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Re: [civilwarwest] Chickamauga by Turchin

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  • DPowell334@AOL.COM
    In a message dated 10/31/2006 9:20:26 P.M. Central Standard Time, nickrelee@aol.com writes: I just received Turchin s book on Chickamauga thru inter library
    Message 1 of 27 , Nov 1, 2006
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      In a message dated 10/31/2006 9:20:26 P.M. Central Standard Time, nickrelee@... writes:
      I just received Turchin's book on Chickamauga thru inter library loan.  Inside the front cover there is a typed note pasted that this copy originally belonged to General Rosecrans.  I flipped thru the book and in the margains there are places where someone has written "this is a mistake" and one note even says "our" lines.  What do you suppose are the odds that these notes are from Rosecrans or some prankster?  Anyone have a copy of Rosy's handwritting to base these notes against?  This might be an incredible find or a pretty involved prank.  Unfortunately the large foldout maps that originally accompanied the book are gone, I really wanted to make copies of those but I guess that's not gonna happen.  But if this was Rosy's copy then I'll definetly make copies of his notes.
      --Nick
       
      That would be pretty amazing if it were. I don't have a lot of handwritten stuff from Rosey, but his papers are at UCLA. They could help, maybe.
       
      I once received a copy of Col. Hiram Devol's memoir (of the 36th Ohio) in the same manner, and low and behold, it once belonged to the regimental historian of the 36th, who similarly appended notes. He corroborated Devol's more controversial claims (specifically about JJ Reynolds losing his head at Chickamauga) and suggested alternate locations. The notes transformed it from a rare memoir to a unique primary source.
       
      Any chance you would be willing to share "Rosey's" notes with me? In return, I will see if I can track down the maps.
       
      Dave Powell
    • Kevin & Judy Coy
      I think you should share with all of us. :) Kevin S. Coy ... From: nickrelee@aol.com To: civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2006 10:19
      Message 2 of 27 , Nov 1, 2006
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        I think you should share with all of us.   :)
         
        Kevin S. Coy
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2006 10:19 PM
        Subject: [civilwarwest] Chickamauga by Turchin

        I just received Turchin's book on Chickamauga thru inter library loan.  Inside the front cover there is a typed note pasted that this copy originally belonged to General Rosecrans.  I flipped thru the book and in the margains there are places where someone has written "this is a mistake" and one note even says "our" lines.  What do you suppose are the odds that these notes are from Rosecrans or some prankster?  Anyone have a copy of Rosy's handwritting to base these notes against?  This might be an incredible find or a pretty involved prank.  Unfortunately the large foldout maps that originally accompanied the book are gone, I really wanted to make copies of those but I guess that's not gonna happen.  But if this was Rosy's copy then I'll definetly make copies of his notes.
        --Nick

      • nickrelee@aol.com
        My local library has a copy of Ohio at Shiloh, no big deal, but the previous owner was a vet of the battle and he wrote 2-3 pages of recollections, pretty
        Message 3 of 27 , Nov 1, 2006
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          My local library has a copy of Ohio at Shiloh, no big deal, but the previous owner was a vet of the battle and he wrote 2-3 pages of recollections, pretty neat. 
           
          I guess I'll scan the pages and post them online so all can see.  From my first skim it doesn't appear that Rosey wrote much, just a few notes every so often, primarily on second day stuff.  Will take me a few days to get around to scanning as I just got back from a week+ of touring (Chattanooga, Chickamauga and Perryville). 
           
          Now to check UCLA to see if I can get a handwritting sample.
          --Nick
           
          In a message dated 11/1/2006 5:51:35 AM Mountain Standard Time, DPowell334@... writes:
          I once received a copy of Col. Hiram Devol's memoir (of the 36th Ohio) in the same manner, and low and behold, it once belonged to the regimental historian of the 36th, who similarly appended notes. He corroborated Devol's more controversial claims (specifically about JJ Reynolds losing his head at Chickamauga) and suggested alternate locations. The notes transformed it from a rare memoir to a unique primary source.
           
          Any chance you would be willing to share "Rosey's" notes with me? In return, I will see if I can track down the maps.
           
          Dave Powell
           
        • SDE80@aol.com
          In a message dated 11/1/2006 3:25:01 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... I can confirm Nick was at Chattanooga, as we were in a group that visited the Wauhatchie
          Message 4 of 27 , Nov 1, 2006
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            In a message dated 11/1/2006 3:25:01 PM Eastern Standard Time, nickrelee@... writes:

            Will take me a few days to get around to scanning as I just got back from a week+ of touring (Chattanooga, Chickamauga and Perryville). 



