further whether
        Anderson was killed as reported should consider:

        *it seems to be the case that it is appealing to believe that accepted
        or official accounts may be wrong. Thus many famous people are doomed
        to be accused of living longer than history would allow; Hitler,
        Dillinger, Booth, even JFK. I think anyone has to ask himself whether
        this appeal is just playing a large role.

        *aiding this perhaps natural inclination is the fact that official
        accounts can have a lot of problems. This may be presented as unusual
        but is actually the norm, IMO. Amazingly enough, any autopsy is as
        likely to add to the confusion as to clear anything up. In the case of
        JFK, Dillinger, and Booth [I believe] autopsies were botched to some
        degree or other. Dillinger's eye color is reported incorrectly,
        Booth's broken leg is incorrectly identified as on the wrong side [I
        believe], and don't even get me started on JFK's autopsy. You'd think
        the people doing autopsies would be competent. NO.

        *I've also noted that if you read a book presenting one view, you
        forget you are reading a manipulated thing; you want to trust the
        author. It is very helpful to read a book presenting the opposite
        view, always eye-opening.

        *Lastly, one must factor the credibility of the claim the surviving
        person and those hiding them could really be able to keep it all
        secret, none defecting to expose the 'truth.'

        Check out civil war talk radio and booth. I havent listened to the
        whole thing, but the author is able to question the account that
        Booth's leg was broken at Ford's [that's as far as I got].
        Below, a wikipedia thing on Booth.
        Carl


        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wilkes_Booth

        An early popularizer of "Booth Escaped" theories was Finis L. Bates
        who claimed to have met Booth in Granbury, Texas in the 1870s and
        later to have taken possession of Booth's body after his suicide in
        Enid, Oklahoma in 1903. He toured the mummified body in carnival
        sideshows and wrote The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth (1908)
        in order to authenticate the mummy.

        Some believe that Booth escaped the tobacco barn at Garrett's farm,
        with a look-alike double agent named James William Boyd dying in his
        place, and the government going to great pains to cover up the
        blunder. These theories are seen by most historians as having no
        substance.

        The Lincoln Conspiracy (ISBN 1-56849-531-5) details the assassination,
        the Boyd plot, and Booth's escape to the swamps. The Curse of Cain:
        The Untold Story of John Wilkes Booth (ISBN 1-58006-021-8) continues
        with the claim that Booth escaped, sought refuge in Japan and
        eventually returned to the United States where he died in Enid,
        Oklahoma in 1903. Another is that a man claiming to be Booth lived
        into the 1900s in Missouri. In recent years, attempts to exhume the
        grave where Booth is presumed buried in order to compare it with DNA
        of living relatives have been blocked by Baltimore county judges, the
        Maryland Court of Special Appeals, and members of the family, leaving
        the question of escape open to theory.[7] FBI records made public give
        no information to support the escape theory, however.[8]

        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the Bloody Bill
        > Anderson story has been presented by historians and writers for over
        > 140 years, has been the many contradictory accounts of both the
        > number of gunshots and the location of gunshot wounds these writers
        > claim killed Bloody Bill Anderson in the ambush near Orrick, Missouri
        > on October 26th or 27th depending on which story you believe. Going
        > back through my notes on this event, I came across over a dozen
        > different and contradictory stories of both the number of gunshots
        > this guerrilla was said to have taken and their location on the body.
        > The contradictions are quite obvious and the differences are as
        > numerous as the writers who told about these very important gunshots.
        > If one accepts that Bloody Bill Anderson was killed in this ambush,
        > which I don't, then it must be amply certain that only one of these
        > reports can possibly be the true account. I will give you all just a
        > sampling of these accounts and will leave it up to those who have
        > written and published these opposing versions to explain their
        > positions and give their sources.
        > ****
        >
        > The following article was written, on October 8, 1989, by Lorene
        > Bishop who was a writer for the Brownwood Bulletin and President of
        > the Brown County Historical Society. Lorene Bishop, as almost every
        > reputable Brown County historian believed firmly that Bloody Bill
        > Anderson lived out his life in Brown County, Texas until his death in
        > 1927. I am posting only the portion of Bishop's book that deals with
        > the ambush below as told by James S. Hackley:
        >
        > "... The existence of the Bill Anderson of Texas that became known to
        > Missourians in 1924 when a short article about him appeared in The
        > Houston Post and was copied in Missouri papers. At once Colonel
        > James S. Hackley, an early settler of Mobeby Missouri present his
        > knowledge of the facts preceeding the slaying. His story indicates
        > that the guerrilla's body was identified by his, Hackley's mother, a
        > cousin of the slain Confederate irregular...
        > Four weeks later we drove to Richmond to my mother's brother. When
        > my uncle came out to greet my mother, a boy ran up and said that Bill
        > Anderson had been killed and his body was at Tice's gallery.
        > We went to Tice's gallery. When my mother saw the blood on
        > Anderson's face, and his clotted hair, she pleaded that the picture
        > not be taken until she had washed his face and combed his hair. Her
        > plea was refused by Captain Cox, who was present and claimed to have
        > killed Anderson.
        > Anderson was buried in Richmond. The bullet that ended his life
        > struck him in the back of his head and came out through his
        > forehead.' "
        >
        > (This account says ONE bullet "struck him in the back of the head and
        > came out through his forehead.")
        > ***
        >
        > This next account is from the War of the Rebellion Records and comes
        > from no other that Lt. Colonel S.P. Cox himself.
        >
        > "Report of Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Cox, Thirty-third Infanty Enrolled
        > Missouri Militia.
        > Richmond, Mo., October 27, 1864.
        >
        > DEAR SIR: We have the honor to report the result of our expedition on
        > yesterday against the notorious bushwhacker, William T. Anderson and
        > his forces, near Albany, in the soutwest corner of this county (Ray).
        > Learning his whereabouts we struck camp on yesterday morning
        > and made a forced march and came in contact with their pickets about
        > a mile this side of Albany; drove them in and through Albany and into
        > the woods beyond. We dismounted our men in the town, threw our
        > infantry force into the woods beyond, sending a cavalry advance who
        > engaged the enemy and fell back, when Anderson and his fiendish gang,
        > about 300 strong, raised the Indian yell and came in full speed upon
        > our lines, shooting and yelling as they came. Our lines held their
        > position without a break.The notorious bushwhacker, Anderson, and one
        > of his men, supposed to be Captain Rains, son of General Rains,
        > charged through our lines. Anderson was killed and fell some fifty
        > steps in our rear, receiving two balls in the side of the head. Rains
        > made his escape and their forces retreated in full speed, being
        > completely routed; our cavalry pursued them some ten miles, finding
        > the road strewn with blood for miles. We hear of them scattered in
        > various directions, some considerable force of them making thier way
        > toward Richfield, in Clay County. We capured on Anderson private
        > papers and orders from General Price that identify him beyond a
        > doubt.
        > I have the honor to report that my officers and me conducted
        > themselves well and fought bravely on the field. We had 4 men
        > wounded; lost none. The forces of my command consisted of a portion
        > of Major Grimes, of Ray County, Fifty first Regiment Enrolled
        > Missouri Militia, and a portion of the Thirty-Third Enrolled Missouri
        > Militia, from Daviess and Caldwell Counties.
        >
        > Respectfully yours,
        >
        > S.P. COX
        > Lieut. Col., Comdg. Thirty-third Regt. Enrolled Missouri
        > Militia.
        > GENERAL CRAIG
        >
        > (This one claims Anderson was hit with "two balls in the side of the
        > head." Quite a feat of markmanship I would say.)
        >
        > ***
        > The next is from a message by one of the members of our Bloody Bill
        > Anderson Mystery group, Laura Anderson Way, in which she quotes Paul
        > Petersen.
        >
        > "The following is from the book "Quantrill of Missouri" by Paul
        > Petersen, page 392 and 393."
        >
        > "In late October, in Ray County, Anderson saw the report that Price
        > had been defeated and that George Todd had been killed. On October 24
        > he determined to punish the Federals for the Southern defeat at
        > Westport."
        >
        > "Harrison Trow recalled that William Smith, a veteran guerrilla with
        > four years' experience, rode next to Anderson. Trow claimed that five
        > bullets struck Smith and three struck Anderson, and at the end of the
        > fight, both men were dead."
        >
        > (Here Trow is quoted as saying "three (bullets) struck Anderson.
        > Another strange fact is that, while this report claims William Smith
        > was killed in this ambush, Smith's name appears nowhere on the
        > monument erected to the guerrillas killed that day.)
        >
        > ***
        > From: http://www.history.com/tdih.do?action=tdihArticleYear&id=2366
        >
        > "...Anderson went to Texas that winter, got married, and returned to
        > Missouri in 1864 with a band of about 50 fighters. Anderson embarked
        > on a summer of violence, leading his group on a campaign that killed
        > hundreds and caused extensive damage. The climax came on September 27
        > when Anderson's gang joined with several others to pillage the town
        > of Centralia, Missouri. When more than 100 Union soldiers pursued
        > them, the guerillas ambushed and massacred the entire detachment.
        > Just a month later, Anderson's band was caught in a Union ambush
        > outside of Albany, Missouri, and Anderson was killed by two bullets
        > to his head. The body of the "blood-drenched savage," as he became
        > known in the area, was placed on public display. Anderson kept a rope
        > to record his killings, and there were 54 knots in it at the time of
        > his death..."
        >
        > ***
        >
        > From:
        > http://www.bullshido.net/modules. php?
        > name=Reviews& file=viewarticle &id=291
        >
        > Adult language is used on that site.
        >
        > "...After completely decimating the town, he moved his men to the
        > south of town and set up an ambush for 150 Union Calvary men moving
        > in after him. They killed 116 of them. They shot them through the
        > head, then scalped them and thrust them with bayonets. They even
        > chopped of ears and noses.
        >
        > On October 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox and
        > his Union troops. He and one other man charged the line guns blazing.
        > His horse was shot and he bit the dust, he was then shot in the back
        > of the head 2 times. His body was taken to Richmond, Missouri where
        > they decapitated his corpse and stuck his head on a telegraph pole.
        > His body was then dragged through the streets and dumped in an
        > unmarked grave.
        >
        > Bloody Bill was passionate, angry and ruthless ~ described by Jim
        > Cummins as "The most desperate man I ever met." "
        >
        > (This one seems to be saying Anderson's horse "bit the dust" and then
        > Anderson was executed with two shots in the back of the head.)
        >
        > ***
        >
        > http://www.civilwarhistory.com/quantrill/anderson.htm
        >
        > "While leading his guerilla band near Orrick, Missouri on October
        > 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox and his Union
        > troops. Anderson was caught completely unaware and was riddled with
        > bullets then left for dead in his saddle. His loyal followers put up
        > a fight to try and recover Anderson's corpse, but they were driven
        > back by superior firepower.
        >
        > Anderson's body was taken to Richmond, Missouri where it was propped
        > up in a chair and a pistol was placed in the dead man's hand then
        > photographs were taken. A short while later, the Union troopers, full
        > of loathing for the dead man, decapitated Anderson and impaled his
        > head on a telegraph pole at the entrance to the town as a signature
        > to all that the infamous killer was indeed dead. Anderson's torso was
        > roped and tied to a horse then dragged along the streets of Richmond
        > before being dumped in an unmarked grave outside of town."
        >
        > (This is just one of many accounts that claim that Bill Anderson's
        > body was "riddled with bullets".)
        >
        > ***
        >
        > Carl W. Breihan tells the story a little different in his account
        > from page 78 of his "Killer Legions of Quantrill", 1971, by saying
        > the following:
        >
        > "...Anderson was the first to fall, his body caught in a crossfire
        > and riddled as he toppled from the saddle..."
        >
        > ***
        >
        > If it weren't for the seriousness of this historical event, all of
        > these different and contradictory accounts would be laughable. To say
        > the least, EVERY writer who has made money selling books containing a
        > version of this ambush story owes the American public an explanation
        > for writing whatever tale he/she chose to tell in the book(s),
        > regarding the way they claim Bloody Bill Anderson was killed that
        > day. They should step forward and give their sources for this
        > misinformation.
        > Thank you,
        > ~Jay~
        >
      • James W. Durney
        You forgot Elvis in your list of famous people, Elvis sightings are right up there with UFOs. Shades of Men in Black . LOL ... to ... topic ... accepted ...
        Message 3 of 29 , Apr 28, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          You forgot Elvis in your list of famous people, Elvis sightings are
          right up there with UFOs. Shades of "Men in Black".

