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Re: Railroads

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  • gnrljejohnston
    ... situation became clear,... Railroads surely were going to have to toe the line of the military that was in power. In the case of the AOT, permission had to
    Message 1 of 56 , Dec 8, 2006
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      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Carl Williams" <carlw4514@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Control seemed to follow control by the military. As the military
      situation became clear,... Railroads surely were going to have to toe
      the line of the military that was in power.

      In the case of the AOT, permission had to be obtained from Jeff Davis
      before trains could be released. Case in point were the conditions
      that Johnston had in January and February of 1864. JEJ complained to
      Governor Joseph E. Brown of Georgia, that the Western and Atlantic
      railroad was not carrying the necessary amount of supplies that his
      army needed. He also wrote to L.B. Northrop, the Commissary General
      about this problem, in addition to A.R. Lawton, the Confederacy
      Quartermaster General. All three denied that the conditions that
      Johnston complained about existed. Brown insisted that Johnston was
      misinformed and that the railroad was sending a sufficient amount of
      trains and supplies to Johnston. Northrop claimed that Johnston
      exhibited "a heedless disregard of the facts of the case," and blamed
      Johnston for the shortages if there were any. Lawton stated that
      Johnston's army was "better served than any other in the
      Confederacy." This result should have been realized since both
      Northrop and Lawton were friends and puppets of Davis. Brown on the
      other hand, who also had his disagreements and had friction with
      Davis, basically took the word of supervisor of the railroad.

      Despite these biased replies, Johnston was determined to get his army
      supplied. In the latter part of January and the beginning of
      February, the supply of food was a most serious concern to the
      commander. Economic inflation also added fuel to the situation since
      the cost of food was so great that officers, who were not eligible to
      draw rations by law, could not afford to feed themselves. The
      officers of one division even petitioned the government to change the
      law in order that they could have rations. Johnston finally wrote
      Davis, that unless the supply problem was improved and something was
      done to allow officers to receive rations, he would have to have his
      army withdraw from their present position. Then and only then, did
      Davis relent and allowed the railroad to properly serve Johnston.
    • keeno2@aol.com
      A most interesting discussion, gentlemen. I d always wondered how that seniority/rank thing worked out, but not enough to actually go looking for it. As it
      Message 56 of 56 , Dec 20, 2006
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        A most interesting discussion, gentlemen. I'd always wondered how that seniority/rank thing worked out, but not enough to actually go looking for it. As it turns out, it was provided to me. Thank you all.
        Ken
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