            I can confirm Nick was at Chattanooga, as we were in a group that visited the Wauhatchie sites last week.  

            Sam Elliott
          • nickrelee@aol.com
            A great time that was. I had never been on Tyndale Hill. I had previously visited Smith Hill but had not ventured down that road to get the better view of
            Message 5 of 27 , Nov 1, 2006
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              A great time that was.  I had never been on Tyndale Hill.  I had previously visited Smith Hill but had not ventured down that road to get the better view of Lookout Mtn.
               
              And Perryville is a true gem, just hope we can preserve more before times runs out there too.  We have a head start there, just need to keep going.
              --Nick
               
              In a message dated 11/1/2006 3:57:31 PM Mountain Standard Time, SDE80@... writes:
              I can confirm Nick was at Chattanooga, as we were in a group that visited the Wauhatchie sites last week.  

              Sam Elliott
               
            • hank9174
              It was 1984 when I last visited Perryville. At that time there were perhaps 8 stops using a mimeographed, type- written guide. How is it now? HankC ...
              Message 6 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                It was 1984 when I last visited Perryville.

                At that time there were perhaps 8 stops using a mimeographed, type-
                written guide.

                How is it now?


                HankC

                --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, nickrelee@... wrote:
                >
                >
                > A great time that was. I had never been on Tyndale Hill. I had
                previously
                > visited Smith Hill but had not ventured down that road to get the
                better view
                > of Lookout Mtn.
                >
                > And Perryville is a true gem, just hope we can preserve more before
                times
                > runs out there too. We have a head start there, just need to keep
                going.
                > --Nick
                >
                > In a message dated 11/1/2006 3:57:31 PM Mountain Standard Time,
                > SDE80@... writes:
                >
                > I can confirm Nick was at Chattanooga, as we were in a group that
                visited
                > the Wauhatchie sites last week.
                >
                > Sam Elliott
                >
              • keeno2@aol.com
                In a message dated 11/2/2006 8:38:34 AM Central Standard Time, clarkc@missouri.edu writes: At that time there were perhaps 8 stops using a mimeographed,
                Message 7 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                  In a message dated 11/2/2006 8:38:34 AM Central Standard Time, clarkc@... writes:
                  At that time there were perhaps 8 stops using a mimeographed, type-written guide.

                  How is it now?
                  Kentucky has put in a lot of effort since you were there, acquiring property, etc. It's very nice still improving daily. (I visited in '03.)
                  Ken
                • bjer50010
                  ... type-written ... property, ... I ll second that. I was there towards the middle of June of this year. I did post a couple of thoughts at the time but
                  Message 8 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                    --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
                    >
                    > In a message dated 11/2/2006 8:38:34 AM Central Standard Time,
                    > clarkc@... writes:
                    > At that time there were perhaps 8 stops using a mimeographed,
                    type-written
                    > guide.
                    >
                    > How is it now?
                    > Kentucky has put in a lot of effort since you were there, acquiring
                    property,
                    > etc. It's very nice still improving daily. (I visited in '03.)
                    > Ken
                    >

                    I'll second that. I was there towards the middle of June of this
                    year. I did post a couple of thoughts at the time but they appear to
                    have gotten lost in some of the strangeness occurring at that time.

                    As far as the battlefield goes, it is extremely well maintained. The
                    day I visited, there were several groundskeepers out and about, but
                    only a couple of other visitors. They have a map in the VC which
                    indicates the acquisitions of ground for the park. Amazing amount of
                    acquisition. They are now up to over 20 stops.

                    I was able to cover most of the field within about 2 hrs. of walking.
                    There are placards at each of the stops which are informative. I
                    also brought along the tour guide from the Perryville issue of Blue
                    and Grey.

                    I definitely recommend the park to anyone who is in the area.