          LOL

          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Jay, I would be the first to say "maybe you're right," so let me say
          > that and get it out of the way. Thanks, too, for taking the trouble
          to
          > post all this and I don't see why Bloody Bill wouldnt be a good
          topic
          > for us.
          >
          > I'd just say that anyone who would want to explore further whether
          > Anderson was killed as reported should consider:
          >
          > *it seems to be the case that it is appealing to believe that
          accepted
          > or official accounts may be wrong. Thus many famous people are
          doomed
          > to be accused of living longer than history would allow; Hitler,
          > Dillinger, Booth, even JFK. I think anyone has to ask himself
          whether
          > this appeal is just playing a large role.
          >
          > *aiding this perhaps natural inclination is the fact that official
          > accounts can have a lot of problems. This may be presented as
          unusual
          > but is actually the norm, IMO. Amazingly enough, any autopsy is as
          > likely to add to the confusion as to clear anything up. In the case
          of
          > JFK, Dillinger, and Booth [I believe] autopsies were botched to some
          > degree or other. Dillinger's eye color is reported incorrectly,
          > Booth's broken leg is incorrectly identified as on the wrong side [I
          > believe], and don't even get me started on JFK's autopsy. You'd
          think
          > the people doing autopsies would be competent. NO.
          >
          > *I've also noted that if you read a book presenting one view, you
          > forget you are reading a manipulated thing; you want to trust the
          > author. It is very helpful to read a book presenting the opposite
          > view, always eye-opening.
          >
          > *Lastly, one must factor the credibility of the claim the surviving
          > person and those hiding them could really be able to keep it all
          > secret, none defecting to expose the 'truth.'
          >
          > Check out civil war talk radio and booth. I havent listened to the
          > whole thing, but the author is able to question the account that
          > Booth's leg was broken at Ford's [that's as far as I got].
          > Below, a wikipedia thing on Booth.
          > Carl
          >
          >
          > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wilkes_Booth
          >
          > An early popularizer of "Booth Escaped" theories was Finis L. Bates
          > who claimed to have met Booth in Granbury, Texas in the 1870s and
          > later to have taken possession of Booth's body after his suicide in
          > Enid, Oklahoma in 1903. He toured the mummified body in carnival
          > sideshows and wrote The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth
          (1908)
          > in order to authenticate the mummy.
          >
          > Some believe that Booth escaped the tobacco barn at Garrett's farm,
          > with a look-alike double agent named James William Boyd dying in his
          > place, and the government going to great pains to cover up the
          > blunder. These theories are seen by most historians as having no
          > substance.
          >
          > The Lincoln Conspiracy (ISBN 1-56849-531-5) details the
          assassination,
          > the Boyd plot, and Booth's escape to the swamps. The Curse of Cain:
          > The Untold Story of John Wilkes Booth (ISBN 1-58006-021-8) continues
          > with the claim that Booth escaped, sought refuge in Japan and
          > eventually returned to the United States where he died in Enid,
          > Oklahoma in 1903. Another is that a man claiming to be Booth lived
          > into the 1900s in Missouri. In recent years, attempts to exhume the
          > grave where Booth is presumed buried in order to compare it with DNA
          > of living relatives have been blocked by Baltimore county judges,
          the
          > Maryland Court of Special Appeals, and members of the family,
          leaving
          > the question of escape open to theory.[7] FBI records made public
          give
          > no information to support the escape theory, however.[8]
          >
          > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the Bloody Bill
          > > Anderson story has been presented by historians and writers for
          over
          > > 140 years, has been the many contradictory accounts of both the
          > > number of gunshots and the location of gunshot wounds these
          writers
          > > claim killed Bloody Bill Anderson in the ambush near Orrick,
          Missouri
          > > on October 26th or 27th depending on which story you believe.
          Going
          > > back through my notes on this event, I came across over a dozen
          > > different and contradictory stories of both the number of
          gunshots
          > > this guerrilla was said to have taken and their location on the
          body.
          > > The contradictions are quite obvious and the differences are as
          > > numerous as the writers who told about these very important
          gunshots.
          > > If one accepts that Bloody Bill Anderson was killed in this
          ambush,
          > > which I don't, then it must be amply certain that only one of
          these
          > > reports can possibly be the true account. I will give you all
          just a
          > > sampling of these accounts and will leave it up to those who have
          > > written and published these opposing versions to explain their
          > > positions and give their sources.
          > > ****
          > >
          > > The following article was written, on October 8, 1989, by Lorene
          > > Bishop who was a writer for the Brownwood Bulletin and President
          of
          > > the Brown County Historical Society. Lorene Bishop, as almost
          every
          > > reputable Brown County historian believed firmly that Bloody Bill
          > > Anderson lived out his life in Brown County, Texas until his
          death in
          > > 1927. I am posting only the portion of Bishop's book that deals
          with
          > > the ambush below as told by James S. Hackley:
          > >
          > > "... The existence of the Bill Anderson of Texas that became
          known to
          > > Missourians in 1924 when a short article about him appeared in
          The
          > > Houston Post and was copied in Missouri papers. At once Colonel
          > > James S. Hackley, an early settler of Mobeby Missouri present his
          > > knowledge of the facts preceeding the slaying. His story
          indicates
          > > that the guerrilla's body was identified by his, Hackley's
          mother, a
          > > cousin of the slain Confederate irregular...
          > > Four weeks later we drove to Richmond to my mother's brother.
          When
          > > my uncle came out to greet my mother, a boy ran up and said that
          Bill
          > > Anderson had been killed and his body was at Tice's gallery.
          > > We went to Tice's gallery. When my mother saw the blood on
          > > Anderson's face, and his clotted hair, she pleaded that the
          picture
          > > not be taken until she had washed his face and combed his hair.
          Her
          > > plea was refused by Captain Cox, who was present and claimed to
          have
          > > killed Anderson.
          > > Anderson was buried in Richmond. The bullet that ended his life
          > > struck him in the back of his head and came out through his
          > > forehead.' "
          > >
          > > (This account says ONE bullet "struck him in the back of the head
          and
          > > came out through his forehead.")
          > > ***
          > >
          > > This next account is from the War of the Rebellion Records and
          comes
          > > from no other that Lt. Colonel S.P. Cox himself.
          > >
          > > "Report of Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Cox, Thirty-third Infanty
          Enrolled
          > > Missouri Militia.
          > > Richmond, Mo., October 27, 1864.
          > >
          > > DEAR SIR: We have the honor to report the result of our
          expedition on
          > > yesterday against the notorious bushwhacker, William T. Anderson
          and
          > > his forces, near Albany, in the soutwest corner of this county
          (Ray).
          > > Learning his whereabouts we struck camp on yesterday morning
          > > and made a forced march and came in contact with their pickets
          about
          > > a mile this side of Albany; drove them in and through Albany and
          into
          > > the woods beyond. We dismounted our men in the town, threw our
          > > infantry force into the woods beyond, sending a cavalry advance
          who
          > > engaged the enemy and fell back, when Anderson and his fiendish
          gang,
          > > about 300 strong, raised the Indian yell and came in full speed
          upon
          > > our lines, shooting and yelling as they came. Our lines held
          their
          > > position without a break.The notorious bushwhacker, Anderson, and
          one
          > > of his men, supposed to be Captain Rains, son of General Rains,
          > > charged through our lines. Anderson was killed and fell some
          fifty
          > > steps in our rear, receiving two balls in the side of the head.
          Rains
          > > made his escape and their forces retreated in full speed, being
          > > completely routed; our cavalry pursued them some ten miles,
          finding
          > > the road strewn with blood for miles. We hear of them scattered
          in
          > > various directions, some considerable force of them making thier
          way
          > > toward Richfield, in Clay County. We capured on Anderson private
          > > papers and orders from General Price that identify him beyond a
          > > doubt.
          > > I have the honor to report that my officers and me conducted
          > > themselves well and fought bravely on the field. We had 4 men
          > > wounded; lost none. The forces of my command consisted of a
          portion
          > > of Major Grimes, of Ray County, Fifty first Regiment Enrolled
          > > Missouri Militia, and a portion of the Thirty-Third Enrolled
          Missouri
          > > Militia, from Daviess and Caldwell Counties.
          > >
          > > Respectfully yours,
          > >
          > > S.P. COX
          > > Lieut. Col., Comdg. Thirty-third Regt. Enrolled Missouri
          > > Militia.
          > > GENERAL CRAIG
          > >
          > > (This one claims Anderson was hit with "two balls in the side of
          the
          > > head." Quite a feat of markmanship I would say.)
          > >
          > > ***
          > > The next is from a message by one of the members of our Bloody
          Bill
          > > Anderson Mystery group, Laura Anderson Way, in which she quotes
          Paul
          > > Petersen.
          > >
          > > "The following is from the book "Quantrill of Missouri" by Paul
          > > Petersen, page 392 and 393."
          > >
          > > "In late October, in Ray County, Anderson saw the report that
          Price
          > > had been defeated and that George Todd had been killed. On
          October 24
          > > he determined to punish the Federals for the Southern defeat at
          > > Westport."
          > >
          > > "Harrison Trow recalled that William Smith, a veteran guerrilla
          with
          > > four years' experience, rode next to Anderson. Trow claimed that
          five
          > > bullets struck Smith and three struck Anderson, and at the end of
          the
          > > fight, both men were dead."
          > >
          > > (Here Trow is quoted as saying "three (bullets) struck Anderson.
          > > Another strange fact is that, while this report claims William
          Smith
          > > was killed in this ambush, Smith's name appears nowhere on the
          > > monument erected to the guerrillas killed that day.)
          > >
          > > ***
          > > From: http://www.history.com/tdih.do?
          action=tdihArticleYear&id=2366
          > >
          > > "...Anderson went to Texas that winter, got married, and returned
          to
          > > Missouri in 1864 with a band of about 50 fighters. Anderson
          embarked
          > > on a summer of violence, leading his group on a campaign that
          killed
          > > hundreds and caused extensive damage. The climax came on
          September 27
          > > when Anderson's gang joined with several others to pillage the
          town
          > > of Centralia, Missouri. When more than 100 Union soldiers pursued
          > > them, the guerillas ambushed and massacred the entire detachment.
          > > Just a month later, Anderson's band was caught in a Union ambush
          > > outside of Albany, Missouri, and Anderson was killed by two
          bullets
          > > to his head. The body of the "blood-drenched savage," as he
          became
          > > known in the area, was placed on public display. Anderson kept a
          rope
          > > to record his killings, and there were 54 knots in it at the time
          of
          > > his death..."
          > >
          > > ***
          > >
          > > From:
          > > http://www.bullshido.net/modules. php?
          > > name=Reviews& file=viewarticle &id=291
          > >
          > > Adult language is used on that site.
          > >
          > > "...After completely decimating the town, he moved his men to the
          > > south of town and set up an ambush for 150 Union Calvary men
          moving
          > > in after him. They killed 116 of them. They shot them through the
          > > head, then scalped them and thrust them with bayonets. They even
          > > chopped of ears and noses.
          > >
          > > On October 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox
          and
          > > his Union troops. He and one other man charged the line guns
          blazing.
          > > His horse was shot and he bit the dust, he was then shot in the
          back
          > > of the head 2 times. His body was taken to Richmond, Missouri
          where
          > > they decapitated his corpse and stuck his head on a telegraph
          pole.
          > > His body was then dragged through the streets and dumped in an
          > > unmarked grave.
          > >
          > > Bloody Bill was passionate, angry and ruthless ~ described by Jim
          > > Cummins as "The most desperate man I ever met." "
          > >
          > > (This one seems to be saying Anderson's horse "bit the dust" and
          then
          > > Anderson was executed with two shots in the back of the head.)
          > >
          > > ***
          > >
          > > http://www.civilwarhistory.com/quantrill/anderson.htm
          > >
          > > "While leading his guerilla band near Orrick, Missouri on October
          > > 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox and his Union
          > > troops. Anderson was caught completely unaware and was riddled
          with
          > > bullets then left for dead in his saddle. His loyal followers put
          up
          > > a fight to try and recover Anderson's corpse, but they were
          driven
          > > back by superior firepower.
          > >
          > > Anderson's body was taken to Richmond, Missouri where it was
          propped
          > > up in a chair and a pistol was placed in the dead man's hand then
          > > photographs were taken. A short while later, the Union troopers,
          full
          > > of loathing for the dead man, decapitated Anderson and impaled
          his
          > > head on a telegraph pole at the entrance to the town as a
          signature
          > > to all that the infamous killer was indeed dead. Anderson's torso
          was
          > > roped and tied to a horse then dragged along the streets of
          Richmond
          > > before being dumped in an unmarked grave outside of town."
          > >
          > > (This is just one of many accounts that claim that Bill
          Anderson's
          > > body was "riddled with bullets".)
          > >
          > > ***
          > >
          > > Carl W. Breihan tells the story a little different in his account
          > > from page 78 of his "Killer Legions of Quantrill", 1971, by
          saying
          > > the following:
          > >
          > > "...Anderson was the first to fall, his body caught in a
          crossfire
          > > and riddled as he toppled from the saddle..."
          > >
          > > ***
          > >
          > > If it weren't for the seriousness of this historical event, all
          of
          > > these different and contradictory accounts would be laughable. To
          say
          > > the least, EVERY writer who has made money selling books
          containing a
          > > version of this ambush story owes the American public an
          explanation
          > > for writing whatever tale he/she chose to tell in the book(s),
          > > regarding the way they claim Bloody Bill Anderson was killed that
          > > day. They should step forward and give their sources for this
          > > misinformation.
          > > Thank you,
          > > ~Jay~
          > >
          >
        • Carl Williams
          Yeah, the Elvis thing has given these theories a bad name [g]. In all seriousness, I m reluctant to slam Jay s post too hard; I hope it didnt come off that
          Message 4 of 29 , Apr 28, 2007
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            Yeah, the Elvis thing has given these theories a bad name [g].

            In all seriousness, I'm reluctant to slam Jay's post too hard; I hope
            it didnt come off that way. Fresh from reading a book about some such
            subject can have you wondering. Curious autopsies, conflicting
            accounts, oddball coincidences etc. can get you going. [IIRC on all
            the next] I still can be swayed sometimes on the Dillenger thing. The
            FBI agent who got the glory, Purvis, was actually a big time screw-up
            who's subsequent actions cast plenty of doubt... the woman in red was
            treated horribly after her help, winding up getting deported.... I
            could go on.
            At the end of the day, I just check myself and "probably they got him
            but who knows"

            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Durney" <JWD2044@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > You forgot Elvis in your list of famous people, Elvis sightings are
            > right up there with UFOs. Shades of "Men in Black".
            >
            > LOL
          • James W. Durney
            The problem is that nothing is error free and everything can cause questions. If you were required to recount an event that occured 20 years ago, could you do
            Message 5 of 29 , Apr 28, 2007
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              The problem is that nothing is error free and everything can cause
              questions. If you were required to recount an event that occured 20
              years ago, could you do so and not add or leave out one thing? I don't
              think it is possible to do so.

              Now we have a question about your statement. If we get six or eight of
              them, those still alive, we have four or five questions, two
              contriductions and seventeen differences from the orginial statements.

              James
            • Jay Longley
              Hi Carl. Thank you for your intelligent discussion of other controversial death scenarios and for viewing my original message with an open mind. That is all
              Message 6 of 29 , Apr 28, 2007
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                Hi Carl. Thank you for your intelligent discussion of other
                controversial death scenarios and for viewing my original message
                with an open mind. That is all we are asking for because we believe
                that if enough people do what you are doing and look at all the facts
                and assumptions of both sides of the issue that history will be the
                benefactor.
                ~Jay~





