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Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Chickamauga by Turchin

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  • keeno2@aol.com
    In a message dated 11/2/2006 9:51:23 PM Central Standard Time, GnrlJEJohnston@aol.com writes: She is the one that got the Perryville NPS Supt. give me a
    Message 1 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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      In a message dated 11/2/2006 9:51:23 PM Central Standard Time, GnrlJEJohnston@... writes:
      She is the one that got the Perryville NPS Supt. give me a personal tour of the battlefield.
      Thank you evermuch General, but no one has yet given me the town near or in which this village can be found. I'd very much like to stop at a real Shaker community on the way to something more focal. It would be a curiousity like the Oneida Community or the Amana Colonies or the Amish communities that dot the sweeping farmland of the great plains. (I recall some Hutterites somewhere north of where I grew up.) Of some historical but little personal interest. A blip in the road. These people were a thread in the tapesty. Good, decent, God-fearing. (Hate that word: God-fearing.) But a fundamental piece of the republic. "You can do as you wish, believe what you want, worship as you will, and if you can bring up a wagon of shelled corn, we will buy it." God bless America.
      OK. I'm waxing stupid.'
      Ken
    • keeno2@aol.com
      Mr. Dorr. Respect, sir. Kentucky seems to have figured out that it wasn t going to get federal recognition and simply set out on its own to preserve the sites.
      Message 2 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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        Mr. Dorr. Respect, sir. Kentucky seems to have figured out that it wasn't going to get federal recognition and simply set out on its own to preserve the sites. So it may have been with a left-eye toward tourist revenue, its lean toward CW sites deserves kudos. They've done a fantastic job on sites ignored by the NPS. Bless Kentucky! Does "God Bless Kentucky" fit in the lyrics?
        Ken
      • gnrljejohnston
        ... location of this Shaker Village. Ken. Ken, Shaker Village is in Pleasant Hill which is close to Bardstown. Go to the URL for accurate info.
        Message 3 of 27 , Nov 3, 2006
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          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
          >
          >
          > Excellent advice, honored lurker, but missing in your post is the
          location of this Shaker Village. Ken.

          Ken, Shaker Village is in Pleasant Hill which is close to Bardstown.

          Go to the URL for accurate info. www.shakervillageky.org/

          JEJ
          >
        • gnrljejohnston
          ... or in ... Shaker ... Ken, Shaker Village is in Pleasant Hill which is near Harrodsburg. Just a short drive from either Lexington, Richmond, or Perryville.
          Message 4 of 27 , Nov 3, 2006
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            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
            >
            > Thank you evermuch General, but no one has yet given me the town near
            or in
            > which this village can be found. I'd very much like to stop at a real
            Shaker
            > community on the way to something more focal. > Ken

            Ken, Shaker Village is in Pleasant Hill which is near Harrodsburg.
            Just a short drive from either Lexington, Richmond, or Perryville.

            JEJ
            >
          • mobile_96
            ...
            Message 5 of 27 , Nov 3, 2006
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              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
              < They've done a fantastic job on sites ignored by
              the NPS. Bless Kentucky! Does "God Bless Kentucky" fit in the lyrics?
              Ken.>
              And don't forget to visit Merchant's Row in Perryville.
              Last I heard they were still working on turning as much of it as
              possible into a Living History village. In '03 they were working on the
              Dr's Office and home. A short distance north of town is Bragg's HQ.When
              there last, the building had residents, but I understand they were in
              the process of getting them out, so they could get it restored and
              opened. You can also take the winding drive (off the main road just a
              bit south of the house) down behind the house, to the location of the
              only still operating spring in the area. The spring is not visited
              often, as I have to get out and move branches from the road before
              proceeding down.
              There are a few soldiers, from the battle, buried in the town cemetery.
              Even without the battle held nearby, the town has a interesting early
              history.
              Chuck
            • gnrljejohnston
              ... lyrics? ... the ... HQ.When ... in ... a ... the ... cemetery. ... early ... Also, you can take the road West out of Perryville, go to the end and turn
              Message 6 of 27 , Nov 3, 2006
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                --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "mobile_96" <mobile_96@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@ wrote:
                > < They've done a fantastic job on sites ignored by
                > the NPS. Bless Kentucky! Does "God Bless Kentucky" fit in the
                lyrics?
                > Ken.>
                > And don't forget to visit Merchant's Row in Perryville.
                > Last I heard they were still working on turning as much of it as
                > possible into a Living History village. In '03 they were working on
                the
                > Dr's Office and home. A short distance north of town is Bragg's
                HQ.When
                > there last, the building had residents, but I understand they were
                in
                > the process of getting them out, so they could get it restored and
                > opened. You can also take the winding drive (off the main road just
                a
                > bit south of the house) down behind the house, to the location of
                the
                > only still operating spring in the area. The spring is not visited
                > often, as I have to get out and move branches from the road before
                > proceeding down.
                > There are a few soldiers, from the battle, buried in the town
                cemetery.
                > Even without the battle held nearby, the town has a interesting
                early
                > history.
                > Chuck