                    JB Jewell
                  • keeno2@aol.com
                    In a message dated 11/2/2006 12:04:10 PM Central Standard Time, barry.jewell@yale.edu writes: I definitely recommend the park to anyone who is in the area. If
                    Message 9 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                      In a message dated 11/2/2006 12:04:10 PM Central Standard Time, barry.jewell@... writes:
                      I definitely recommend the park to anyone who is in the area. 
                      If your route allows, a stop at the museum and frontier village in Bardstown is also a definite worthwhile. An excellent museum.
                      Ken
                    • nickrelee@aol.com
                      As others have said, the park is very nice. About two dozen stops, almost all walking. So if you have a hard time walking around it would be a tough visit.
                      Message 10 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                        As others have said, the park is very nice.  About two dozen stops, almost all walking.  So if you have a hard time walking around it would be a tough visit.  From those stops you can see most of the action.  And the areas outside the park are not yet developed so you have good views of those areas and can really visualize the battle.  I got there early, about 3 hours before the VC opened, and was able to do nearly every stop by then.  The few I missed were the more distant spots and time was of the essence.  When the VC opened there was about 4-5 other tourists and 3 employees, which seemed pretty busy for a late Oct sunday. 
                        --Nick
                         
                        In a message dated 11/2/2006 7:38:34 AM Mountain Standard Time, clarkc@... writes:

                        It was 1984 when I last visited Perryville.

                        At that time there were perhaps 8 stops using a mimeographed, type-
                        written guide.

                        How is it now?
                         
                      • gnrljejohnston
                        ... to ... The ... of ... walking. ... While your that close to Richmond, KY (about twenty - thirty miles) it would pay to visit the sites of the battle of
                        Message 11 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                          --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "bjer50010" <barry.jewell@...>
                          wrote:
                          >

                          > I'll second that. I was there towards the middle of June of this
                          > year. I did post a couple of thoughts at the time but they appear
                          to
                          > have gotten lost in some of the strangeness occurring at that time.
                          >
                          > As far as the battlefield goes, it is extremely well maintained.
                          The
                          > day I visited, there were several groundskeepers out and about, but
                          > only a couple of other visitors. They have a map in the VC which
                          > indicates the acquisitions of ground for the park. Amazing amount
                          of
                          > acquisition. They are now up to over 20 stops.
                          >
                          > I was able to cover most of the field within about 2 hrs. of
                          walking.
                          > There are placards at each of the stops which are informative. I
                          > also brought along the tour guide from the Perryville issue of Blue
                          > and Grey.
                          >
                          > I definitely recommend the park to anyone who is in the area.
                          >
                          > JB Jewell

                          While your that close to Richmond, KY (about twenty - thirty miles)
                          it would pay to visit the sites of the battle of Richmond. They have
                          a driving tour guide that can be obtained at the Chamber of Commerce.
                          Do pay a visit to the cemetery that is on the south edge of town were
                          the Confederate dead were buried. I believe I posted some photos of
                          that cemetery and the church that served as a hospital. Plus,
                          everything is free :-)

                          JEJ
                          >
                        • gnrljejohnston
                          ... Bardstown ... Also nearby Shaker Village
                          Message 12 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
                            >
                            > In a message dated 11/2/2006 12:04:10 PM Central Standard Time,
                            > barry.jewell@... writes:
                            > I definitely recommend the park to anyone who is in the area.
                            > If your route allows, a stop at the museum and frontier village in
                            Bardstown
                            > is also a definite worthwhile. An excellent museum.
                            > Ken
                            >

                            Also nearby Shaker Village
                          • keeno2@aol.com
                            In a message dated 11/2/2006 8:01:45 PM Central Standard Time, GnrlJEJohnston@aol.com writes: Also nearby Shaker Village Of that I have know knowledge. Is it
                            Message 13 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                              In a message dated 11/2/2006 8:01:45 PM Central Standard Time, GnrlJEJohnston@... writes:
                              Also nearby Shaker Village
                              Of that I have know knowledge. Is it worth a stop in a pressed situation? With only so much time to cover thus and such an area? Where is it and what is its interest? Was unaware of a Shaker presence in the area. A strange group with strange ideas that guaranteed its demise -- much in the same vein as the King David group in Michigan. I'll definitely include it in the next trip that way if you'll recommend it.
                              Ken
                               
                              Ken
                            • pete@blueone.net
                              If a lurker can throw in a comment, Shaker Village is very worthwhile. If you have time, eat a meal there and you ll enjoy food as never before--everything
                              Message 14 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                                If a lurker can throw in a comment, Shaker Village is very worthwhile. If you have time, eat a
                                meal there and you'll enjoy food as never before--everything grown or raised on the site or a
                                nearby farm. But to eat genly requires a reservation a few days in advance
                                Pete Cohron
                                Lexington, KY



                                ------- Original Message -------
                                From : keeno2@...[mailto:keeno2@...]
                                Sent : 11/2/2006 10:14:33 PM
                                To : civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                Cc :
                                Subject : RE: Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Chickamauga by Turchin