                --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Jay, I would be the first to say "maybe you're right," so let me say
                > that and get it out of the way. Thanks, too, for taking the trouble
                to
                > post all this and I don't see why Bloody Bill wouldnt be a good
                topic
                > for us.
                >
                > I'd just say that anyone who would want to explore further whether
                > Anderson was killed as reported should consider:
                >
                > *it seems to be the case that it is appealing to believe that
                accepted
                > or official accounts may be wrong. Thus many famous people are
                doomed
                > to be accused of living longer than history would allow; Hitler,
                > Dillinger, Booth, even JFK. I think anyone has to ask himself
                whether
                > this appeal is just playing a large role.
                >
                > *aiding this perhaps natural inclination is the fact that official
                > accounts can have a lot of problems. This may be presented as
                unusual
                > but is actually the norm, IMO. Amazingly enough, any autopsy is as
                > likely to add to the confusion as to clear anything up. In the case
                of
                > JFK, Dillinger, and Booth [I believe] autopsies were botched to some
                > degree or other. Dillinger's eye color is reported incorrectly,
                > Booth's broken leg is incorrectly identified as on the wrong side [I
                > believe], and don't even get me started on JFK's autopsy. You'd
                think
                > the people doing autopsies would be competent. NO.
                >
                > *I've also noted that if you read a book presenting one view, you
                > forget you are reading a manipulated thing; you want to trust the
                > author. It is very helpful to read a book presenting the opposite
                > view, always eye-opening.
                >
                > *Lastly, one must factor the credibility of the claim the surviving
                > person and those hiding them could really be able to keep it all
                > secret, none defecting to expose the 'truth.'
                >
                > Check out civil war talk radio and booth. I havent listened to the
                > whole thing, but the author is able to question the account that
                > Booth's leg was broken at Ford's [that's as far as I got].
                > Below, a wikipedia thing on Booth.
                > Carl
                >
                >
                > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wilkes_Booth
                >
                > An early popularizer of "Booth Escaped" theories was Finis L. Bates
                > who claimed to have met Booth in Granbury, Texas in the 1870s and
                > later to have taken possession of Booth's body after his suicide in
                > Enid, Oklahoma in 1903. He toured the mummified body in carnival
                > sideshows and wrote The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth
                (1908)
                > in order to authenticate the mummy.
                >
                > Some believe that Booth escaped the tobacco barn at Garrett's farm,
                > with a look-alike double agent named James William Boyd dying in his
                > place, and the government going to great pains to cover up the
                > blunder. These theories are seen by most historians as having no
                > substance.
                >
                > The Lincoln Conspiracy (ISBN 1-56849-531-5) details the
                assassination,
                > the Boyd plot, and Booth's escape to the swamps. The Curse of Cain:
                > The Untold Story of John Wilkes Booth (ISBN 1-58006-021-8) continues
                > with the claim that Booth escaped, sought refuge in Japan and
                > eventually returned to the United States where he died in Enid,
                > Oklahoma in 1903. Another is that a man claiming to be Booth lived
                > into the 1900s in Missouri. In recent years, attempts to exhume the
                > grave where Booth is presumed buried in order to compare it with DNA
                > of living relatives have been blocked by Baltimore county judges,
                the
                > Maryland Court of Special Appeals, and members of the family,
                leaving
                > the question of escape open to theory.[7] FBI records made public
                give
                > no information to support the escape theory, however.[8]
                >
                > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the Bloody Bill
                > > Anderson story has been presented by historians and writers for
                over
                > > 140 years, has been the many contradictory accounts of both the
                > > number of gunshots and the location of gunshot wounds these
                writers
                > > claim killed Bloody Bill Anderson in the ambush near Orrick,
                Missouri
                > > on October 26th or 27th depending on which story you believe.
                Going
                > > back through my notes on this event, I came across over a dozen
                > > different and contradictory stories of both the number of
                gunshots
                > > this guerrilla was said to have taken and their location on the
                body.
                > > The contradictions are quite obvious and the differences are as
                > > numerous as the writers who told about these very important
                gunshots.
                > > If one accepts that Bloody Bill Anderson was killed in this
                ambush,
                > > which I don't, then it must be amply certain that only one of
                these
                > > reports can possibly be the true account. I will give you all
                just a
                > > sampling of these accounts and will leave it up to those who have
                > > written and published these opposing versions to explain their
                > > positions and give their sources.
                > > ****
                > >
                > > The following article was written, on October 8, 1989, by Lorene
                > > Bishop who was a writer for the Brownwood Bulletin and President
                of
                > > the Brown County Historical Society. Lorene Bishop, as almost
                every
                > > reputable Brown County historian believed firmly that Bloody Bill
                > > Anderson lived out his life in Brown County, Texas until his
                death in
                > > 1927. I am posting only the portion of Bishop's book that deals
                with
                > > the ambush below as told by James S. Hackley:
                > >
                > > "... The existence of the Bill Anderson of Texas that became
                known to
                > > Missourians in 1924 when a short article about him appeared in
                The
                > > Houston Post and was copied in Missouri papers. At once Colonel
                > > James S. Hackley, an early settler of Mobeby Missouri present his
                > > knowledge of the facts preceeding the slaying. His story
                indicates
                > > that the guerrilla's body was identified by his, Hackley's
                mother, a
                > > cousin of the slain Confederate irregular...
                > > Four weeks later we drove to Richmond to my mother's brother.
                When
                > > my uncle came out to greet my mother, a boy ran up and said that
                Bill
                > > Anderson had been killed and his body was at Tice's gallery.
                > > We went to Tice's gallery. When my mother saw the blood on
                > > Anderson's face, and his clotted hair, she pleaded that the
                picture
                > > not be taken until she had washed his face and combed his hair.
                Her
                > > plea was refused by Captain Cox, who was present and claimed to
                have
                > > killed Anderson.
                > > Anderson was buried in Richmond. The bullet that ended his life
                > > struck him in the back of his head and came out through his
                > > forehead.' "
                > >
                > > (This account says ONE bullet "struck him in the back of the head
                and
                > > came out through his forehead.")
                > > ***
                > >
                > > This next account is from the War of the Rebellion Records and
                comes
                > > from no other that Lt. Colonel S.P. Cox himself.
                > >
                > > "Report of Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Cox, Thirty-third Infanty
                Enrolled
                > > Missouri Militia.
                > > Richmond, Mo., October 27, 1864.
                > >
                > > DEAR SIR: We have the honor to report the result of our
                expedition on
                > > yesterday against the notorious bushwhacker, William T. Anderson
                and
                > > his forces, near Albany, in the soutwest corner of this county
                (Ray).
                > > Learning his whereabouts we struck camp on yesterday morning
                > > and made a forced march and came in contact with their pickets
                about
                > > a mile this side of Albany; drove them in and through Albany and
                into
                > > the woods beyond. We dismounted our men in the town, threw our
                > > infantry force into the woods beyond, sending a cavalry advance
                who
                > > engaged the enemy and fell back, when Anderson and his fiendish
                gang,
                > > about 300 strong, raised the Indian yell and came in full speed
                upon
                > > our lines, shooting and yelling as they came. Our lines held
                their
                > > position without a break.The notorious bushwhacker, Anderson, and
                one
                > > of his men, supposed to be Captain Rains, son of General Rains,
                > > charged through our lines. Anderson was killed and fell some
                fifty
                > > steps in our rear, receiving two balls in the side of the head.
                Rains
                > > made his escape and their forces retreated in full speed, being
                > > completely routed; our cavalry pursued them some ten miles,
                finding
                > > the road strewn with blood for miles. We hear of them scattered
                in
                > > various directions, some considerable force of them making thier
                way
                > > toward Richfield, in Clay County. We capured on Anderson private
                > > papers and orders from General Price that identify him beyond a
                > > doubt.
                > > I have the honor to report that my officers and me conducted
                > > themselves well and fought bravely on the field. We had 4 men
                > > wounded; lost none. The forces of my command consisted of a
                portion
                > > of Major Grimes, of Ray County, Fifty first Regiment Enrolled
                > > Missouri Militia, and a portion of the Thirty-Third Enrolled
                Missouri
                > > Militia, from Daviess and Caldwell Counties.
                > >
                > > Respectfully yours,
                > >
                > > S.P. COX
                > > Lieut. Col., Comdg. Thirty-third Regt. Enrolled Missouri
                > > Militia.
                > > GENERAL CRAIG
                > >
                > > (This one claims Anderson was hit with "two balls in the side of
                the
                > > head." Quite a feat of markmanship I would say.)
                > >
                > > ***
                > > The next is from a message by one of the members of our Bloody
                Bill
                > > Anderson Mystery group, Laura Anderson Way, in which she quotes
                Paul
                > > Petersen.
                > >
                > > "The following is from the book "Quantrill of Missouri" by Paul
                > > Petersen, page 392 and 393."
                > >
                > > "In late October, in Ray County, Anderson saw the report that
                Price
                > > had been defeated and that George Todd had been killed. On
                October 24
                > > he determined to punish the Federals for the Southern defeat at
                > > Westport."
                > >
                > > "Harrison Trow recalled that William Smith, a veteran guerrilla
                with
                > > four years' experience, rode next to Anderson. Trow claimed that
                five
                > > bullets struck Smith and three struck Anderson, and at the end of
                the
                > > fight, both men were dead."
                > >
                > > (Here Trow is quoted as saying "three (bullets) struck Anderson.
                > > Another strange fact is that, while this report claims William
                Smith
                > > was killed in this ambush, Smith's name appears nowhere on the
                > > monument erected to the guerrillas killed that day.)
                > >
                > > ***
                > > From: http://www.history.com/tdih.do?
                action=tdihArticleYear&id=2366
                > >
                > > "...Anderson went to Texas that winter, got married, and returned
                to
                > > Missouri in 1864 with a band of about 50 fighters. Anderson
                embarked
                > > on a summer of violence, leading his group on a campaign that
                killed
                > > hundreds and caused extensive damage. The climax came on
                September 27
                > > when Anderson's gang joined with several others to pillage the
                town
                > > of Centralia, Missouri. When more than 100 Union soldiers pursued
                > > them, the guerillas ambushed and massacred the entire detachment.
                > > Just a month later, Anderson's band was caught in a Union ambush
                > > outside of Albany, Missouri, and Anderson was killed by two
                bullets
                > > to his head. The body of the "blood-drenched savage," as he
                became
                > > known in the area, was placed on public display. Anderson kept a
                rope
                > > to record his killings, and there were 54 knots in it at the time
                of
                > > his death..."
                > >
                > > ***
                > >
                > > From:
                > > http://www.bullshido.net/modules. php?
                > > name=Reviews& file=viewarticle &id=291
                > >
                > > Adult language is used on that site.
                > >
                > > "...After completely decimating the town, he moved his men to the
                > > south of town and set up an ambush for 150 Union Calvary men
                moving
                > > in after him. They killed 116 of them. They shot them through the
                > > head, then scalped them and thrust them with bayonets. They even
                > > chopped of ears and noses.
                > >
                > > On October 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox
                and
                > > his Union troops. He and one other man charged the line guns
                blazing.
                > > His horse was shot and he bit the dust, he was then shot in the
                back
                > > of the head 2 times. His body was taken to Richmond, Missouri
                where
                > > they decapitated his corpse and stuck his head on a telegraph
                pole.
                > > His body was then dragged through the streets and dumped in an
                > > unmarked grave.
                > >
                > > Bloody Bill was passionate, angry and ruthless ~ described by Jim
                > > Cummins as "The most desperate man I ever met." "
                > >
                > > (This one seems to be saying Anderson's horse "bit the dust" and
                then
                > > Anderson was executed with two shots in the back of the head.)
                > >
                > > ***
                > >
                > > http://www.civilwarhistory.com/quantrill/anderson.htm
                > >
                > > "While leading his guerilla band near Orrick, Missouri on October
                > > 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox and his Union
                > > troops. Anderson was caught completely unaware and was riddled
                with
                > > bullets then left for dead in his saddle. His loyal followers put
                up
                > > a fight to try and recover Anderson's corpse, but they were
                driven
                > > back by superior firepower.
                > >
                > > Anderson's body was taken to Richmond, Missouri where it was
                propped
                > > up in a chair and a pistol was placed in the dead man's hand then
                > > photographs were taken. A short while later, the Union troopers,
                full
                > > of loathing for the dead man, decapitated Anderson and impaled
                his
                > > head on a telegraph pole at the entrance to the town as a
                signature
                > > to all that the infamous killer was indeed dead. Anderson's torso
                was
                > > roped and tied to a horse then dragged along the streets of
                Richmond
                > > before being dumped in an unmarked grave outside of town."
                > >
                > > (This is just one of many accounts that claim that Bill
                Anderson's
                > > body was "riddled with bullets".)
                > >
                > > ***
                > >
                > > Carl W. Breihan tells the story a little different in his account
                > > from page 78 of his "Killer Legions of Quantrill", 1971, by
                saying
                > > the following:
                > >
                > > "...Anderson was the first to fall, his body caught in a
                crossfire
                > > and riddled as he toppled from the saddle..."
                > >
                > > ***
                > >
                > > If it weren't for the seriousness of this historical event, all
                of
                > > these different and contradictory accounts would be laughable. To
                say
                > > the least, EVERY writer who has made money selling books
                containing a
                > > version of this ambush story owes the American public an
                explanation
                > > for writing whatever tale he/she chose to tell in the book(s),
                > > regarding the way they claim Bloody Bill Anderson was killed that
                > > day. They should step forward and give their sources for this
                > > misinformation.
                > > Thank you,
                > > ~Jay~
                > >
                >
              • Jay Longley
                Hi James. The obvious problem the traditionalist historians/writers have in the Bloody Bill Anderson case is different from the many others because here you
                Message 7 of 29 , Apr 28, 2007
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                  Hi James. The obvious problem the traditionalist historians/writers
                  have in the Bloody Bill Anderson case is different from the many others
                  because here you have people, pretending to know what killed a man, who
                  really don't have a clue. The shooting could have happened in only one
                  way just as you were born on only one day, one hour, one minute or one
                  second. "Historians" can give you all the birthdays they want to pin
                  on you but they are all false except the one specific time you were
                  born.
                  Saying this, it is humorous to me to read all of different so-
                  called "expert accounts" of what happened that day. Not one of them
                  ever challenges the other. Yet they all come together in absolute
                  certainty that the dead man was properly identified as Bloody Bill
                  Anderson. It defies logic to put it mildly.
                  Thank you,
                  ~Jay~



                  --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Durney" <JWD2044@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > The problem is that nothing is error free and everything can cause
                  > questions. If you were required to recount an event that occured 20
                  > years ago, could you do so and not add or leave out one thing? I
                  don't
                  > think it is possible to do so.
                  >
                  > Now we have a question about your statement. If we get six or eight
                  of
                  > them, those still alive, we have four or five questions, two
                  > contriductions and seventeen differences from the orginial statements.
                  >
                  > James
                  >
                • Jay Longley
                  My apologies for using the wrong noun. I should have said history will be the beneficiary and not benefactor . ~Jay~ ... believe ... facts ... say ...
                  Message 8 of 29 , Apr 28, 2007
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                    My apologies for using the wrong noun. I should have said "history
                    will be the beneficiary" and not "benefactor".
                    ~Jay~



