Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[civilwarwest] Re: Chickamauga

Expand Messages
  • Laurence D. Schiller
    Hi Bill - please call me Laurie - no need for titles, please. Wilder very often, in the Atlanta campaign, cooperated with cavalry, but they were mounted
    Message 1 of 109 , Sep 27, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      [civilwarwest] Re: Chickamauga
      Hi Bill - please call me Laurie - no need for titles, please. Wilder very often, in the Atlanta campaign, cooperated with cavalry, but they were mounted infantry because when they fought, they fought only on the ground. Cavalry in the ACW, usually were dragoons - i.e. they fought both mounted with sabres or pistols, and on the ground with carbines (or, for the south, whatever long arm they could get). I find Wilder's unit endless fascinating.

      Best,

      Laurie Schiller


      Dr. Schiller, I can agree with you if you would call
      Wilder's brigade cavalry. Wilder's men may disagree,if the
      seemingly apochryphal story of their removing the yellow stripes
      from their trousers is indeed true. Minty put up a stout defense of
      the Reed's Bridge crossing (with the help of Wilder) while Wilder
      stopped Walker's small corps cold at Alexander's.

      Wheeler was resting and refitting to the South while the Union
      cavalry on that wing was watching him do so. Forest while due some
      criticism was by far the most active cavalry force on the field,
      fighting infantry all the way.

      I am inclined to believe that perhaps the most strategic move of the
      battle was Thomas' night march to the north which shifted the
      Union's left far beyond Bragg's imagination. Before this, Bragg's
      great strtegic plan (which IMO was a pretty good one) was to turn
      the Union left and herd them Southward to Maclemores Cove thus
      interposing himself between the Union Army and Chattanooga.

      But, with the shift to the North of of the Union's left and the
      inabllty of of the Conf. to make the flanking movement on the second
      day and coupled with the brekthrough to the South , all of a sudden
      the cats were being herded in the wrong direction, Ie toward their
      sanctuary in Chattanooga.

      Bragg was unable to mount a credible pursuit and had to settle for a
      hav azz siege which was soon broken.

      Just to reiterrate, my thought, (for the moment at least), is that
      Thomas' forced night march to the North is probably the most
      significant event of the battle.

      Bill Bruner

      --- In civilwarwest@yahoogroups.com, "Laurence D. Schiller"
      <LDS307@...> wrote:
      >
      > Greetings Nick - actually the Federal Cavalry performed quite well
      > (and Wilder's mounted infantry). Minty at Reeds Bridge and Wilder
      at
      > Alexanders (and then Long and Wilder later) did excellent work in
      > holding up the right wing of Braggs attempt to flank Rosencrans on
      > the 19th.
      >
      > Best,
      >
      > Laurie Schiller
      >
      >
      > >How well is the Union cav performing during the campaign? I
      don't
      > >ever really hear much about them. I would think that since Bragg
      > >nearly sprung a trap at McLemore's Cove they weren't doing a top
      > >notch job but its something I've never gone into much.
      > >--Nick
      > >
      > >In a message dated 9/22/2006 5:46:37 AM Mountain Daylight Time,
      > >LWhite64@... writes:
      > >
      > >I would say the top three moments would be, in the campaign as
      > >whole, the failure of the CS Cavalry to be Bragg's eyes and ears,
      > >The unfortunate circumstances on the Federal right about 11 on
      Sept
      > >20, note that it wasnt just Wood making a gap that was a problem,
      > >the entire right wing is in motion. Then the Hollywood moment of
      > >the arrival of Gordon Granger.
      > >
      > >Lee
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > --
      > Dr. Laurence D. Schiller
      >


      -- 
      
      Dr. Laurence D. Schiller
    • Laurence D. Schiller
      Hello Hank - as far as I know, they were not drilled as cavalry - they did not practice the evolutions of cavalry and I have not seen anywhere where they used
      Message 109 of 109 , Oct 5, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Hank - as far as I know, they were not drilled as cavalry -
        they did not practice the evolutions of cavalry and I have not seen
        anywhere where they used their horses as anything but transport.
        Dismounted cavalry and infantry skirmish lines are pretty much the
        same, so Wilder's men fought in that fashion, although they had
        originally been drilled as regular infantry.

        Best,

        Laurie Schiller


        >Any idea how similar, or not, Wilder's brigade drills were to
        >infantry and cavalry units?
        >
        >Did they learn the evolutions of the mounted arm, merely how to ride
        >or something in between?
        >
        >HankC
        >

        --
        Dr. Laurence D. Schiller
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.