                                In a message dated 11/2/2006 8:01:45 PM Central Standard Time,
                                GnrlJEJohnston@... writes:
                                Also nearby Shaker Village
                                Of that I have know knowledge. Is it worth a stop in a pressed situation?
                                With only so much time to cover thus and such an area? Where is it and what is
                                its interest? Was unaware of a Shaker presence in the area. A strange group with
                                strange ideas that guaranteed its demise -- much in the same vein as the King
                                David group in Michigan. I'll definitely include it in the next trip that way
                                if you'll recommend it.
                                Ken

                                Ken
                              • DORR64OVI@aol.com
                                In a message dated 11/2/2006 9:05:59 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, GnrlJEJohnston@aol.com writes: While your that close to Richmond, KY (about twenty - thirty
                                Message 15 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                                  In a message dated 11/2/2006 9:05:59 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, GnrlJEJohnston@... writes:
                                  While your that close to Richmond, KY (about twenty - thirty miles)
                                  it would pay to visit the sites of the battle of Richmond. They have
                                  a driving tour guide that can be obtained at the Chamber of Commerce.
                                  Do pay a visit to the cemetery that is on the south edge of town were
                                  the Confederate dead were buried. I believe I posted some photos of
                                  that cemetery and the church that served as a hospital. Plus,
                                  everything is free :-)

                                  JEJ
                                  General....after this years Perryville reenactment, myself and my messmate drove over to Richmond and took the driving tour of the Richmond battle.  It takes you all the way down to Big Hill and then you work your way back to Richmond.   Not a lot to see other than the church but the Battlefield Association has recently purchased more land and the beginnings of a park with a visitors center are there.   The potential for making another attraction like Perryville is obvious.  The cemetery was interesting as well.
                                         It appears that the state of KY and its areas have come to appreciate the benefits of tourists and their willingness to spend $ on things of historical interest.  Up the road from Richmond is also the recreated site of Boonsboro which was ok to tour.  The real gem here was that we learned about a recently accessed CW earthen fort over the river from Boonsboro.  If you are hearty enough to make the hike up to the top from the highway, it was worth the effort.
                                   
                                  Kent Dorr
                                • gnrljejohnston
                                  ... situation? ... and what is ... strange group with ... as the King ... trip that way ... Ken, Shaker Village is surely worth a stop. The Shakers that were
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                                    --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
                                    >
                                    > In a message dated 11/2/2006 8:01:45 PM Central Standard Time,
                                    > GnrlJEJohnston@... writes:
                                    > Also nearby Shaker Village
                                    > Of that I have know knowledge. Is it worth a stop in a pressed
                                    situation?
                                    > With only so much time to cover thus and such an area? Where is it
                                    and what is
                                    > its interest? Was unaware of a Shaker presence in the area. A
                                    strange group with
                                    > strange ideas that guaranteed its demise -- much in the same vein
                                    as the King
                                    > David group in Michigan. I'll definitely include it in the next
                                    trip that way
                                    > if you'll recommend it.
                                    > Ken
                                    >
                                    > Ken
                                    >

                                    Ken,
                                    Shaker Village is surely worth a stop. The Shakers that were there
                                    following the Battles of Richmond and Perryville served as nurses,
                                    orderlies, and took wounded into their homes, both Union and
                                    Confederate. One of the gals that helps run it (I forgot her name,
                                    but she use to be "Host Orphan" in AOL's Mason Dixon Room) and is one
                                    of the best sources of battles in that area. She is the one that got
                                    the Perryville NPS Supt. give me a personal tour of the battlefield.

                                    JEJ
                                  • keeno2@aol.com
                                    In a message dated 11/2/2006 9:35:24 PM Central Standard Time, pete@blueone.net writes: If a lurker can throw in a comment, Shaker Village is very worthwhile.
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                                      In a message dated 11/2/2006 9:35:24 PM Central Standard Time, pete@... writes:
                                      If a lurker can throw in a comment, Shaker Village is very worthwhile.  If you have time, eat a meal there and you'll enjoy food as never before--everything grown or raised on the site or a nearby farm.  But to eat genly requires a reservation a few days in advance. Pete Cohron
                                      Excellent advice, honored lurker, but missing in your post is the location of this Shaker Village. Up this way we have the Amish. And if you want meat and pototoes to die for, slide over to one of their communities. I'm guessing the Amish and the Shakers have absolutely nothing in common except for a bottom-line appreciation for good food and plenty of it. We're certainly not going to find a dish of tossed greens lightly sprinkled with balsamic vinegar and olive oil with a scattering of garlic-touched croutons.
                                       