                    --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Carl. Thank you for your intelligent discussion of other
                    > controversial death scenarios and for viewing my original message
                    > with an open mind. That is all we are asking for because we
                    believe
                    > that if enough people do what you are doing and look at all the
                    facts
                    > and assumptions of both sides of the issue that history will be the
                    > benefactor.
                    > ~Jay~
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Jay, I would be the first to say "maybe you're right," so let me
                    say
                    > > that and get it out of the way. Thanks, too, for taking the
                    trouble
                    > to
                    > > post all this and I don't see why Bloody Bill wouldnt be a good
                    > topic
                    > > for us.
                    > >
                    > > I'd just say that anyone who would want to explore further whether
                    > > Anderson was killed as reported should consider:
                    > >
                    > > *it seems to be the case that it is appealing to believe that
                    > accepted
                    > > or official accounts may be wrong. Thus many famous people are
                    > doomed
                    > > to be accused of living longer than history would allow; Hitler,
                    > > Dillinger, Booth, even JFK. I think anyone has to ask himself
                    > whether
                    > > this appeal is just playing a large role.
                    > >
                    > > *aiding this perhaps natural inclination is the fact that official
                    > > accounts can have a lot of problems. This may be presented as
                    > unusual
                    > > but is actually the norm, IMO. Amazingly enough, any autopsy is as
                    > > likely to add to the confusion as to clear anything up. In the
                    case
                    > of
                    > > JFK, Dillinger, and Booth [I believe] autopsies were botched to
                    some
                    > > degree or other. Dillinger's eye color is reported incorrectly,
                    > > Booth's broken leg is incorrectly identified as on the wrong side
                    [I
                    > > believe], and don't even get me started on JFK's autopsy. You'd
                    > think
                    > > the people doing autopsies would be competent. NO.
                    > >
                    > > *I've also noted that if you read a book presenting one view, you
                    > > forget you are reading a manipulated thing; you want to trust the
                    > > author. It is very helpful to read a book presenting the opposite
                    > > view, always eye-opening.
                    > >
                    > > *Lastly, one must factor the credibility of the claim the
                    surviving
                    > > person and those hiding them could really be able to keep it all
                    > > secret, none defecting to expose the 'truth.'
                    > >
                    > > Check out civil war talk radio and booth. I havent listened to the
                    > > whole thing, but the author is able to question the account that
                    > > Booth's leg was broken at Ford's [that's as far as I got].
                    > > Below, a wikipedia thing on Booth.
                    > > Carl
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wilkes_Booth
                    > >
                    > > An early popularizer of "Booth Escaped" theories was Finis L.
                    Bates
                    > > who claimed to have met Booth in Granbury, Texas in the 1870s and
                    > > later to have taken possession of Booth's body after his suicide
                    in
                    > > Enid, Oklahoma in 1903. He toured the mummified body in carnival
                    > > sideshows and wrote The Escape and Suicide of John Wilkes Booth
                    > (1908)
                    > > in order to authenticate the mummy.
                    > >
                    > > Some believe that Booth escaped the tobacco barn at Garrett's
                    farm,
                    > > with a look-alike double agent named James William Boyd dying in
                    his
                    > > place, and the government going to great pains to cover up the
                    > > blunder. These theories are seen by most historians as having no
                    > > substance.
                    > >
                    > > The Lincoln Conspiracy (ISBN 1-56849-531-5) details the
                    > assassination,
                    > > the Boyd plot, and Booth's escape to the swamps. The Curse of
                    Cain:
                    > > The Untold Story of John Wilkes Booth (ISBN 1-58006-021-8)
                    continues
                    > > with the claim that Booth escaped, sought refuge in Japan and
                    > > eventually returned to the United States where he died in Enid,
                    > > Oklahoma in 1903. Another is that a man claiming to be Booth lived
                    > > into the 1900s in Missouri. In recent years, attempts to exhume
                    the
                    > > grave where Booth is presumed buried in order to compare it with
                    DNA
                    > > of living relatives have been blocked by Baltimore county judges,
                    > the
                    > > Maryland Court of Special Appeals, and members of the family,
                    > leaving
                    > > the question of escape open to theory.[7] FBI records made public
                    > give
                    > > no information to support the escape theory, however.[8]
                    > >
                    > > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the Bloody
                    Bill
                    > > > Anderson story has been presented by historians and writers for
                    > over
                    > > > 140 years, has been the many contradictory accounts of both the
                    > > > number of gunshots and the location of gunshot wounds these
                    > writers
                    > > > claim killed Bloody Bill Anderson in the ambush near Orrick,
                    > Missouri
                    > > > on October 26th or 27th depending on which story you believe.
                    > Going
                    > > > back through my notes on this event, I came across over a dozen
                    > > > different and contradictory stories of both the number of
                    > gunshots
                    > > > this guerrilla was said to have taken and their location on the
                    > body.
                    > > > The contradictions are quite obvious and the differences are as
                    > > > numerous as the writers who told about these very important
                    > gunshots.
                    > > > If one accepts that Bloody Bill Anderson was killed in this
                    > ambush,
                    > > > which I don't, then it must be amply certain that only one of
                    > these
                    > > > reports can possibly be the true account. I will give you all
                    > just a
                    > > > sampling of these accounts and will leave it up to those who
                    have
                    > > > written and published these opposing versions to explain their
                    > > > positions and give their sources.
                    > > > ****
                    > > >
                    > > > The following article was written, on October 8, 1989, by
                    Lorene
                    > > > Bishop who was a writer for the Brownwood Bulletin and
                    President
                    > of
                    > > > the Brown County Historical Society. Lorene Bishop, as almost
                    > every
                    > > > reputable Brown County historian believed firmly that Bloody
                    Bill
                    > > > Anderson lived out his life in Brown County, Texas until his
                    > death in
                    > > > 1927. I am posting only the portion of Bishop's book that deals
                    > with
                    > > > the ambush below as told by James S. Hackley:
                    > > >
                    > > > "... The existence of the Bill Anderson of Texas that became
                    > known to
                    > > > Missourians in 1924 when a short article about him appeared in
                    > The
                    > > > Houston Post and was copied in Missouri papers. At once Colonel
                    > > > James S. Hackley, an early settler of Mobeby Missouri present
                    his
                    > > > knowledge of the facts preceeding the slaying. His story
                    > indicates
                    > > > that the guerrilla's body was identified by his, Hackley's
                    > mother, a
                    > > > cousin of the slain Confederate irregular...
                    > > > Four weeks later we drove to Richmond to my mother's brother.
                    > When
                    > > > my uncle came out to greet my mother, a boy ran up and said
                    that
                    > Bill
                    > > > Anderson had been killed and his body was at Tice's gallery.
                    > > > We went to Tice's gallery. When my mother saw the blood on
                    > > > Anderson's face, and his clotted hair, she pleaded that the
                    > picture
                    > > > not be taken until she had washed his face and combed his hair.
                    > Her
                    > > > plea was refused by Captain Cox, who was present and claimed to
                    > have
                    > > > killed Anderson.
                    > > > Anderson was buried in Richmond. The bullet that ended his life
                    > > > struck him in the back of his head and came out through his
                    > > > forehead.' "
                    > > >
                    > > > (This account says ONE bullet "struck him in the back of the
                    head
                    > and
                    > > > came out through his forehead.")
                    > > > ***
                    > > >
                    > > > This next account is from the War of the Rebellion Records and
                    > comes
                    > > > from no other that Lt. Colonel S.P. Cox himself.
                    > > >
                    > > > "Report of Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Cox, Thirty-third Infanty
                    > Enrolled
                    > > > Missouri Militia.
                    > > > Richmond, Mo., October 27, 1864.
                    > > >
                    > > > DEAR SIR: We have the honor to report the result of our
                    > expedition on
                    > > > yesterday against the notorious bushwhacker, William T.
                    Anderson
                    > and
                    > > > his forces, near Albany, in the soutwest corner of this county
                    > (Ray).
                    > > > Learning his whereabouts we struck camp on yesterday morning
                    > > > and made a forced march and came in contact with their pickets
                    > about
                    > > > a mile this side of Albany; drove them in and through Albany
                    and
                    > into
                    > > > the woods beyond. We dismounted our men in the town, threw our
                    > > > infantry force into the woods beyond, sending a cavalry advance
                    > who
                    > > > engaged the enemy and fell back, when Anderson and his fiendish
                    > gang,
                    > > > about 300 strong, raised the Indian yell and came in full speed
                    > upon
                    > > > our lines, shooting and yelling as they came. Our lines held
                    > their
                    > > > position without a break.The notorious bushwhacker, Anderson,
                    and
                    > one
                    > > > of his men, supposed to be Captain Rains, son of General Rains,
                    > > > charged through our lines. Anderson was killed and fell some
                    > fifty
                    > > > steps in our rear, receiving two balls in the side of the head.
                    > Rains
                    > > > made his escape and their forces retreated in full speed, being
                    > > > completely routed; our cavalry pursued them some ten miles,
                    > finding
                    > > > the road strewn with blood for miles. We hear of them scattered
                    > in
                    > > > various directions, some considerable force of them making
                    thier
                    > way
                    > > > toward Richfield, in Clay County. We capured on Anderson
                    private
                    > > > papers and orders from General Price that identify him beyond a
                    > > > doubt.
                    > > > I have the honor to report that my officers and me conducted
                    > > > themselves well and fought bravely on the field. We had 4 men
                    > > > wounded; lost none. The forces of my command consisted of a
                    > portion
                    > > > of Major Grimes, of Ray County, Fifty first Regiment Enrolled
                    > > > Missouri Militia, and a portion of the Thirty-Third Enrolled
                    > Missouri
                    > > > Militia, from Daviess and Caldwell Counties.
                    > > >
                    > > > Respectfully yours,
                    > > >
                    > > > S.P. COX
                    > > > Lieut. Col., Comdg. Thirty-third Regt. Enrolled Missouri
                    > > > Militia.
                    > > > GENERAL CRAIG
                    > > >
                    > > > (This one claims Anderson was hit with "two balls in the side
                    of
                    > the
                    > > > head." Quite a feat of markmanship I would say.)
                    > > >
                    > > > ***
                    > > > The next is from a message by one of the members of our Bloody
                    > Bill
                    > > > Anderson Mystery group, Laura Anderson Way, in which she quotes
                    > Paul
                    > > > Petersen.
                    > > >
                    > > > "The following is from the book "Quantrill of Missouri" by Paul
                    > > > Petersen, page 392 and 393."
                    > > >
                    > > > "In late October, in Ray County, Anderson saw the report that
                    > Price
                    > > > had been defeated and that George Todd had been killed. On
                    > October 24
                    > > > he determined to punish the Federals for the Southern defeat at
                    > > > Westport."
                    > > >
                    > > > "Harrison Trow recalled that William Smith, a veteran guerrilla
                    > with
                    > > > four years' experience, rode next to Anderson. Trow claimed
                    that
                    > five
                    > > > bullets struck Smith and three struck Anderson, and at the end
                    of
                    > the
                    > > > fight, both men were dead."
                    > > >
                    > > > (Here Trow is quoted as saying "three (bullets) struck
                    Anderson.
                    > > > Another strange fact is that, while this report claims William
                    > Smith
                    > > > was killed in this ambush, Smith's name appears nowhere on the
                    > > > monument erected to the guerrillas killed that day.)
                    > > >
                    > > > ***
                    > > > From: http://www.history.com/tdih.do?
                    > action=tdihArticleYear&id=2366
                    > > >
                    > > > "...Anderson went to Texas that winter, got married, and
                    returned
                    > to
                    > > > Missouri in 1864 with a band of about 50 fighters. Anderson
                    > embarked
                    > > > on a summer of violence, leading his group on a campaign that
                    > killed
                    > > > hundreds and caused extensive damage. The climax came on
                    > September 27
                    > > > when Anderson's gang joined with several others to pillage the
                    > town
                    > > > of Centralia, Missouri. When more than 100 Union soldiers
                    pursued
                    > > > them, the guerillas ambushed and massacred the entire
                    detachment.
                    > > > Just a month later, Anderson's band was caught in a Union
                    ambush
                    > > > outside of Albany, Missouri, and Anderson was killed by two
                    > bullets
                    > > > to his head. The body of the "blood-drenched savage," as he
                    > became
                    > > > known in the area, was placed on public display. Anderson kept
                    a
                    > rope
                    > > > to record his killings, and there were 54 knots in it at the
                    time
                    > of
                    > > > his death..."
                    > > >
                    > > > ***
                    > > >
                    > > > From:
                    > > > http://www.bullshido.net/modules. php?
                    > > > name=Reviews& file=viewarticle &id=291
                    > > >
                    > > > Adult language is used on that site.
                    > > >
                    > > > "...After completely decimating the town, he moved his men to
                    the
                    > > > south of town and set up an ambush for 150 Union Calvary men
                    > moving
                    > > > in after him. They killed 116 of them. They shot them through
                    the
                    > > > head, then scalped them and thrust them with bayonets. They
                    even
                    > > > chopped of ears and noses.
                    > > >
                    > > > On October 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox
                    > and
                    > > > his Union troops. He and one other man charged the line guns
                    > blazing.
                    > > > His horse was shot and he bit the dust, he was then shot in the
                    > back
                    > > > of the head 2 times. His body was taken to Richmond, Missouri
                    > where
                    > > > they decapitated his corpse and stuck his head on a telegraph
                    > pole.
                    > > > His body was then dragged through the streets and dumped in an
                    > > > unmarked grave.
                    > > >
                    > > > Bloody Bill was passionate, angry and ruthless ~ described by
                    Jim
                    > > > Cummins as "The most desperate man I ever met." "
                    > > >
                    > > > (This one seems to be saying Anderson's horse "bit the dust"
                    and
                    > then
                    > > > Anderson was executed with two shots in the back of the head.)
                    > > >
                    > > > ***
                    > > >
                    > > > http://www.civilwarhistory.com/quantrill/anderson.htm
                    > > >
                    > > > "While leading his guerilla band near Orrick, Missouri on
                    October
                    > > > 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox and his
                    Union
                    > > > troops. Anderson was caught completely unaware and was riddled
                    > with
                    > > > bullets then left for dead in his saddle. His loyal followers
                    put
                    > up
                    > > > a fight to try and recover Anderson's corpse, but they were
                    > driven
                    > > > back by superior firepower.
                    > > >
                    > > > Anderson's body was taken to Richmond, Missouri where it was
                    > propped
                    > > > up in a chair and a pistol was placed in the dead man's hand
                    then
                    > > > photographs were taken. A short while later, the Union
                    troopers,
                    > full
                    > > > of loathing for the dead man, decapitated Anderson and impaled
                    > his
                    > > > head on a telegraph pole at the entrance to the town as a
                    > signature
                    > > > to all that the infamous killer was indeed dead. Anderson's
                    torso
                    > was
                    > > > roped and tied to a horse then dragged along the streets of
                    > Richmond
                    > > > before being dumped in an unmarked grave outside of town."
                    > > >
                    > > > (This is just one of many accounts that claim that Bill
                    > Anderson's
                    > > > body was "riddled with bullets".)
                    > > >
                    > > > ***
                    > > >
                    > > > Carl W. Breihan tells the story a little different in his
                    account
                    > > > from page 78 of his "Killer Legions of Quantrill", 1971, by
                    > saying
                    > > > the following:
                    > > >
                    > > > "...Anderson was the first to fall, his body caught in a
                    > crossfire
                    > > > and riddled as he toppled from the saddle..."
                    > > >
                    > > > ***
                    > > >
                    > > > If it weren't for the seriousness of this historical event, all
                    > of
                    > > > these different and contradictory accounts would be laughable.
                    To
                    > say
                    > > > the least, EVERY writer who has made money selling books
                    > containing a
                    > > > version of this ambush story owes the American public an
                    > explanation
                    > > > for writing whatever tale he/she chose to tell in the book(s),
                    > > > regarding the way they claim Bloody Bill Anderson was killed
                    that
                    > > > day. They should step forward and give their sources for this
                    > > > misinformation.
                    > > > Thank you,
                    > > > ~Jay~
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Tom Mix
                    Jay, Thanks for the fascinating accounts. Is there one that you agree with? If so why? If not, why not? I don t know as much about Anderson and Missouri as I
                    Message 9 of 29 , Apr 28, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment

                      Jay,

                      Thanks for the fascinating accounts. Is there one that you agree with? If so why? If not, why not?

                      I don’t know as much about Anderson and Missouri as I do other areas of the war. I found your information very interesting and informative.

                      Tom

                       

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com [mailto:civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jay Longley
                      Sent: Friday, April 27, 2007 6:48 PM
                      To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [civilwarwest] Gunshots they claim killed Bill Anderson.

                       

                      One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the Bloody Bill
                      Anderson story has been presented by historians and writers for over
                      140 years, has been the many contradictory accounts of both the
                      number of gunshots and the location of gunshot wounds these writers
                      claim killed Bloody Bill Anderson in the ambush near Orrick, Missouri
                      on October 26th or 27th depending on which story you believe. Going
                      back through my notes on this event, I came across over a dozen
                      different and contradictory stories of both the number of gunshots
                      this guerrilla was said to have taken and their location on the body.
                      The contradictions are quite obvious and the differences are as
                      numerous as the writers who told about these very important gunshots.
                      If one accepts that Bloody Bill Anderson was killed in this ambush,
                      which I don't, then it must be amply certain that only one of these
                      reports can possibly be the true account. I will give you all just a
                      sampling of these accounts and will leave it up to those who have
                      written and published these opposing versions to explain their
                      positions and give their sources.
                      ****

                      The following article was written, on October 8, 1989, by Lorene
                      Bishop who was a writer for the Brownwood Bulletin and President of
                      the Brown County Historical Society. Lorene Bishop, as almost every
                      reputable Brown County historian believed firmly that Bloody Bill
                      Anderson lived out his life in Brown County, Texas until his death in
                      1927. I am posting only the portion of Bishop's book that deals with
                      the ambush below as told by James S. Hackley:

                      "... The existence of the Bill Anderson of Texas that became known to
                      Missourians in 1924 when a short article about him appeared in The
                      Houston Post and was copied in Missouri papers. At once Colonel
                      James S. Hackley, an early settler of Mobeby Missouri present his
                      knowledge of the facts preceeding the slaying. His story indicates
                      that the guerrilla's body was identified by his, Hackley's mother, a
                      cousin of the slain Confederate irregular...
                      Four weeks later we drove to Richmond to my mother's brother. When
                      my uncle came out to greet my mother, a boy ran up and said that Bill
                      Anderson had been killed and his body was at Tice's gallery.
                      We went to Tice's gallery. When my mother saw the blood on
                      Anderson's face, and his clotted hair, she pleaded that the picture
                      not be taken until she had washed his face and combed his hair. Her
                      plea was refused by Captain Cox, who was present and claimed to have
                      killed Anderson.
                      Anderson was buried in Richmond. The bullet that ended his life
                      struck him in the back of his head and came out through his
                      forehead.' "

                      (This account says ONE bullet "struck him in the back of the head and
                      came out through his forehead.")
                      ***

                      This next account is from the War of the Rebellion Records and comes
                      from no other that Lt. Colonel S.P. Cox himself.

                      "Report of Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Cox, Thirty-third Infanty Enrolled
                      Missouri Militia.
                      Richmond, Mo., October 27, 1864.

                      DEAR SIR: We have the honor to report the result of our expedition on
                      yesterday against the notorious bushwhacker, William T. Anderson and
                      his forces, near Albany, in the soutwest corner of this county (Ray).
                      Learning his whereabouts we struck camp on yesterday morning
                      and made a forced march and came in contact with their pickets about
                      a mile this side of Albany; drove them in and through Albany and into
                      the woods beyond. We dismounted our men in the town, threw our
                      infantry force into the woods beyond, sending a cavalry advance who
                      engaged the enemy and fell back, when Anderson and his fiendish gang,
                      about 300 strong, raised the Indian yell and came in full speed upon
                      our lines, shooting and yelling as they came. Our lines held their
                      position without a break.The notorious bushwhacker, Anderson, and one
                      of his men, supposed to be Captain Rains, son of General Rains,
                      charged through our lines. Anderson was killed and fell some fifty
                      steps in our rear, receiving two balls in the side of the head. Rains
                      made his escape and their forces retreated in full speed, being
                      completely routed; our cavalry pursued them some ten miles, finding
                      the road strewn with blood for miles. We hear of them scattered in
                      various directions, some considerable force of them making thier way
                      toward Richfield, in Clay County. We capured on Anderson private
                      papers and orders from General Price that identify him beyond a
                      doubt.
                      I have the honor to report that my officers and me conducted
                      themselves well and fought bravely on the field. We had 4 men
                      wounded; lost none. The forces of my command consisted of a portion
                      of Major Grimes, of Ray County, Fifty first Regiment Enrolled
                      Missouri Militia, and a portion of the Thirty-Third Enrolled Missouri
                      Militia, from Daviess and Caldwell Counties.

                      Respectfully yours,

                      S.P. COX
                      Lieut. Col., Comdg. Thirty-third Regt. Enrolled Missouri
                      Militia.
                      GENERAL CRAIG

                      (This one claims Anderson was hit with "two balls in the side of the
                      head." Quite a feat of markmanship I would say.)

                      ***
                      The next is from a message by one of the members of our Bloody Bill
                      Anderson Mystery group, Laura Anderson Way, in which she quotes Paul
                      Petersen.

                      "The following is from the book "Quantrill of Missouri" by Paul
                      Petersen, page 392 and 393."

                      "In late October, in Ray County, Anderson saw the report that Price
                      had been defeated and that George Todd had been killed. On October 24
                      he determined to punish the Federals for the Southern defeat at
                      Westport."

