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Re: Our Famous People

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  • gnrljejohnston
    ... of Soldier ... Harry, you forgot his Second Bishop of Tennessee: Bishop Quintard JEJ
    Message 1 of 15 , Jan 4, 2007
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Harry Smeltzer" <hjs21@...> wrote:
      >
      > You mean you're NOT the dashing Chattanooga barrister and author
      of "Soldier
      > of Tennessee"?
      >
      > POSER!!!!!!
      >
      > Harry

      >
      Harry, you forgot his "Second Bishop of Tennessee: Bishop Quintard"

      JEJ
    • Art Bagley
      You western theater folks can probably help me in understanding Sherman s approach to Atlanta better than any other group of folks. Why weren t the lessons he
      Message 2 of 15 , Jan 31, 2007
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        You western theater folks can probably help me in understanding
        Sherman's approach to Atlanta better than any other group of folks.
        Why weren't the lessons he learned and applied at Rocky Face Ridge,
        Buzzards Roost, and Dug Gap employed at Kennesaw Mountain? Just
        playing the odds that a change in tactics would fool the Rebels?

        Also, I've been to the Dug Gap site and can understand the
        difficulties attacking troops would encounter. By any chance has Dug
        Gap been cleaned up in the last 4 years? Any added interpretive
        markers, plaques, etc.? I enjoyed seeing Joe Johnston's statue in
        downtown Dalton, too.

        ArtorBart33624
        Tampa, FL
      • keeno2@aol.com
        In a message dated 1/31/2007 8:17:31 PM Central Standard Time, abagley@ut.edu writes: Why weren t the lessons he learned and applied at Rocky Face Ridge,
        Message 3 of 15 , Jan 31, 2007
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          In a message dated 1/31/2007 8:17:31 PM Central Standard Time, abagley@... writes:
          Why weren't the lessons he learned and applied at Rocky Face Ridge,
          Buzzards Roost, and Dug Gap employed at Kennesaw Mountain?
          My guess is that he was impatient to get to Atlanta, made a dumb mistake, and then returned to his proven technique.
          Ken
        • LWhite64@aol.com
          Well one thing to remember is that he didnt launch a full out attack on Big Kennesaw, it was mainly against Cheatham Hill, which although tough is nothing like
          Message 4 of 15 , Feb 1 4:10 AM
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            Well one thing to remember is that he didnt launch a full out attack on Big Kennesaw, it was mainly against Cheatham Hill, which although tough is nothing like the heighths at Buzzard Roost.
             
            Lee
          • gnrljejohnston
            ... I enjoyed seeing Joe Johnston s statue in ... From what I understand, it is the only statue of JEJ JEJ Sun City Center, FL
            Message 5 of 15 , Feb 1 12:49 PM
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              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Art Bagley" <abagley@...> wrote:
              >
              I enjoyed seeing Joe Johnston's statue in
              > downtown Dalton, too.
              >
              > ArtorBart33624
              > Tampa, FL
              >
              From what I understand, it is the only statue of JEJ

              JEJ
              Sun City Center, FL
            • gnrljejohnston
              ... Dug ... Art, This site might help give you more info on Kennesaw http://ngeorgia.com/history/kennesaw.html also this site
              Message 6 of 15 , Feb 1 1:03 PM
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                --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Art Bagley" <abagley@...> wrote:
                >
                > You western theater folks can probably help me in understanding
                > Sherman's approach to Atlanta better than any other group of folks.
                > Why weren't the lessons he learned and applied at Rocky Face Ridge,
                > Buzzards Roost, and Dug Gap employed at Kennesaw Mountain? Just
                > playing the odds that a change in tactics would fool the Rebels?
                >
                > Also, I've been to the Dug Gap site and can understand the
                > difficulties attacking troops would encounter. By any chance has
                Dug
                > Gap been cleaned up in the last 4 years? Any added interpretive
                > markers, plaques, etc.? I enjoyed seeing Joe Johnston's statue in
                > downtown Dalton, too.
                >
                > ArtorBart33624
                > Tampa, FL
                >
                Art,
                This site might help give you more info on Kennesaw
                http://ngeorgia.com/history/kennesaw.html also this site
                http://ngeorgia.com/history/kolbsfarm.html

                JEJ
              • Dave Gorski
                ... My understanding is that Sherman was concerned about his supply and communication line, both connected to the RR line. As the Union force drew closer to
                Message 7 of 15 , Feb 1 3:18 PM
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                  >Why weren't the lessons he learned and applied at Rocky Face Ridge,
                  >Buzzards Roost, and Dug Gap employed at Kennesaw Mountain? Just
                  >playing the odds that a change in tactics would fool the Rebels?

                  My understanding is that Sherman was concerned about his supply and
                  communication line, both connected to the RR line. As the Union force
                  drew closer to Atlanta, guerrilla activity against them increase. Continued
                  flanking movements to the right would have taken Schofield more than a
                  mile further south, and in Shermans view, would have been met with a
                  Confederate countermove that would take them even further from the
                  lines of supply and communications. Sherman also felt that a flanking
                  move was expected, and that by attacking, he had the element of
                  surprise.
                  The Confederate line was stretched somewhat thin in his mind, over 8
                  miles, and Sherman thought he could break the line. Demonstrations were
                  made on both ends of the Confederate line, but no move was made by the
                  Confederates to shift troops and weaken the line, as Sherman had hoped.

                  Regards, Dave Gorski
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