                                      Will note your response and mark my calendar with indelible ink. Thanks in advance,
                                      Ken.
                                    • keeno2@aol.com
                                      In a message dated 11/2/2006 9:51:23 PM Central Standard Time, GnrlJEJohnston@aol.com writes: She is the one that got the Perryville NPS Supt. give me a
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                                        In a message dated 11/2/2006 9:51:23 PM Central Standard Time, GnrlJEJohnston@... writes:
                                        She is the one that got the Perryville NPS Supt. give me a personal tour of the battlefield.
                                        Thank you evermuch General, but no one has yet given me the town near or in which this village can be found. I'd very much like to stop at a real Shaker community on the way to something more focal. It would be a curiousity like the Oneida Community or the Amana Colonies or the Amish communities that dot the sweeping farmland of the great plains. (I recall some Hutterites somewhere north of where I grew up.) Of some historical but little personal interest. A blip in the road. These people were a thread in the tapesty. Good, decent, God-fearing. (Hate that word: God-fearing.) But a fundamental piece of the republic. "You can do as you wish, believe what you want, worship as you will, and if you can bring up a wagon of shelled corn, we will buy it." God bless America.
                                        OK. I'm waxing stupid.'
                                        Ken
                                      • keeno2@aol.com
                                        Mr. Dorr. Respect, sir. Kentucky seems to have figured out that it wasn t going to get federal recognition and simply set out on its own to preserve the sites.
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Nov 2, 2006
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                                          Mr. Dorr. Respect, sir. Kentucky seems to have figured out that it wasn't going to get federal recognition and simply set out on its own to preserve the sites. So it may have been with a left-eye toward tourist revenue, its lean toward CW sites deserves kudos. They've done a fantastic job on sites ignored by the NPS. Bless Kentucky! Does "God Bless Kentucky" fit in the lyrics?
                                          Ken
                                        • gnrljejohnston
                                          ... location of this Shaker Village. Ken. Ken, Shaker Village is in Pleasant Hill which is close to Bardstown. Go to the URL for accurate info.
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Nov 3, 2006
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                                            --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > Excellent advice, honored lurker, but missing in your post is the
                                            location of this Shaker Village. Ken.

                                            Ken, Shaker Village is in Pleasant Hill which is close to Bardstown.

                                            Go to the URL for accurate info. www.shakervillageky.org/

                                            JEJ
                                            >
                                          • gnrljejohnston
                                            ... or in ... Shaker ... Ken, Shaker Village is in Pleasant Hill which is near Harrodsburg. Just a short drive from either Lexington, Richmond, or Perryville.
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Nov 3, 2006
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                                              --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
                                              >
                                              > Thank you evermuch General, but no one has yet given me the town near
                                              or in
                                              > which this village can be found. I'd very much like to stop at a real
                                              Shaker
                                              > community on the way to something more focal. > Ken

                                              Ken, Shaker Village is in Pleasant Hill which is near Harrodsburg.
                                              Just a short drive from either Lexington, Richmond, or Perryville.

                                              JEJ
                                              >
                                            • mobile_96
                                              ...
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Nov 3, 2006
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                                                --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@... wrote:
                                                < They've done a fantastic job on sites ignored by
                                                the NPS. Bless Kentucky! Does "God Bless Kentucky" fit in the lyrics?
                                                Ken.>
                                                And don't forget to visit Merchant's Row in Perryville.
                                                Last I heard they were still working on turning as much of it as
                                                possible into a Living History village. In '03 they were working on the
                                                Dr's Office and home. A short distance north of town is Bragg's HQ.When
                                                there last, the building had residents, but I understand they were in
                                                the process of getting them out, so they could get it restored and
                                                opened. You can also take the winding drive (off the main road just a
                                                bit south of the house) down behind the house, to the location of the
                                                only still operating spring in the area. The spring is not visited
                                                often, as I have to get out and move branches from the road before
                                                proceeding down.
                                                There are a few soldiers, from the battle, buried in the town cemetery.
                                                Even without the battle held nearby, the town has a interesting early
                                                history.
                                                Chuck
                                              • gnrljejohnston
                                                ... lyrics? ... the ... HQ.When ... in ... a ... the ... cemetery. ... early ... Also, you can take the road West out of Perryville, go to the end and turn
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Nov 3, 2006
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                                                  --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "mobile_96" <mobile_96@...>
                                                  wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, keeno2@ wrote:
                                                  > < They've done a fantastic job on sites ignored by
                                                  > the NPS. Bless Kentucky! Does "God Bless Kentucky" fit in the
                                                  lyrics?
                                                  > Ken.>
                                                  > And don't forget to visit Merchant's Row in Perryville.
                                                  > Last I heard they were still working on turning as much of it as
                                                  > possible into a Living History village. In '03 they were working on
                                                  the
                                                  > Dr's Office and home. A short distance north of town is Bragg's
                                                  HQ.When
                                                  > there last, the building had residents, but I understand they were
                                                  in
                                                  > the process of getting them out, so they could get it restored and
                                                  > opened. You can also take the winding drive (off the main road just
                                                  a
                                                  > bit south of the house) down behind the house, to the location of
                                                  the
                                                  > only still operating spring in the area. The spring is not visited
                                                  > often, as I have to get out and move branches from the road before
                                                  > proceeding down.
                                                  > There are a few soldiers, from the battle, buried in the town
                                                  cemetery.
                                                  > Even without the battle held nearby, the town has a interesting
                                                  early
                                                  > history.
                                                  > Chuck