                      "Harrison Trow recalled that William Smith, a veteran guerrilla with
                      four years' experience, rode next to Anderson. Trow claimed that five
                      bullets struck Smith and three struck Anderson, and at the end of the
                      fight, both men were dead."

                      (Here Trow is quoted as saying "three (bullets) struck Anderson.
                      Another strange fact is that, while this report claims William Smith
                      was killed in this ambush, Smith's name appears nowhere on the
                      monument erected to the guerrillas killed that day.)

                      ***
                      From: http://www.history. com/tdih. do?action= tdihArticleYear& id=2366

                      "...Anderson went to Texas that winter, got married, and returned to
                      Missouri in 1864 with a band of about 50 fighters. Anderson embarked
                      on a summer of violence, leading his group on a campaign that killed
                      hundreds and caused extensive damage. The climax came on September 27
                      when Anderson's gang joined with several others to pillage the town
                      of Centralia, Missouri. When more than 100 Union soldiers pursued
                      them, the guerillas ambushed and massacred the entire detachment.
                      Just a month later, Anderson's band was caught in a Union ambush
                      outside of Albany, Missouri, and Anderson was killed by two bullets
                      to his head. The body of the "blood-drenched savage," as he became
                      known in the area, was placed on public display. Anderson kept a rope
                      to record his killings, and there were 54 knots in it at the time of
                      his death..."

                      ***

                      From:
                      http://www.bullshid o.net/modules. php?
                      name=Reviews& file=viewarticle &id=291

                      Adult language is used on that site.

                      "...After completely decimating the town, he moved his men to the
                      south of town and set up an ambush for 150 Union Calvary men moving
                      in after him. They killed 116 of them. They shot them through the
                      head, then scalped them and thrust them with bayonets. They even
                      chopped of ears and noses.

                      On October 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox and
                      his Union troops. He and one other man charged the line guns blazing.
                      His horse was shot and he bit the dust, he was then shot in the back
                      of the head 2 times. His body was taken to Richmond, Missouri where
                      they decapitated his corpse and stuck his head on a telegraph pole.
                      His body was then dragged through the streets and dumped in an
                      unmarked grave.

                      Bloody Bill was passionate, angry and ruthless ~ described by Jim
                      Cummins as "The most desperate man I ever met." "

                      (This one seems to be saying Anderson's horse "bit the dust" and then
                      Anderson was executed with two shots in the back of the head.)

                      ***

                      http://www.civilwar history.com/ quantrill/ anderson. htm

                      "While leading his guerilla band near Orrick, Missouri on October
                      27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox and his Union
                      troops. Anderson was caught completely unaware and was riddled with
                      bullets then left for dead in his saddle. His loyal followers put up
                      a fight to try and recover Anderson's corpse, but they were driven
                      back by superior firepower.

                      Anderson's body was taken to Richmond, Missouri where it was propped
                      up in a chair and a pistol was placed in the dead man's hand then
                      photographs were taken. A short while later, the Union troopers, full
                      of loathing for the dead man, decapitated Anderson and impaled his
                      head on a telegraph pole at the entrance to the town as a signature
                      to all that the infamous killer was indeed dead. Anderson's torso was
                      roped and tied to a horse then dragged along the streets of Richmond
                      before being dumped in an unmarked grave outside of town."

                      (This is just one of many accounts that claim that Bill Anderson's
                      body was "riddled with bullets".)

                      ***

                      Carl W. Breihan tells the story a little different in his account
                      from page 78 of his "Killer Legions of Quantrill", 1971, by saying
                      the following:

                      "...Anderson was the first to fall, his body caught in a crossfire
                      and riddled as he toppled from the saddle..."

                      ***

                      If it weren't for the seriousness of this historical event, all of
                      these different and contradictory accounts would be laughable. To say
                      the least, EVERY writer who has made money selling books containing a
                      version of this ambush story owes the American public an explanation
                      for writing whatever tale he/she chose to tell in the book(s),
                      regarding the way they claim Bloody Bill Anderson was killed that
                      day. They should step forward and give their sources for this
                      misinformation.
                      Thank you,
                      ~Jay~

                    • James W. Durney
                      ... Jay, I don t think they have a problem . However, you seem to have a problem with them. I m not saying history is always correct or even has the facts
                      Message 10 of 29 , Apr 28, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi James. The obvious problem the traditionalist historians/writers
                        > have in the Bloody Bill Anderson case

                        Jay,

                        I don't think they "have a problem". However, you seem to "have a
                        problem" with them. I'm not saying history is always correct or even
                        has the facts right. I will say that their are to many people that
                        have problems with "the traditionalist historians/writers" and are
                        looking for a soapbox to stand on.

                        James
                      • Jay Longley
                        Hi James. I agree I have many problems with them. One is that they obviously don t know how to count. ~Jay~ ... historians/writers ... even
                        Message 11 of 29 , Apr 29, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Hi James. I agree I have many problems with them. One is that they
                          obviously don't know how to count.
                          ~Jay~




                          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Durney" <JWD2044@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@>
                          > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Hi James. The obvious problem the traditionalist
                          historians/writers
                          > > have in the Bloody Bill Anderson case
                          >
                          > Jay,
                          >
                          > I don't think they "have a problem". However, you seem to "have a
                          > problem" with them. I'm not saying history is always correct or
                          even
                          > has the facts right. I will say that their are to many people that
                          > have problems with "the traditionalist historians/writers" and are
                          > looking for a soapbox to stand on.
                          >
                          > James
                          >
                        • Tom Mix
                          Jay, Which account do you feel to be the most believable? Tom ... From: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com [mailto:civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jay
                          Message 12 of 29 , Apr 29, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Message
                            Jay,
                            Which account do you feel to be the most believable?
                            Tom
                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com [mailto:civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jay Longley
                            Sent: Sunday, April 29, 2007 4:42 PM
                            To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Gunshots they claim killed Bill Anderson.

                            Hi James. I agree I have many problems with them. One is that they
                            obviously don't know how to count.
                            ~Jay~

                            --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, "James W. Durney" <JWD2044@... >
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > --- In civilwarwest@ yahoogroups. com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@ >
                            > wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Hi James. The obvious problem the traditionalist
                            historians/writers
                            > > have in the Bloody Bill Anderson case
                            >
                            > Jay,
                            >
                            > I don't think they "have a problem". However, you seem to "have a
                            > problem" with them. I'm not saying history is always correct or
                            even
                            > has the facts right. I will say that their are to many people that
                            > have problems with "the traditionalist historians/writers" and are
                            > looking for a soapbox to stand on.
                            >
                            > James
                            >

                          • keeno2@aol.com
                            I suspect that very few, if any, reporters were there or close enough to view the body and count the bullet holes. Quite a bit of what passes for eyewitness
                            Message 13 of 29 , Apr 29, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              I suspect that very few, if any, reporters were there or close enough to view the body and count the bullet holes. Quite a bit of what passes for eyewitness reports is 3rd or 4th hand hearsay.
                               
                              There are many, but a classic is the newspaper reports that, at Shiloh, soldiers were bayonetted in their bedrolls. Sounds just like something a soldier below the bank would say to justify his run to the rear.
                               
                              Ken




                              See what's free at AOL.com.
                            • Jay Longley
                              Hi Tom. While we have proven all of the traditional accounts false, if I was just beginning my study of Bloody Bill Anderson, I would probably think that Lt.
                              Message 14 of 29 , Apr 30, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Hi Tom. While we have proven all of the traditional accounts false,
                                if I was just beginning my study of Bloody Bill Anderson, I would
                                probably think that Lt. Col. S.P. Cox's Official Report was the most
                                believable. The only account of the ambush that has not been proven
                                faulty was the one given to newspaperman Henry C. Fuller in 1924 by
                                William C. Anderson of Salt Creek, Brown County, Texas.
                                Thank you,
                                ~Jay~



                                --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Mix" <tmix@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Jay,
                                > Which account do you feel to be the most believable?
                                > Tom
                                >
                                > -----Original Message-----
                                > From: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                [mailto:civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com] On
                                > Behalf Of Jay Longley
                                > Sent: Sunday, April 29, 2007 4:42 PM
                                > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                > Subject: [civilwarwest] Re: Gunshots they claim killed Bill
                                Anderson.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Hi James. I agree I have many problems with them. One is that they
                                > obviously don't know how to count.
                                > ~Jay~
                                >
                                > --- In civilwarwest@ <mailto:civilwarwest%40yahoogroups.com>
                                > yahoogroups.com, "James W. Durney" <JWD2044@>
                                > wrote:
                                > >
                                > > --- In civilwarwest@ <mailto:civilwarwest%40yahoogroups.com>
                                > yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@>
                                > > wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > Hi James. The obvious problem the traditionalist
                                > historians/writers
                                > > > have in the Bloody Bill Anderson case
                                > >
                                > > Jay,
                                > >
                                > > I don't think they "have a problem". However, you seem to "have a
                                > > problem" with them. I'm not saying history is always correct or
                                > even
                                > > has the facts right. I will say that their are to many people
                                that
                                > > have problems with "the traditionalist historians/writers" and
                                are
                                > > looking for a soapbox to stand on.
                                > >
                                > > James
                                > >
                                >
                              • Jay Longley
                                Hi Ken. They went to great lengths to photograph the body of the guerrilla killed so there should have been at least one accurate account of the bullet wounds
                                Message 15 of 29 , Apr 30, 2007
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                                  Hi Ken. They went to great lengths to photograph the body of the
                                  guerrilla killed so there should have been at least one accurate
                                  account of the bullet wounds on it. Bloody Bill Anderson was the
                                  most hunted guerrilla leader at the time so it is unreasonable for me
                                  to accept their excuse that he was dumped in a grave without
                                  analyzing the cause of death, the number and location of all wounds
                                  to the body.
                                  ~Jay~



                                  --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I suspect that very few, if any, reporters were there or close
                                  enough to view
                                  > the body and count the bullet holes. Quite a bit of what passes for
                                  > eyewitness reports is 3rd or 4th hand hearsay.
                                  >
                                  > There are many, but a classic is the newspaper reports that, at
                                  Shiloh,
                                  > soldiers were bayonetted in their bedrolls. Sounds just like
                                  something a soldier
                                  > below the bank would say to justify his run to the rear.
                                  >
                                  > Ken
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ************************************** See what's free at
                                  http://www.aol.com
                                  >
                                • keeno2@aol.com
                                  In a message dated 4/30/2007 5:41:42 PM Central Daylight Time, jay_longley@yahoo.com writes: Hi Ken. They went to great lengths to photograph the body of the
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Apr 30, 2007
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    In a message dated 4/30/2007 5:41:42 PM Central Daylight Time, jay_longley@... writes:
                                    Hi Ken.  They went to great lengths to photograph the body of the guerrilla killed so there should have been at least one accurate account of the bullet wounds on it.  Bloody Bill Anderson was the most hunted guerrilla leader at the time so it is unreasonable for me to accept their excuse that he was dumped in a grave without analyzing the cause of death, the number and location of all wounds to the body.
                                    If there is photographic record of the wounds, that really ought to point to which account is more accurate. Oughtn't it? Interesting bit of trivia, by the way. Like to read these things that are seemingly trivial, but I'm a freak for accuracy, even if I don't much care what actually happened to Bloody Bill.
                                     
                                    Ken




                                    See what's free at AOL.com.
                                  • Jay Longley
                                    Hi Ken. There were a few poses taken of the guerrilla killed that day who they claimed was Bloody Bill Anderson. We have thoroughly analyzed each of these
                                    Message 17 of 29 , May 1, 2007
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Hi Ken. There were a few poses taken of the guerrilla killed that
                                      day who they claimed was Bloody Bill Anderson. We have thoroughly
                                      analyzed each of these photographs and the body looks like that of a
                                      man getting ready to go out on the town and shows no bloodstained
                                      clothes or solid evidence of either entrance or exit wounds. A book
                                      could be written about these photographs alone and the many questions
                                      they raise. I share your appreciation for accuracy in history and
                                      assure you that the more you look into the traditional Bloody Bill
                                      Anderson stories, the more inaccuracies you will discover. After a
                                      year of researching and investigating Bloody Bill Anderson's life, I
                                      have found it is the most fascinating historical study I have ever
                                      taken part in.
                                      Thanks,
                                      ~Jay~



                                      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > In a message dated 4/30/2007 5:41:42 PM Central Daylight Time,
                                      > jay_longley@... writes:
                                      >
                                      > Hi Ken. They went to great lengths to photograph the body of the
                                      guerrilla
                                      > killed so there should have been at least one accurate account of
                                      the bullet
                                      > wounds on it. Bloody Bill Anderson was the most hunted guerrilla
                                      leader at the
                                      > time so it is unreasonable for me to accept their excuse that he
                                      was dumped in
                                      > a grave without analyzing the cause of death, the number and
                                      location of all
                                      > wounds to the body.
                                      >
                                      > If there is photographic record of the wounds, that really ought to
                                      point to
                                      > which account is more accurate. Oughtn't it? Interesting bit of
                                      trivia, by the
                                      > way. Like to read these things that are seemingly trivial, but I'm
                                      a freak
                                      > for accuracy, even if I don't much care what actually happened to
                                      Bloody Bill.
                                      >
                                      > Ken
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ************************************** See what's free at
                                      http://www.aol.com
                                      >
                                    • Carl Williams
                                      As for the thought that maybe people at the time did not think an autopsy was important, you *should* look at Booth s autopsy. This was conducted on the
                                      Message 18 of 29 , May 3, 2007
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        As for the thought that maybe people at the time did not think an
                                        autopsy was important, you *should* look at Booth's autopsy. This was
                                        conducted on the monitor Montauk and every effort was made to show the
                                        public the body was clearly Booth's [see link below]. This means my
                                        memory was wrong about Booth's autopsy, but I've delved a little
                                        deeper and it seems that maybe some controversy was stirred up over
                                        Mudd's identifying a different limb as broken? [can't seem to get this
                                        straight using the internet].
                                        In any case, people at the time would have known identifying Anderson
                                        properly was important. It is a fact that the law in general by this
                                        time placed great value on such proper identification, it having such
                                        impact on murder charges, life insurance claims, etc. Of course one
                                        would suspect that on the Frontier, there were bigger problems doing
                                        things properly.

                                        http://home.att.net/~rjnorton/Lincoln83.html

                                        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@...>
                                        wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Hi Ken. There were a few poses taken of the guerrilla killed that
                                        > day who they claimed was Bloody Bill Anderson. We have thoroughly
                                        > analyzed each of these photographs and the body looks like that of a
                                        > man getting ready to go out on the town and shows no bloodstained
                                        > clothes or solid evidence of either entrance or exit wounds. A book
                                        > could be written about these photographs alone and the many questions
                                        > they raise. I share your appreciation for accuracy in history and
                                        > assure you that the more you look into the traditional Bloody Bill
                                        > Anderson stories, the more inaccuracies you will discover. After a
                                        > year of researching and investigating Bloody Bill Anderson's life, I
                                        > have found it is the most fascinating historical study I have ever
                                        > taken part in.
                                        > Thanks,
                                        > ~Jay~
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@ wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > In a message dated 4/30/2007 5:41:42 PM Central Daylight Time,
                                        > > jay_longley@ writes:
                                        > >
                                        > > Hi Ken. They went to great lengths to photograph the body of the
                                        > guerrilla
                                        > > killed so there should have been at least one accurate account of
                                        > the bullet
                                        > > wounds on it. Bloody Bill Anderson was the most hunted guerrilla
                                        > leader at the
                                        > > time so it is unreasonable for me to accept their excuse that he
                                        > was dumped in
                                        > > a grave without analyzing the cause of death, the number and
                                        > location of all
                                        > > wounds to the body.
                                        > >
                                        > > If there is photographic record of the wounds, that really ought to
                                        > point to
                                        > > which account is more accurate. Oughtn't it? Interesting bit of
                                        > trivia, by the
                                        > > way. Like to read these things that are seemingly trivial, but I'm
                                        > a freak
                                        > > for accuracy, even if I don't much care what actually happened to
                                        > Bloody Bill.
                                        > >
                                        > > Ken
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > ************************************** See what's free at
                                        > http://www.aol.com
                                        > >
                                        >
                                      • James W. Durney
                                        ... was ... the ... this ... Anderson ... such ... Lincoln s killer and Blood Bill Anderson and not in the same league when it comes to handling their body.
                                        Message 19 of 29 , May 4, 2007
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
                                          wrote:
                                          >
                                          > As for the thought that maybe people at the time did not think an
                                          > autopsy was important, you *should* look at Booth's autopsy. This
                                          was
                                          > conducted on the monitor Montauk and every effort was made to show
                                          the
                                          > public the body was clearly Booth's [see link below]. This means my
                                          > memory was wrong about Booth's autopsy, but I've delved a little
                                          > deeper and it seems that maybe some controversy was stirred up over
                                          > Mudd's identifying a different limb as broken? [can't seem to get
                                          this
                                          > straight using the internet].
                                          > In any case, people at the time would have known identifying
                                          Anderson
                                          > properly was important. It is a fact that the law in general by this
                                          > time placed great value on such proper identification, it having
                                          such
                                          > impact on murder charges, life insurance claims, etc. Of course one
                                          > would suspect that on the Frontier, there were bigger problems doing
                                          > things properly.
                                          >

                                          Lincoln's killer and Blood Bill Anderson and not in the same league
                                          when it comes to handling their body. As you stated "on the
                                          Frontier" things were different than in Washington. In addition,
                                          after the "Yup, that's him" what more would you have expected of them?