                Also, you can take the road West out of Perryville, go to the end and
                turn right and it will loop back to the road you were on out of
                Perryville, but heading East. This little loop is quite interesting
                for there are several markers there, including where the first
                encounter of Confederate troops with Sheridan's troops, thus
                beginning the battle of Perryville. I believe I posted pix of this
                area on the website.

                JEJ
                >
              • pete@blueone.net
                Shakertown is on Hwy 68 southwest of Lexington and northeast of Harrodsburg. From Lexington, look for Hwy 68 (Harrodsburg Road) on the southwest side of the
                Message 7 of 27 , Nov 4, 2006
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                  Shakertown is on Hwy 68 southwest of Lexington and northeast of Harrodsburg. From Lexington, look
                  for Hwy 68 (Harrodsburg Road) on the southwest side of the city.
                  If in Frankfort, take 127 south to Danville and then go northeast to Shakertown.
                  Signs to Perryville in Danville and Harrodsburg abound--you'll have no problem getting to P'ville
                  form either location.



                  ------- Original Message -------
                  From : keeno2@...[mailto:keeno2@...]
                  Sent : 11/2/2006 11:06:55 PM
                  To : civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                  Cc :
                  Subject : RE: Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Chickamauga by Turchin

                  In a message dated 11/2/2006 9:35:24 PM Central Standard Time,
                  pete@... writes:
                  If a lurker can throw in a comment, Shaker Village is very worthwhile. If
                  you have time, eat a meal there and you'll enjoy food as never
                  before--everything grown or raised on the site or a nearby farm. But to eat genly requires a
                  reservation a few days in advance. Pete Cohron
                  Excellent advice, honored lurker, but missing in your post is the location of
                  this Shaker Village. Up this way we have the Amish. And if you want meat and
                  pototoes to die for, slide over to one of their communities. I'm guessing the
                  Amish and the Shakers have absolutely nothing in common except for a
                  bottom-line appreciation for good food and plenty of it. We're certainly not going to
                  find a dish of tossed greens lightly sprinkled with balsamic vinegar and olive
                  oil with a scattering of garlic-touched croutons.

                  Will note your response and mark my calendar with indelible ink. Thanks in
                  advance,
                  Ken.
                • nickrelee@aol.com
                  As posted earlier I may have found a copy of Chickamauga by Turchin that was owned by Rosecrans. I looked thru the entire book and found only 4 pages where
                  Message 8 of 27 , Nov 7, 2006
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                    As posted earlier I may have found a copy of Chickamauga by Turchin that was owned by Rosecrans.  I looked thru the entire book and found only 4 pages where notes were made.  I just posted these scans onto the photo page on the group's homepage.  Its in a folder called "Pages from Chickamauga by Turchin"
                     
                    The notes are pretty limited.  I didn't find anything that really confirmed that it was Rosy's book.  Online I found a place selling a letter of his which you can view at:
                    It appears to me that the handwriting is similar, but the two samples are small so a professional handwriting analyst probably couldn't say anything for sure.  But go ahead and look at the two samples and see what you think.  At first glance I'd say that the known letter doesn't destroy the possibility that the book was Rosy's. 
                    --Nick
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