                                                  Also, you can take the road West out of Perryville, go to the end and
                                                  turn right and it will loop back to the road you were on out of
                                                  Perryville, but heading East. This little loop is quite interesting
                                                  for there are several markers there, including where the first
                                                  encounter of Confederate troops with Sheridan's troops, thus
                                                  beginning the battle of Perryville. I believe I posted pix of this
                                                  area on the website.

                                                  JEJ
                                                  >
                                                • pete@blueone.net
                                                  Shakertown is on Hwy 68 southwest of Lexington and northeast of Harrodsburg. From Lexington, look for Hwy 68 (Harrodsburg Road) on the southwest side of the
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Nov 4, 2006
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                                                    Shakertown is on Hwy 68 southwest of Lexington and northeast of Harrodsburg. From Lexington, look
                                                    for Hwy 68 (Harrodsburg Road) on the southwest side of the city.
                                                    If in Frankfort, take 127 south to Danville and then go northeast to Shakertown.
                                                    Signs to Perryville in Danville and Harrodsburg abound--you'll have no problem getting to P'ville
                                                    form either location.



                                                    ------- Original Message -------
                                                    From : keeno2@...[mailto:keeno2@...]
                                                    Sent : 11/2/2006 11:06:55 PM
                                                    To : civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com
                                                    Cc :
                                                    Subject : RE: Re: [civilwarwest] Re: Chickamauga by Turchin

                                                    In a message dated 11/2/2006 9:35:24 PM Central Standard Time,
                                                    pete@... writes:
                                                    If a lurker can throw in a comment, Shaker Village is very worthwhile. If
                                                    you have time, eat a meal there and you'll enjoy food as never
                                                    before--everything grown or raised on the site or a nearby farm. But to eat genly requires a
                                                    reservation a few days in advance. Pete Cohron
                                                    Excellent advice, honored lurker, but missing in your post is the location of
                                                    this Shaker Village. Up this way we have the Amish. And if you want meat and
                                                    pototoes to die for, slide over to one of their communities. I'm guessing the
                                                    Amish and the Shakers have absolutely nothing in common except for a
                                                    bottom-line appreciation for good food and plenty of it. We're certainly not going to
                                                    find a dish of tossed greens lightly sprinkled with balsamic vinegar and olive
                                                    oil with a scattering of garlic-touched croutons.

                                                    Will note your response and mark my calendar with indelible ink. Thanks in
                                                    advance,
                                                    Ken.
                                                  • nickrelee@aol.com
                                                    As posted earlier I may have found a copy of Chickamauga by Turchin that was owned by Rosecrans. I looked thru the entire book and found only 4 pages where
                                                    Message 25 of 27 , Nov 7, 2006
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                                                      As posted earlier I may have found a copy of Chickamauga by Turchin that was owned by Rosecrans.  I looked thru the entire book and found only 4 pages where notes were made.  I just posted these scans onto the photo page on the group's homepage.  Its in a folder called "Pages from Chickamauga by Turchin"
                                                       
                                                      The notes are pretty limited.  I didn't find anything that really confirmed that it was Rosy's book.  Online I found a place selling a letter of his which you can view at:
                                                      It appears to me that the handwriting is similar, but the two samples are small so a professional handwriting analyst probably couldn't say anything for sure.  But go ahead and look at the two samples and see what you think.  At first glance I'd say that the known letter doesn't destroy the possibility that the book was Rosy's. 
                                                      --Nick
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