                                          James
                                        • Jay Longley
                                          Hello Carl. Thank you for your interesting and correct analysis of the importance of properly noting the way that this guerrilla, who they claimed was Bloody
                                          Message 20 of 29 , May 5, 2007
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            Hello Carl. Thank you for your interesting and correct analysis of
                                            the importance of properly noting the way that this guerrilla, who
                                            they claimed was Bloody Bill Anderson, was killed. History clearly
                                            shows that Bill Anderson was the most hunted guerrilla leader,
                                            probably even the most hunted person, in Missouri at the time. The
                                            Official Records are full of desperate attempts to stop him. Add to
                                            this the fact that the Yankees mis-identified other guerrillas as
                                            being Bloody Bill Anderson on at least two other occasions make
                                            accuracy of extreme importance.
                                            ~Jay~





                                            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
                                            wrote:
                                            >
                                            > As for the thought that maybe people at the time did not think an
                                            > autopsy was important, you *should* look at Booth's autopsy. This
                                            was
                                            > conducted on the monitor Montauk and every effort was made to show
                                            the
                                            > public the body was clearly Booth's [see link below]. This means my
                                            > memory was wrong about Booth's autopsy, but I've delved a little
                                            > deeper and it seems that maybe some controversy was stirred up over
                                            > Mudd's identifying a different limb as broken? [can't seem to get
                                            this
                                            > straight using the internet].
                                            > In any case, people at the time would have known identifying
                                            Anderson
                                            > properly was important. It is a fact that the law in general by this
                                            > time placed great value on such proper identification, it having
                                            such
                                            > impact on murder charges, life insurance claims, etc. Of course one
                                            > would suspect that on the Frontier, there were bigger problems doing
                                            > things properly.
                                            >
                                            > http://home.att.net/~rjnorton/Lincoln83.html
                                            >
                                            > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@>
                                            > wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > Hi Ken. There were a few poses taken of the guerrilla killed
                                            that
                                            > > day who they claimed was Bloody Bill Anderson. We have
                                            thoroughly
                                            > > analyzed each of these photographs and the body looks like that
                                            of a
                                            > > man getting ready to go out on the town and shows no bloodstained
                                            > > clothes or solid evidence of either entrance or exit wounds. A
                                            book
                                            > > could be written about these photographs alone and the many
                                            questions
                                            > > they raise. I share your appreciation for accuracy in history
                                            and
                                            > > assure you that the more you look into the traditional Bloody
                                            Bill
                                            > > Anderson stories, the more inaccuracies you will discover. After
                                            a
                                            > > year of researching and investigating Bloody Bill Anderson's
                                            life, I
                                            > > have found it is the most fascinating historical study I have
                                            ever
                                            > > taken part in.
                                            > > Thanks,
                                            > > ~Jay~
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@ wrote:
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > > In a message dated 4/30/2007 5:41:42 PM Central Daylight Time,
                                            > > > jay_longley@ writes:
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Hi Ken. They went to great lengths to photograph the body of
                                            the
                                            > > guerrilla
                                            > > > killed so there should have been at least one accurate account
                                            of
                                            > > the bullet
                                            > > > wounds on it. Bloody Bill Anderson was the most hunted
                                            guerrilla
                                            > > leader at the
                                            > > > time so it is unreasonable for me to accept their excuse that
                                            he
                                            > > was dumped in
                                            > > > a grave without analyzing the cause of death, the number and
                                            > > location of all
                                            > > > wounds to the body.
                                            > > >
                                            > > > If there is photographic record of the wounds, that really
                                            ought to
                                            > > point to
                                            > > > which account is more accurate. Oughtn't it? Interesting bit of
                                            > > trivia, by the
                                            > > > way. Like to read these things that are seemingly trivial, but
                                            I'm
                                            > > a freak
                                            > > > for accuracy, even if I don't much care what actually happened
                                            to
                                            > > Bloody Bill.
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Ken
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > > ************************************** See what's free at
                                            > > http://www.aol.com
                                            > > >
                                            > >
                                            >
                                          • Jay Longley
                                            Hi Tom. I firmly believe that our in-depth investigation has proven that Bloody Bill Anderson was not killed in 1864. I believe he escaped, as he admitted in
                                            Message 21 of 29 , May 5, 2007
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              Hi Tom. I firmly believe that our in-depth investigation has proven
                                              that Bloody Bill Anderson was not killed in 1864. I believe he
                                              escaped, as he admitted in his 1924 interviews with Henry C. Fuller,
                                              and settled in Brown County in central Texas. I wish to thank you
                                              for taking the time necessary to study this one point of the ambush
                                              stories. If you will email me privately, I will reply with the way
                                              to access our information.

                                              jay_longley@...

                                              ~Jay~





                                              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Mix" <tmix@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > Jay,
                                              >
                                              > Thanks for the fascinating accounts. Is there one that you agree
                                              with? If so
                                              > why? If not, why not?
                                              >
                                              > I don't know as much about Anderson and Missouri as I do other
                                              areas of the
                                              > war. I found your information very interesting and informative.
                                              >
                                              > Tom
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > -----Original Message-----
                                              > From: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                              [mailto:civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com] On
                                              > Behalf Of Jay Longley
                                              > Sent: Friday, April 27, 2007 6:48 PM
                                              > To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                              > Subject: [civilwarwest] Gunshots they claim killed Bill Anderson.
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the Bloody Bill
                                              > Anderson story has been presented by historians and writers for
                                              over
                                              > 140 years, has been the many contradictory accounts of both the
                                              > number of gunshots and the location of gunshot wounds these writers
                                              > claim killed Bloody Bill Anderson in the ambush near Orrick,
                                              Missouri
                                              > on October 26th or 27th depending on which story you believe. Going
                                              > back through my notes on this event, I came across over a dozen
                                              > different and contradictory stories of both the number of gunshots
                                              > this guerrilla was said to have taken and their location on the
                                              body.
                                              > The contradictions are quite obvious and the differences are as
                                              > numerous as the writers who told about these very important
                                              gunshots.
                                              > If one accepts that Bloody Bill Anderson was killed in this ambush,
                                              > which I don't, then it must be amply certain that only one of these
                                              > reports can possibly be the true account. I will give you all just
                                              a
                                              > sampling of these accounts and will leave it up to those who have
                                              > written and published these opposing versions to explain their
                                              > positions and give their sources.
                                              > ****
                                              >
                                              > The following article was written, on October 8, 1989, by Lorene
                                              > Bishop who was a writer for the Brownwood Bulletin and President of
                                              > the Brown County Historical Society. Lorene Bishop, as almost every
                                              > reputable Brown County historian believed firmly that Bloody Bill
                                              > Anderson lived out his life in Brown County, Texas until his death
                                              in
                                              > 1927. I am posting only the portion of Bishop's book that deals
                                              with
                                              > the ambush below as told by James S. Hackley:
                                              >
                                              > "... The existence of the Bill Anderson of Texas that became known
                                              to
                                              > Missourians in 1924 when a short article about him appeared in The
                                              > Houston Post and was copied in Missouri papers. At once Colonel
                                              > James S. Hackley, an early settler of Mobeby Missouri present his
                                              > knowledge of the facts preceeding the slaying. His story indicates
                                              > that the guerrilla's body was identified by his, Hackley's mother,
                                              a
                                              > cousin of the slain Confederate irregular...
                                              > Four weeks later we drove to Richmond to my mother's brother. When
                                              > my uncle came out to greet my mother, a boy ran up and said that
                                              Bill
                                              > Anderson had been killed and his body was at Tice's gallery.
                                              > We went to Tice's gallery. When my mother saw the blood on
                                              > Anderson's face, and his clotted hair, she pleaded that the picture
                                              > not be taken until she had washed his face and combed his hair. Her
                                              > plea was refused by Captain Cox, who was present and claimed to
                                              have
                                              > killed Anderson.
                                              > Anderson was buried in Richmond. The bullet that ended his life
                                              > struck him in the back of his head and came out through his
                                              > forehead.' "
                                              >
                                              > (This account says ONE bullet "struck him in the back of the head
                                              and
                                              > came out through his forehead.")
                                              > ***
                                              >
                                              > This next account is from the War of the Rebellion Records and
                                              comes
                                              > from no other that Lt. Colonel S.P. Cox himself.
                                              >
                                              > "Report of Lieut. Col. Samuel P. Cox, Thirty-third Infanty Enrolled
                                              > Missouri Militia.
                                              > Richmond, Mo., October 27, 1864.
                                              >
                                              > DEAR SIR: We have the honor to report the result of our expedition
                                              on
                                              > yesterday against the notorious bushwhacker, William T. Anderson
                                              and
                                              > his forces, near Albany, in the soutwest corner of this county
                                              (Ray).
                                              > Learning his whereabouts we struck camp on yesterday morning
                                              > and made a forced march and came in contact with their pickets
                                              about
                                              > a mile this side of Albany; drove them in and through Albany and
                                              into
                                              > the woods beyond. We dismounted our men in the town, threw our
                                              > infantry force into the woods beyond, sending a cavalry advance who
                                              > engaged the enemy and fell back, when Anderson and his fiendish
                                              gang,
                                              > about 300 strong, raised the Indian yell and came in full speed
                                              upon
                                              > our lines, shooting and yelling as they came. Our lines held their
                                              > position without a break.The notorious bushwhacker, Anderson, and
                                              one
                                              > of his men, supposed to be Captain Rains, son of General Rains,
                                              > charged through our lines. Anderson was killed and fell some fifty
                                              > steps in our rear, receiving two balls in the side of the head.
                                              Rains
                                              > made his escape and their forces retreated in full speed, being
                                              > completely routed; our cavalry pursued them some ten miles, finding
                                              > the road strewn with blood for miles. We hear of them scattered in
                                              > various directions, some considerable force of them making thier
                                              way
                                              > toward Richfield, in Clay County. We capured on Anderson private
                                              > papers and orders from General Price that identify him beyond a
                                              > doubt.
                                              > I have the honor to report that my officers and me conducted
                                              > themselves well and fought bravely on the field. We had 4 men
                                              > wounded; lost none. The forces of my command consisted of a portion
                                              > of Major Grimes, of Ray County, Fifty first Regiment Enrolled
                                              > Missouri Militia, and a portion of the Thirty-Third Enrolled
                                              Missouri
                                              > Militia, from Daviess and Caldwell Counties.
                                              >
                                              > Respectfully yours,
                                              >
                                              > S.P. COX
                                              > Lieut. Col., Comdg. Thirty-third Regt. Enrolled Missouri
                                              > Militia.
                                              > GENERAL CRAIG
                                              >
                                              > (This one claims Anderson was hit with "two balls in the side of
                                              the
                                              > head." Quite a feat of markmanship I would say.)
                                              >
                                              > ***
                                              > The next is from a message by one of the members of our Bloody Bill
                                              > Anderson Mystery group, Laura Anderson Way, in which she quotes
                                              Paul
                                              > Petersen.
                                              >
                                              > "The following is from the book "Quantrill of Missouri" by Paul
                                              > Petersen, page 392 and 393."
                                              >
                                              > "In late October, in Ray County, Anderson saw the report that Price
                                              > had been defeated and that George Todd had been killed. On October
                                              24
                                              > he determined to punish the Federals for the Southern defeat at
                                              > Westport."
                                              >
                                              > "Harrison Trow recalled that William Smith, a veteran guerrilla
                                              with
                                              > four years' experience, rode next to Anderson. Trow claimed that
                                              five
                                              > bullets struck Smith and three struck Anderson, and at the end of
                                              the
                                              > fight, both men were dead."
                                              >
                                              > (Here Trow is quoted as saying "three (bullets) struck Anderson.
                                              > Another strange fact is that, while this report claims William
                                              Smith
                                              > was killed in this ambush, Smith's name appears nowhere on the
                                              > monument erected to the guerrillas killed that day.)
                                              >
                                              > ***
                                              > From: http://www.history
                                              > <http://www.history.com/tdih.do?action=tdihArticleYear&id=2366>
                                              > com/tdih.do?action=tdihArticleYear&id=2366
                                              >
                                              > "...Anderson went to Texas that winter, got married, and returned
                                              to
                                              > Missouri in 1864 with a band of about 50 fighters. Anderson
                                              embarked
                                              > on a summer of violence, leading his group on a campaign that
                                              killed
                                              > hundreds and caused extensive damage. The climax came on September
                                              27
                                              > when Anderson's gang joined with several others to pillage the town
                                              > of Centralia, Missouri. When more than 100 Union soldiers pursued
                                              > them, the guerillas ambushed and massacred the entire detachment.
                                              > Just a month later, Anderson's band was caught in a Union ambush
                                              > outside of Albany, Missouri, and Anderson was killed by two bullets
                                              > to his head. The body of the "blood-drenched savage," as he became
                                              > known in the area, was placed on public display. Anderson kept a
                                              rope
                                              > to record his killings, and there were 54 knots in it at the time
                                              of
                                              > his death..."
                                              >
                                              > ***
                                              >
                                              > From:
                                              > http://www.bullshid <http://www.bullshido.net/modules.>
                                              o.net/modules. php?
                                              > name=Reviews& file=viewarticle &id=291
                                              >
                                              > Adult language is used on that site.
                                              >
                                              > "...After completely decimating the town, he moved his men to the
                                              > south of town and set up an ambush for 150 Union Calvary men moving
                                              > in after him. They killed 116 of them. They shot them through the
                                              > head, then scalped them and thrust them with bayonets. They even
                                              > chopped of ears and noses.
                                              >
                                              > On October 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox and
                                              > his Union troops. He and one other man charged the line guns
                                              blazing.
                                              > His horse was shot and he bit the dust, he was then shot in the
                                              back
                                              > of the head 2 times. His body was taken to Richmond, Missouri where
                                              > they decapitated his corpse and stuck his head on a telegraph pole.
                                              > His body was then dragged through the streets and dumped in an
                                              > unmarked grave.
                                              >
                                              > Bloody Bill was passionate, angry and ruthless ~ described by Jim
                                              > Cummins as "The most desperate man I ever met." "
                                              >
                                              > (This one seems to be saying Anderson's horse "bit the dust" and
                                              then
                                              > Anderson was executed with two shots in the back of the head.)
                                              >
                                              > ***
                                              >
                                              > http://www.civilwar
                                              <http://www.civilwarhistory.com/quantrill/anderson.htm>
                                              > history.com/quantrill/anderson.htm
                                              >
                                              > "While leading his guerilla band near Orrick, Missouri on October
                                              > 27th 1864, Anderson was ambushed by Captain S.P.Cox and his Union
                                              > troops. Anderson was caught completely unaware and was riddled with
                                              > bullets then left for dead in his saddle. His loyal followers put
                                              up
                                              > a fight to try and recover Anderson's corpse, but they were driven
                                              > back by superior firepower.
                                              >
                                              > Anderson's body was taken to Richmond, Missouri where it was
                                              propped
                                              > up in a chair and a pistol was placed in the dead man's hand then
                                              > photographs were taken. A short while later, the Union troopers,
                                              full
                                              > of loathing for the dead man, decapitated Anderson and impaled his
                                              > head on a telegraph pole at the entrance to the town as a signature
                                              > to all that the infamous killer was indeed dead. Anderson's torso
                                              was
                                              > roped and tied to a horse then dragged along the streets of
                                              Richmond
                                              > before being dumped in an unmarked grave outside of town."
                                              >
                                              > (This is just one of many accounts that claim that Bill Anderson's
                                              > body was "riddled with bullets".)
                                              >
                                              > ***
                                              >
                                              > Carl W. Breihan tells the story a little different in his account
                                              > from page 78 of his "Killer Legions of Quantrill", 1971, by saying
                                              > the following:
                                              >
                                              > "...Anderson was the first to fall, his body caught in a crossfire
                                              > and riddled as he toppled from the saddle..."
                                              >
                                              > ***
                                              >
                                              > If it weren't for the seriousness of this historical event, all of
                                              > these different and contradictory accounts would be laughable. To
                                              say
                                              > the least, EVERY writer who has made money selling books containing
                                              a
                                              > version of this ambush story owes the American public an
                                              explanation
                                              > for writing whatever tale he/she chose to tell in the book(s),
                                              > regarding the way they claim Bloody Bill Anderson was killed that
                                              > day. They should step forward and give their sources for this
                                              > misinformation.
                                              > Thank you,
                                              > ~Jay~
                                              >
                                            • Bob Huddleston
                                              Of your sources, only two are of any value: Col. Cox s after action report and the 1924 newspaper account of Col. Hackley. (I assume it is a typo - the town is
                                              Message 22 of 29 , May 6, 2007
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                Of your sources, only two are of any value: Col. Cox's after action report
                                                and the 1924 newspaper account of Col. Hackley. (I assume it is a typo - the
                                                town is "Mobley").

                                                Unless there are good footnotes that you did not supply, none of the
                                                secondary accounts are worth anything. The closest would be Harrison Trow.
                                                However, his book, _Charles W. Quantrell; a True History of His Guerrilla
                                                Warfare on the Missouri and Kansas Border During the Civil War of 1861-1865
                                                _, published in 1923, is a mishmash of rumor and legend. His recounting of
                                                Anderson's death reads like a movie and does not conform to either Cox's
                                                after action report, or other contemporary accounts. And as near as I can
                                                determine, he was not with Anderson in Ray County - indeed I could not
                                                determine if he was even with Quantrell during Price's Raid.

                                                You missed some other OR references to Anderson's demise. Samuel P. Cox was
                                                major of the First Battalion, Missouri State Militia from April 1862 until
                                                his resignation in January 1864. James Craig, commander of the "Enrolled
                                                Missouri Militia" (it requires a score card to keep track of all the
                                                different versions of troops, both Yankee and Rebel in Missouri!), asked Cox
                                                to serve without pay or commission, and get Anderson. Cox did.

                                                According to Craig, Cox secured from Anderson's body his pocket note book,
                                                containing letters from his wife, two orders to Anderson from Price, and a
                                                locket of his wife's hair. The body was identified by several residents
                                                while it was lying at the Richmond Court House. (Craig to Rosecrans's
                                                adjutant general, 30 October 1864, 86 OR 334). In addition, a report on the
                                                fight mentions a Confederate flag with an inscription from a female admirer,
                                                "Presented to W. L. (sic) Anderson by his friend, F.M.R. Let it not be
                                                contaminated by Fed. Hands." (See Castel, _Bloody Bill Anderson: The Short
                                                Savage Life of a Civil War Guerrilla _, 126)

                                                Your contention about the wounds received is a non-story. Hackley is
                                                recalling something which happened sixty-one years before and one would
                                                expect his details to be sketchy. You will note that his mother, a cousin,
                                                identified the body as Anderson's. By the way, the photographer was Dr.
                                                Robert Kice, a dentist in Richmond who had a sideline taking pictures. Not
                                                Tice. Obviously the man who was photographed did not get shot though the
                                                head from rear to front. The contemporary reports say twice in the side of
                                                the head, which is consistent with Anderson riding into Cox's lines, not in
                                                the back, unless it was "friendly fire"!

                                                The finest historians on the Civil War in Missouri are Albert Castel, who
                                                had published several well researched books on what William Freehling calls
                                                "the world class guerilla war" in the state; Thomas Goodrich, especially his
                                                _Black Flag: Guerrilla Warfare on the Western Border, 1861-1865 _; and
                                                Michael Fellman, _ Inside War: The Guerrilla Conflict in Missouri During the
                                                American Civil War _. They are in agreement that it was Anderson who was
                                                killed near Albany, Mo., in October, 1864. The body was not mutilated,
                                                except for the ring finger being cut off - which can be seen in the photos.
                                                Anderson was buried in an unmarked grave, after which some of the militia
                                                urinated on it.

                                                BTW, did you write the biography in Wikipedia?

                                                Take care,

                                                Bob

                                                Judy and Bob Huddleston
                                                10643 Sperry Street
                                                Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
                                                303.451.6376 Huddleston.r@...

                                                And so to the end of history, murder shall breed murder, always in the name
                                                of right and honour and peace, until the Gods are tired of blood and create
                                                a race that can understand." - George Bernard Shaw, "Caesar and Cleopatra"
                                              • Jay Longley
                                                Hi Bob. As I stated in my post, I located more than a dozen such contradictions as to the number and location of the bullet wounds. My original message dealt
                                                Message 23 of 29 , May 6, 2007
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                                                  Hi Bob. As I stated in my post, I located more than a dozen such
                                                  contradictions as to the number and location of the bullet wounds.
                                                  My original message dealt only with this specific part, the gunshots,
                                                  of the traditionalist stories about the ambush and its aftermath. I
                                                  have read most of the books you mention and the researchers helping
                                                  me have gone over all of these other points fully and thoroughly and
                                                  are still actively working on them. Since my time is very limited,
                                                  by my investigation into Bloody Bill Anderson, I am of course unable
                                                  to present every detail of our findings on other boards but I assure
                                                  you we have conducted the most thorough investigation into the life
                                                  and death of Bloody Bill Anderson that has ever been conducted and we
                                                  are far from finished.
                                                  Thank you,
                                                  ~Jay~




                                                  --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Huddleston"
                                                  <huddleston.r@...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > Of your sources, only two are of any value: Col. Cox's after action
                                                  report
                                                  > and the 1924 newspaper account of Col. Hackley. (I assume it is a
                                                  typo - the
                                                  > town is "Mobley").
                                                  >
                                                  > Unless there are good footnotes that you did not supply, none of the
                                                  > secondary accounts are worth anything. The closest would be
                                                  Harrison Trow.
                                                  > However, his book, _Charles W. Quantrell; a True History of His
                                                  Guerrilla
                                                  > Warfare on the Missouri and Kansas Border During the Civil War of
                                                  1861-1865
                                                  > _, published in 1923, is a mishmash of rumor and legend. His
                                                  recounting of
                                                  > Anderson's death reads like a movie and does not conform to either
                                                  Cox's
                                                  > after action report, or other contemporary accounts. And as near as
                                                  I can
                                                  > determine, he was not with Anderson in Ray County - indeed I could
                                                  not
                                                  > determine if he was even with Quantrell during Price's Raid.
                                                  >
                                                  > You missed some other OR references to Anderson's demise. Samuel P.
                                                  Cox was
                                                  > major of the First Battalion, Missouri State Militia from April
                                                  1862 until
                                                  > his resignation in January 1864. James Craig, commander of
                                                  the "Enrolled
                                                  > Missouri Militia" (it requires a score card to keep track of all the
                                                  > different versions of troops, both Yankee and Rebel in Missouri!),
                                                  asked Cox
                                                  > to serve without pay or commission, and get Anderson. Cox did.
                                                  >
                                                  > According to Craig, Cox secured from Anderson's body his pocket
                                                  note book,
                                                  > containing letters from his wife, two orders to Anderson from
                                                  Price, and a
                                                  > locket of his wife's hair. The body was identified by several
                                                  residents
                                                  > while it was lying at the Richmond Court House. (Craig to
                                                  Rosecrans's
                                                  > adjutant general, 30 October 1864, 86 OR 334). In addition, a
                                                  report on the
                                                  > fight mentions a Confederate flag with an inscription from a female
                                                  admirer,
                                                  > "Presented to W. L. (sic) Anderson by his friend, F.M.R. Let it not
                                                  be
                                                  > contaminated by Fed. Hands." (See Castel, _Bloody Bill Anderson:
                                                  The Short
                                                  > Savage Life of a Civil War Guerrilla _, 126)
                                                  >
                                                  > Your contention about the wounds received is a non-story. Hackley is
                                                  > recalling something which happened sixty-one years before and one
                                                  would
                                                  > expect his details to be sketchy. You will note that his mother, a
                                                  cousin,
                                                  > identified the body as Anderson's. By the way, the photographer was
                                                  Dr.
                                                  > Robert Kice, a dentist in Richmond who had a sideline taking
                                                  pictures. Not
                                                  > Tice. Obviously the man who was photographed did not get shot
                                                  though the
                                                  > head from rear to front. The contemporary reports say twice in the
                                                  side of
                                                  > the head, which is consistent with Anderson riding into Cox's
                                                  lines, not in
                                                  > the back, unless it was "friendly fire"!
                                                  >
                                                  > The finest historians on the Civil War in Missouri are Albert
                                                  Castel, who
                                                  > had published several well researched books on what William
                                                  Freehling calls
                                                  > "the world class guerilla war" in the state; Thomas Goodrich,
                                                  especially his
                                                  > _Black Flag: Guerrilla Warfare on the Western Border, 1861-1865 _;
                                                  and
                                                  > Michael Fellman, _ Inside War: The Guerrilla Conflict in Missouri
                                                  During the
                                                  > American Civil War _. They are in agreement that it was Anderson
                                                  who was
                                                  > killed near Albany, Mo., in October, 1864. The body was not
                                                  mutilated,
                                                  > except for the ring finger being cut off - which can be seen in the
                                                  photos.
                                                  > Anderson was buried in an unmarked grave, after which some of the
                                                  militia
                                                  > urinated on it.
                                                  >
                                                  > BTW, did you write the biography in Wikipedia?
                                                  >
                                                  > Take care,
                                                  >
                                                  > Bob
                                                  >
                                                  > Judy and Bob Huddleston
                                                  > 10643 Sperry Street
                                                  > Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
                                                  > 303.451.6376 Huddleston.r@...
                                                  >
                                                  > And so to the end of history, murder shall breed murder, always in
                                                  the name
                                                  > of right and honour and peace, until the Gods are tired of blood
                                                  and create
                                                  > a race that can understand." - George Bernard Shaw, "Caesar and
                                                  Cleopatra"
                                                  >
                                                • hank9174
                                                  FWIW, as an example, there are many contradictions, subtle nuances and inaccuracies to the eyewitness accounts and later recollections of the wounding of
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , May 7, 2007
                                                  • 0 Attachment
                                                    FWIW, as an example, there are many contradictions, subtle nuances
                                                    and inaccuracies to the eyewitness accounts and later recollections
                                                    of the wounding of Stonewall Jackson.


                                                    HankC

                                                    --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@...>
                                                    wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > Hi Bob. As I stated in my post, I located more than a dozen such
                                                    > contradictions as to the number and location of the bullet wounds.
                                                    > My original message dealt only with this specific part, the
                                                    gunshots,
                                                    > of the traditionalist stories about the ambush and its aftermath.
                                                    I
                                                    > have read most of the books you mention and the researchers helping
                                                    > me have gone over all of these other points fully and thoroughly
                                                    and
                                                    > are still actively working on them. Since my time is very limited,
                                                    > by my investigation into Bloody Bill Anderson, I am of course
                                                    unable
                                                    > to present every detail of our findings on other boards but I
                                                    assure
                                                    > you we have conducted the most thorough investigation into the life
                                                    > and death of Bloody Bill Anderson that has ever been conducted and
                                                    we
                                                    > are far from finished.
                                                    > Thank you,
                                                    > ~Jay~
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Huddleston"
                                                    > <huddleston.r@> wrote:
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Of your sources, only two are of any value: Col. Cox's after
                                                    action
                                                    > report
                                                    > > and the 1924 newspaper account of Col. Hackley. (I assume it is a
                                                    > typo - the
                                                    > > town is "Mobley").
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Unless there are good footnotes that you did not supply, none of
                                                    the
                                                    > > secondary accounts are worth anything. The closest would be
                                                    > Harrison Trow.
                                                    > > However, his book, _Charles W. Quantrell; a True History of His
                                                    > Guerrilla
                                                    > > Warfare on the Missouri and Kansas Border During the Civil War of
                                                    > 1861-1865
                                                    > > _, published in 1923, is a mishmash of rumor and legend. His
                                                    > recounting of
                                                    > > Anderson's death reads like a movie and does not conform to
                                                    either
                                                    > Cox's
                                                    > > after action report, or other contemporary accounts. And as near
                                                    as
                                                    > I can
                                                    > > determine, he was not with Anderson in Ray County - indeed I
                                                    could
                                                    > not
                                                    > > determine if he was even with Quantrell during Price's Raid.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > You missed some other OR references to Anderson's demise. Samuel
                                                    P.
                                                    > Cox was
                                                    > > major of the First Battalion, Missouri State Militia from April
                                                    > 1862 until
                                                    > > his resignation in January 1864. James Craig, commander of
                                                    > the "Enrolled
                                                    > > Missouri Militia" (it requires a score card to keep track of all
                                                    the
                                                    > > different versions of troops, both Yankee and Rebel in
                                                    Missouri!),
                                                    > asked Cox
                                                    > > to serve without pay or commission, and get Anderson. Cox did.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > According to Craig, Cox secured from Anderson's body his pocket
                                                    > note book,
                                                    > > containing letters from his wife, two orders to Anderson from
                                                    > Price, and a
                                                    > > locket of his wife's hair. The body was identified by several
                                                    > residents
                                                    > > while it was lying at the Richmond Court House. (Craig to
                                                    > Rosecrans's
                                                    > > adjutant general, 30 October 1864, 86 OR 334). In addition, a
                                                    > report on the
                                                    > > fight mentions a Confederate flag with an inscription from a
                                                    female
                                                    > admirer,
                                                    > > "Presented to W. L. (sic) Anderson by his friend, F.M.R. Let it
                                                    not
                                                    > be
                                                    > > contaminated by Fed. Hands." (See Castel, _Bloody Bill Anderson:
                                                    > The Short
                                                    > > Savage Life of a Civil War Guerrilla _, 126)
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Your contention about the wounds received is a non-story. Hackley
                                                    is
                                                    > > recalling something which happened sixty-one years before and one
                                                    > would
                                                    > > expect his details to be sketchy. You will note that his mother,
                                                    a
                                                    > cousin,
                                                    > > identified the body as Anderson's. By the way, the photographer
                                                    was
                                                    > Dr.
                                                    > > Robert Kice, a dentist in Richmond who had a sideline taking
                                                    > pictures. Not
                                                    > > Tice. Obviously the man who was photographed did not get shot
                                                    > though the
                                                    > > head from rear to front. The contemporary reports say twice in
                                                    the
                                                    > side of
                                                    > > the head, which is consistent with Anderson riding into Cox's
                                                    > lines, not in
                                                    > > the back, unless it was "friendly fire"!
                                                    > >
                                                    > > The finest historians on the Civil War in Missouri are Albert
                                                    > Castel, who
                                                    > > had published several well researched books on what William
                                                    > Freehling calls
                                                    > > "the world class guerilla war" in the state; Thomas Goodrich,
                                                    > especially his
                                                    > > _Black Flag: Guerrilla Warfare on the Western Border, 1861-1865
                                                    _;
                                                    > and
                                                    > > Michael Fellman, _ Inside War: The Guerrilla Conflict in Missouri
                                                    > During the
                                                    > > American Civil War _. They are in agreement that it was Anderson
                                                    > who was
                                                    > > killed near Albany, Mo., in October, 1864. The body was not
                                                    > mutilated,
                                                    > > except for the ring finger being cut off - which can be seen in
                                                    the
                                                    > photos.
                                                    > > Anderson was buried in an unmarked grave, after which some of the
                                                    > militia
                                                    > > urinated on it.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > BTW, did you write the biography in Wikipedia?
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Take care,
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Bob
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Judy and Bob Huddleston
                                                    > > 10643 Sperry Street
                                                    > > Northglenn, CO 80234-3612
                                                    > > 303.451.6376 Huddleston.r@
                                                    > >
                                                    > > And so to the end of history, murder shall breed murder, always
                                                    in
                                                    > the name
                                                    > > of right and honour and peace, until the Gods are tired of blood
                                                    > and create
                                                    > > a race that can understand." - George Bernard Shaw, "Caesar and
                                                    > Cleopatra"
                                                    > >
                                                    >
                                                  • Carl Williams
                                                    Jay, I note you say we quite a bit, and indeed, at least some of what has been stated here is echoed at Wikipedia [no doubt Huddleston noticed this]. There
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , May 8, 2007
                                                    • 0 Attachment
                                                      Jay, I note you say "we" quite a bit, and indeed, at least some of
                                                      what has been stated here is echoed at Wikipedia [no doubt Huddleston
                                                      noticed this]. There is a scolding banner at Wikipedia that heads the
                                                      section "Anderson's death" which seems to be suggesting some writers
                                                      dial up the quality of the submissions. The words "Please improve it"
                                                      in that banner would have me concerned if I was involved.

                                                      The words "One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the Bloody
                                                      Bill Anderson story has been presented" definitely sound a bit
                                                      familiar. I suspect, for instance, the ombudsmen-types [whatever they
                                                      are called] that police at Wikipedia have noted that the facts are
                                                      presented in the first person for an article that is anonymous. Just
                                                      some signs that things are not up to snuff. Is this written by thee or
                                                      thine indeed?

                                                      I might have to sign up at Wikipedia, something that I have avoided up
                                                      till now.

                                                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloody_Bill

                                                      Carl


                                                      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@...>
                                                      wrote:
                                                      >
                                                      > Hi Bob. As I stated in my post, I located more than a dozen such
                                                      > contradictions as to the number and location of the bullet wounds.
                                                      > My original message dealt only with this specific part, the gunshots,
                                                      > of the traditionalist stories about the ambush and its aftermath. I
                                                      > have read most of the books you mention and the researchers helping
                                                      > me have gone over all of these other points fully and thoroughly and
                                                      > are still actively working on them. Since my time is very limited,
                                                      > by my investigation into Bloody Bill Anderson, I am of course unable
                                                      > to present every detail of our findings on other boards but I assure
                                                      > you we have conducted the most thorough investigation into the life
                                                      > and death of Bloody Bill Anderson that has ever been conducted and we
                                                      > are far from finished.
                                                      > Thank you,
                                                      > ~Jay~
                                                    • Jay Longley
                                                      I did post the facts on Wikipedia about the gunshot theories, with all of my sources, and also corrected some blatant errors in other parts of the article like
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , May 9, 2007
                                                      • 0 Attachment
                                                        I did post the facts on Wikipedia about the gunshot theories, with
                                                        all of my sources, and also corrected some blatant errors in other
                                                        parts of the article like where the previous "editor" had incorrectly
                                                        stated that Bloody Bill Anderson married Bush Smith in 1862. Anyone
                                                        who knows anything about Bill Anderson knows he married Bush Smith
                                                        during the winter of 1863/1864 although there is a little dispute
                                                        about the exact day of the marriage. If the "police at Wikipedia",
                                                        as you laughably refer to them, are concerned with any part of my
                                                        message then they can easily remove it or edit out the portions which
                                                        are mostly direct quotes attributed to the specific authors. Since
                                                        I don't know if the staff was directing their criticism of my
                                                        information or previous ones who recently filled the page with
                                                        inaccuracies, I am not "concerned" in the least.
                                                        By "we", I am referring to the other 75 or so people who are
                                                        participating in our investigation as well as to the family members
                                                        of Colonel William C. Anderson. Despite how you and our other
                                                        critics want to portray our investigation, it is not a "one-man
                                                        crusade" but rather a concerted effort to learn and share the truth
                                                        about Bloody Bill Anderson.
                                                        Thank you for your "concern".
                                                        ~Jay~




                                                        --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
                                                        wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > Jay, I note you say "we" quite a bit, and indeed, at least some of
                                                        > what has been stated here is echoed at Wikipedia [no doubt
                                                        Huddleston
                                                        > noticed this]. There is a scolding banner at Wikipedia that heads
                                                        the
                                                        > section "Anderson's death" which seems to be suggesting some writers
                                                        > dial up the quality of the submissions. The words "Please improve
                                                        it"
                                                        > in that banner would have me concerned if I was involved.
                                                        >
                                                        > The words "One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the
                                                        Bloody
                                                        > Bill Anderson story has been presented" definitely sound a bit
                                                        > familiar. I suspect, for instance, the ombudsmen-types [whatever
                                                        they
                                                        > are called] that police at Wikipedia have noted that the facts are
                                                        > presented in the first person for an article that is anonymous. Just
                                                        > some signs that things are not up to snuff. Is this written by thee
                                                        or
                                                        > thine indeed?
                                                        >
                                                        > I might have to sign up at Wikipedia, something that I have avoided
                                                        up
                                                        > till now.
                                                        >
                                                        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloody_Bill
                                                        >
                                                        > Carl
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@>
                                                        > wrote:
                                                        > >
                                                        > > Hi Bob. As I stated in my post, I located more than a dozen such
                                                        > > contradictions as to the number and location of the bullet
                                                        wounds.
                                                        > > My original message dealt only with this specific part, the
                                                        gunshots,
                                                        > > of the traditionalist stories about the ambush and its
                                                        aftermath. I
                                                        > > have read most of the books you mention and the researchers
                                                        helping
                                                        > > me have gone over all of these other points fully and thoroughly
                                                        and
                                                        > > are still actively working on them. Since my time is very
                                                        limited,
                                                        > > by my investigation into Bloody Bill Anderson, I am of course
                                                        unable
                                                        > > to present every detail of our findings on other boards but I
                                                        assure
                                                        > > you we have conducted the most thorough investigation into the
                                                        life
                                                        > > and death of Bloody Bill Anderson that has ever been conducted
                                                        and we
                                                        > > are far from finished.
                                                        > > Thank you,
                                                        > > ~Jay~
                                                        >
                                                      • Carl Williams
                                                        I was making some effort not to make any criticism not personal and apologize if it came off that way. But if I were you, I would get ready for slings and
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , May 9, 2007
                                                        • 0 Attachment
                                                          I was making some effort not to make any criticism 'not personal' and
                                                          apologize if it came off that way. But if I were you, I would get
                                                          ready for slings and arrows... chinks in your armor, well, they might
                                                          as well point be pointed out. That doesnt mean you can't be right.



                                                          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@...>
                                                          wrote:
                                                          >
                                                          > I did post the facts on Wikipedia about the gunshot theories, with
                                                          > all of my sources, and also corrected some blatant errors in other
                                                          > parts of the article like where the previous "editor" had incorrectly
                                                          > stated that Bloody Bill Anderson married Bush Smith in 1862. Anyone
                                                          > who knows anything about Bill Anderson knows he married Bush Smith
                                                          > during the winter of 1863/1864 although there is a little dispute
                                                          > about the exact day of the marriage. If the "police at Wikipedia",
                                                          > as you laughably refer to them, are concerned with any part of my
                                                          > message then they can easily remove it or edit out the portions which
                                                          > are mostly direct quotes attributed to the specific authors. Since
                                                          > I don't know if the staff was directing their criticism of my
                                                          > information or previous ones who recently filled the page with
                                                          > inaccuracies, I am not "concerned" in the least.
                                                          > By "we", I am referring to the other 75 or so people who are
                                                          > participating in our investigation as well as to the family members
                                                          > of Colonel William C. Anderson. Despite how you and our other
                                                          > critics want to portray our investigation, it is not a "one-man
                                                          > crusade" but rather a concerted effort to learn and share the truth
                                                          > about Bloody Bill Anderson.
                                                          > Thank you for your "concern".
                                                          > ~Jay~
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@>
                                                          > wrote:
                                                          > >
                                                          > > Jay, I note you say "we" quite a bit, and indeed, at least some of
                                                          > > what has been stated here is echoed at Wikipedia [no doubt
                                                          > Huddleston
                                                          > > noticed this]. There is a scolding banner at Wikipedia that heads
                                                          > the
                                                          > > section "Anderson's death" which seems to be suggesting some writers
                                                          > > dial up the quality of the submissions. The words "Please improve
                                                          > it"
                                                          > > in that banner would have me concerned if I was involved.
                                                          > >
                                                          > > The words "One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the
                                                          > Bloody
                                                          > > Bill Anderson story has been presented" definitely sound a bit
                                                          > > familiar. I suspect, for instance, the ombudsmen-types [whatever
                                                          > they
                                                          > > are called] that police at Wikipedia have noted that the facts are
                                                          > > presented in the first person for an article that is anonymous. Just
                                                          > > some signs that things are not up to snuff. Is this written by thee
                                                          > or
                                                          > > thine indeed?
                                                          > >
                                                          > > I might have to sign up at Wikipedia, something that I have avoided
                                                          > up
                                                          > > till now.
                                                          > >
                                                          > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloody_Bill
                                                          > >
                                                          > > Carl
                                                          > >
                                                          > >
                                                          > > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@>
                                                          > > wrote:
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > Hi Bob. As I stated in my post, I located more than a dozen such
                                                          > > > contradictions as to the number and location of the bullet
                                                          > wounds.
                                                          > > > My original message dealt only with this specific part, the
                                                          > gunshots,
                                                          > > > of the traditionalist stories about the ambush and its
                                                          > aftermath. I
                                                          > > > have read most of the books you mention and the researchers
                                                          > helping
                                                          > > > me have gone over all of these other points fully and thoroughly
                                                          > and
                                                          > > > are still actively working on them. Since my time is very
                                                          > limited,
                                                          > > > by my investigation into Bloody Bill Anderson, I am of course
                                                          > unable
                                                          > > > to present every detail of our findings on other boards but I
                                                          > assure
                                                          > > > you we have conducted the most thorough investigation into the
                                                          > life
                                                          > > > and death of Bloody Bill Anderson that has ever been conducted
                                                          > and we
                                                          > > > are far from finished.
                                                          > > > Thank you,
                                                          > > > ~Jay~
                                                          > >
                                                          >
                                                        • Jay Longley
                                                          Hi Carl. Thank you for explaining this to me. Your suggestion to watch out for slings and arrouws is well taken. During this past year, I have indeed been
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , May 12, 2007
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                                                            Hi Carl. Thank you for explaining this to me. Your suggestion to
                                                            watch out for "slings and arrouws" is well taken. During this past
                                                            year, I have indeed been the receiver of more slander and liable that
                                                            I ever would have thought possible for simply stating the results of
                                                            our work to the public. I sincerely apologize to you, Carl, for
                                                            being defensive in regard to your message. It has become a habit, I
                                                            am afraid after receiving countless personal attacks, for me to be on
                                                            pins and needles waiting for the next knife blade to sink in. :)
                                                            Thanks again,
                                                            ~Jay~




                                                            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
                                                            wrote:
                                                            >
                                                            > I was making some effort not to make any criticism 'not personal'
                                                            and
                                                            > apologize if it came off that way. But if I were you, I would get
                                                            > ready for slings and arrows... chinks in your armor, well, they
                                                            might
                                                            > as well point be pointed out. That doesnt mean you can't be right.
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley" <jay_longley@>
                                                            > wrote:
                                                            > >
                                                            > > I did post the facts on Wikipedia about the gunshot theories,
                                                            with
                                                            > > all of my sources, and also corrected some blatant errors in
                                                            other
                                                            > > parts of the article like where the previous "editor" had
                                                            incorrectly
                                                            > > stated that Bloody Bill Anderson married Bush Smith in 1862.
                                                            Anyone
                                                            > > who knows anything about Bill Anderson knows he married Bush
                                                            Smith
                                                            > > during the winter of 1863/1864 although there is a little dispute
                                                            > > about the exact day of the marriage. If the "police at
                                                            Wikipedia",
                                                            > > as you laughably refer to them, are concerned with any part of my
                                                            > > message then they can easily remove it or edit out the portions
                                                            which
                                                            > > are mostly direct quotes attributed to the specific authors.
                                                            Since
                                                            > > I don't know if the staff was directing their criticism of my
                                                            > > information or previous ones who recently filled the page with
                                                            > > inaccuracies, I am not "concerned" in the least.
                                                            > > By "we", I am referring to the other 75 or so people who are
                                                            > > participating in our investigation as well as to the family
                                                            members
                                                            > > of Colonel William C. Anderson. Despite how you and our other
                                                            > > critics want to portray our investigation, it is not a "one-man
                                                            > > crusade" but rather a concerted effort to learn and share the
                                                            truth
                                                            > > about Bloody Bill Anderson.
                                                            > > Thank you for your "concern".
                                                            > > ~Jay~
                                                            > >
                                                            > >
                                                            > >
                                                            > >
                                                            > > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@>
                                                            > > wrote:
                                                            > > >
                                                            > > > Jay, I note you say "we" quite a bit, and indeed, at least some
                                                            of
                                                            > > > what has been stated here is echoed at Wikipedia [no doubt
                                                            > > Huddleston
                                                            > > > noticed this]. There is a scolding banner at Wikipedia that
                                                            heads
                                                            > > the
                                                            > > > section "Anderson's death" which seems to be suggesting some
                                                            writers
                                                            > > > dial up the quality of the submissions. The words "Please
                                                            improve
                                                            > > it"
                                                            > > > in that banner would have me concerned if I was involved.
                                                            > > >
                                                            > > > The words "One of the most disturbing aspects about the way the
                                                            > > Bloody
                                                            > > > Bill Anderson story has been presented" definitely sound a bit
                                                            > > > familiar. I suspect, for instance, the ombudsmen-types
                                                            [whatever
                                                            > > they
                                                            > > > are called] that police at Wikipedia have noted that the facts
                                                            are
                                                            > > > presented in the first person for an article that is anonymous.
                                                            Just
                                                            > > > some signs that things are not up to snuff. Is this written by
                                                            thee
                                                            > > or
                                                            > > > thine indeed?
                                                            > > >
                                                            > > > I might have to sign up at Wikipedia, something that I have
                                                            avoided
                                                            > > up
                                                            > > > till now.
                                                            > > >
                                                            > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloody_Bill
                                                            > > >
                                                            > > > Carl
                                                            > > >
                                                            > > >
                                                            > > > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Jay Longley"
                                                            <jay_longley@>
                                                            > > > wrote:
                                                            > > > >
                                                            > > > > Hi Bob. As I stated in my post, I located more than a dozen
                                                            such
                                                            > > > > contradictions as to the number and location of the bullet
                                                            > > wounds.
                                                            > > > > My original message dealt only with this specific part, the
                                                            > > gunshots,
                                                            > > > > of the traditionalist stories about the ambush and its
                                                            > > aftermath. I
                                                            > > > > have read most of the books you mention and the researchers
                                                            > > helping
                                                            > > > > me have gone over all of these other points fully and
                                                            thoroughly
                                                            > > and
                                                            > > > > are still actively working on them. Since my time is very
                                                            > > limited,
                                                            > > > > by my investigation into Bloody Bill Anderson, I am of course
                                                            > > unable
                                                            > > > > to present every detail of our findings on other boards but I
                                                            > > assure
                                                            > > > > you we have conducted the most thorough investigation into
                                                            the
                                                            > > life
                                                            > > > > and death of Bloody Bill Anderson that has ever been
                                                            conducted
                                                            > > and we
                                                            > > > > are far from finished.
                                                            > > > > Thank you,
                                                            > > > > ~Jay~
                                                            > > >
                                                            > >
                                                            >
                                                          • Carl Williams
                                                            just thought I d put this out there for anyone interested, an article about someone debunking a Booth conspiracy theory note that after seven days the article
                                                            Message 29 of 29 , May 25, 2007
                                                            • 0 Attachment
                                                              just thought I'd put this out there for anyone interested, an article
                                                              about someone debunking a Booth conspiracy theory

                                                              note that after seven days the article is not available without a
                                                              subscription [but good at the moment]

                                                              http://tinyurl.com/34st2w
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